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students with disabilities

Other Student Life

How Online Learning Increases Approachability for Disabled Students

May 28, 2021

There are eight sections in which impaired students are categorized according to their conditions – medical disorder, mental disorder, cognitive impairment, hearing problems, language disability, visual deficiency, acquired brain impairment, and intellectual disability.

Because certain people are physically and emotionally deficient, this does not rule out their ability to succeed in school or the workplace. Education is no longer an arduous task for disabled students, thanks to the introduction of eLearning. Technology which plays a vital role in delivering ideal learning solutions for disabled students.

Disabled students who study online find it more rewarding and less challenging to get knowledge. Disabled students may find it challenging to access a traditional education school, but this is not the situation when they use online learning platforms.

Remote working is getting a lot of spark in recent days. It’s convenient to work from home without having the hassle of moving around and dealing with the morning commute. Working from home also allows disabled people the convenience of operating from home with their ease. They can apply for the desired job from home and can get free resume reviews from online platforms.

Many universities and colleges have begun to provide online learning tools. The idea of virtual campuses is increasingly expanding these days, and thus more disabled students are enrolling. Technology also plays an integral part in delivering ideal learning solutions for disabled students. Students nowadays have the option of choosing their locations for coursework and research.

Furthermore, disabled students choose to learn online because it allows them to have more time to finish homework and allows them to sit, relax, or exercise anytime they need to. For disabled people, there are several advantages to eLearning that they can take advantage of without difficulty. We will mention below that how online studying increases convenience for these students.

Learning at your own pace and location

As a critical forum for online learning, the Internet provides disabled students with the ease of getting educated. Students who are mentally or physically impaired no longer have to drive long distances and struggle with the issues that come with it, such as being pressured for time and continually coping with pressures, thanks to computer-based learning. According to studies, 90 percent of disabled students don’t attend schools. Many individuals, rather than disabled students, do not have the ability or resources to drive long distances.

One of the critical reasons attending college or university is daunting for disabled students is the inconvenient commute. Every day tasks become quite hectic and special students need assistance from others. Simple activities like using the toilet may be a mild hassle for college-bound students who live with their disability. Imagine them commuting long distances to and from school every day! With physical disabilities, going to university for many years to get a degree seems like a lot of effort.

Benefits of online learning for disabled students

When physical disabilities prohibit you from doing what everyone else: like gaining a degree, it’s possible to get frustrated. This mindset is flipped via online learning, promoting the mentality of “I can do it!”

There are many ways in which students with disability who are studying online does not feel discouraged or do not mind any inferiority complex. Online studies remove any kind of discouragement and complexity from the disabled student’s minds.

  • Since online learning is more convenient, students feel freer to engage more than if they were in a loud or distracting environment. Fear of loss or judgment is also reduced because there is no peer pressure or rivalry. Online students now have quick access to the services they need, which impacts their overall results. It’s also worth mentioning that online educators are actively knocking down walls to promote online student engagement.
  • The ability to “study within their own tempo” is a crucial factor in disabled graduate’s progress. The ability to plan their own timetable relieves the undue burden that most students in traditional universities experience. Disabled and regular students can take breaks whenever they want or prepare for as long as they wish in certain college classes. They follow the correct principles to prevent mental or emotional exhaustion.
  • Disabled students who study online have more time and space to work. They will check the content and watch lectures however many times as they like with eLearning. Students with visual processing disorder or dyslexia can modify digital text using IT programs and software by changing the font type or scale, which helps them interpret information more efficiently.
  • Students with hearing loss may benefit from technological advancements. They can watch lectures with subtitles, something they cannot do in the classroom. Since the text is the primary means of contact for teachers and other pupils, it can be a more convenient way to communicate through platforms and emails.
  • Students with psychiatric disabilities can practice and learn in their settings. Since it is challenging for them to deal with the circumstance and distress, their familiar environment would aid them in learning by eLearning.
  • At any step, two key factors are helpful to disabled students: persuasion and versatility. Distance learners will benefit from online learning because it is more versatile than conventional schooling approaches.

BIO: Grace Griffin is a member of the writer’s team on Research Prospect. She has Bachelor’s in Law, Masters in Literature, and a PhD in Economics. Grace is a technical writer and loves reading articles, blogs, magazines, newspapers and books.

Student Life

Thriving With a Disability in College

January 18, 2021

The National Center for Education Statistics reports approximately 11% of college undergraduates have a disability. Federal statistics show less than half of these students graduate from two-year courses within eight years, and only one-third of disabled students complete four-year courses. There are various reasons for this educational gap, including the fact that the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which ensure disabled students are accommodated as required, only apply to colleges receiving federal aid. This, coupled with having to suddenly adapt to independent life without your usual support basis, can add challenges to the college experience.

If you’re about to embark on your first year of study, here’s how you can ensure you have an optimal learning experience.

Battling Stereotypes

A study by Alison May and colleagues, published in the Journal of Learning Disabilities, found that it is generally accepted that “people with disabilities constitute a stigmatized group and that disability stigma has a negative impact on students with disabilities in higher education settings.” There are various categories of stereotypes about people with learning disabilities. These include believing that students have a low level of intelligence. Added to this issue are social challenges, since students with disabilities often have to spend longer on academic tasks, leaving less time for socializing. Students with disabilities can also fear being criticized by teaching staff and peers. 

Choosing The Right College

Selecting a college with a wide array of services can make a big difference when it comes to the quality of one’s learning life. Students with cerebral palsy, for instance, may have complex needs, owing to a possible combination of visual, hearing and speech impediments. When cerebral palsy is first diagnosed in a baby or small child, doctors are often unable to predict the challenges they may face as they grow older. Adults, for instance, can develop walking and other disorders that require them to use a wheelchair. In these cases, ramps, elevators, and other equipment are key for attending class and making your way to different areas of campus. 

Top Colleges For Students With Disabilities To Consider

Just a few colleges with a stellar reputation for accommodating this and other needs of disabled students include Landmark College, The University of Arizona, Beacon College, the University of Connecticut, and the University of Iowa. Some colleges also have prestigious programs for students with disabilities – including the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of California, Berkeley, and Wayne State University. The latter, for instance, is fully wheelchair accessible, and has a program called Handicapper Educational Services – which provides financial aid, personal assistance, and other types of help for students with disabilities.

Applying For Grants And Scholarships

It is important to be an active member of a network centered around your disability so as to be aware of any new grants and scholarships you may be entitled to. The National Federation for the Blind, for instance, sponsors 30 grants and scholarships every year. You can also safeguard your finances by taking out insurance catered to students, including renters and tuition insurance.

While a fraction of undergraduate students have disabilities, an even smaller percentage complete courses necessary for a degree. In order to maximize your chances of thriving in college with a disability, selecting the best college is important. Be sure to look for one that offers educational support as well as other services for students with disabilities.