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student success

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5 Ways for Students to Help the Environment

April 10, 2021

Environmental justice is a topic that’s on the mind of a lot of students these days. It can feel discouraging to hear about a problem that is so big and out of control like climate change. But there are some simple ways to make a difference!

Here are few things you can do to reduce your carbon footprint.

Calculate your impact

It’s helpful to be more aware of the impact of your lifestyle. Check out Conservation International’s Carbon Footprint ​Calculator​! Start thinking about how you can drive less, carpool more, and opt for greener alternatives when possible.

Recycle

Recycling is a great way to be more aware of your consumption. It’s important to be aware of ​proper recycling etiquette​ to ensure you are recycling what you are supposed to. For most cities, contaminated recyclables often end up costing a lot more money to dispose of versus if they were clean. So make sure you rinse that pizza box out before throwing it in the blue bin, and tossing out your bottled drinks without the liquid!

Eat more plant-based

One of the biggest differences you can make for the environment is ​consuming fewer animal products​. You don’t have to go completely vegan to have a positive impact! Try Meatless Mondays or experiment with veganizing one of your favorite meals. Plus, many fast food joints offer Impossible burger options these days to make it easy to eat plant-based on the go.

Thrift

Thrifting is a fun way to limit your consumption and contribution to fast fashion. Check out our ​College Student’s Guide to Thrift Shopping​ for some tips on how to start shopping second-hand. You can also thrift furniture!

Reuse

Try to limit your use of single-use plastics. Invest in quality reusable items such as water bottles and shopping bags. If you do end up with plastic bags from the store, repurpose them as trash bags or for pet waste cleanup.

These are just a few ideas to help you be more environmentally friendly. Take some time to educate yourself on how you can be a more ethical consumer and continue to make lifestyle changes that contribute to a more sustainable future!

Student Life

Selecting Your Perfect College Major

April 8, 2021

Being a student can often feel like a whirlwind. Between taking a full load of courses and working in order to pay for the massive tuition fees, you also need to develop an overarching plan for your educational experience. Selecting a major, for example, can be one of the biggest challenges facing you. In order to make a decision that feels right for you, take a moment to review these points and learn more about narrowing down your choices. 

Think About Your Passions

Perhaps the easiest way to start is by thinking over what you are passionate about. What motivates you? More importantly, what are you curious about? When you start to scratch at the intellectual itch that comes from college campuses, you’ll start to uncover a wealth of information that inspires you in ways you never imagined. While you might not find your major right away, you will begin to take classes centering on topics that capture your interests. Over time, this will start to lead you toward a sensible major.

Look at the Staff

Another way that people tend to find their majors is by looking at the staff. Poking around in the directory of your college will start to show you the names of notable individuals in various departments. For example, students in science programs at UC Berkeley may find it helpful to know that a reputable expert like John Arnold teaches in the College of Chemistry. Give yourself time to root around in your directory and read various papers published by staff at your college to start finding people who inspire you.

Work With a Mentor

There are all kinds of useful services available to students at colleges and universities. For example, academic counseling services are usually provided to students as a way of offering needed guidance. When you’re not sure what classes to take or if you are in the right major for your interests, you can turn to these professionals to give you a push. In some cases, you may need to meet with several different counselors to find a good fit. Just as with any professional relationship, being able to communicate with each other helps you get the most from the connection.

Ponder Career Choices

Another way you can narrow down your selection and find a major is by thinking ahead at possible career options you will have. While people might advise you against a particular field because it doesn’t offer too many job opportunities, you can always find work if you know where to look. Sometimes, this means working in your field in a different capacity than you had initially envisioned. Look at where graduates in various programs wind up working and this might help you see which industry is the best fit for your goals.

Picking a college major can often feel like a huge decision. While it is true that you want to put thought behind your choice, you should not let it weigh you down for too long. You can always change your major if you find the path you have selected is not playing out as you had hoped. 

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Adulting Career Student Life

3 Ways to Balance Work and Study

April 6, 2021

You’ve probably always had a certain subject that fascinated you. In your free time, you may find yourself reading about new innovations and insights in the field. You constantly have ideas on the topic that start with, “It would be so cool if they…” 

Sound familiar?

The only downside is that your field of interest has zero to do with your current job. 

It may be a great time to take the leap, study your chosen subject, and get a degree or certification that would allow you to channel that passion into a career that inspires you every day.

Studying and working simultaneously can be a daunting endeavor. But it can be done! Some sacrifices and strict budgeting will be required, but only for a finite period of time. 

Here are three tips for how to make the most of your schedule when balancing work and study:

Maximize your available “ear time.”

There are more times during the day than you realize when your hands may be busy doing something, but your ears are available to study. This is why it’s a great idea to get assigned reading in an audio version if available. 

Record all of your lectures and corresponding notes that you take yourself. You can even create “audio flashcards.” Record a question or definition and leave a few beats of silence for you to drill your responses as you listen.These recordings can be used when you’re driving, working out, cleaning, cooking, getting ready, waiting in line, etc. 

Also, be sure to take advantage of the time immediately before bed. Our brains retain information that we consume right before bed the most clearly into the next day. Wake up and refresh the information as you get ready, and you will have successfully “locked it in.” 

Another great idea is to use repetition immediately after hearing a lecture. Take several minutes to go over the notes you just took and “teach” them to yourself out loud as if you were the professor. This will solidify connections between ideas and make them far easier to remember in the long run. 

All of this will help the information you’re learning to become information that you know. Which means you won’t have to desperately cram before a test. Instead, you’ll be refreshing thought connections that have already been solidified with personalized associations.

Break apart your workload into bite-sized pieces.

A great method for managing your study load is to chop up your reading and studying into smaller goals for each study session available over a given period of time.

For example, you’ve been given a 50-page reading assignment due in five days. First, determine the available time you have outside of work and family obligations. If you have four hours over the course of five days, you can estimate your target per-hour page rate. For that particular week, it is 12 and a half pages an hour. And, depending on how long your time blocks are, you will divide your page goal accordingly. So if you have 15 minutes while you’re waiting for something to cook, try to read about three pages.

Breaking up your reading and studying into smaller, more manageable chunks will help you avoid the stress of trying to find huge blocks of time to complete larger assignments. And preplanning the proportions helps alleviate the constant, “I have so much to do!” feeling. You can relax a little, knowing that as long as you successfully accomplish each predetermined portion in the schedule you created with your free time, you will reach your target goal for the overall assignment. 

Take advantage of vacation days.

This tip is likely not a crowd favorite. When taking on the added workload of balancing a job and study, sacrifice will be needed on some level. The things you should not sacrifice entirely are as follows: sleep, exercise, meals, hygiene, your job, and at least some quality time with family and friends. 

But the things that you will need to be willing to sacrifice are watching TV, viewing social media, partying, and sadly, vacations. You will still be utilizing your vacation days but as brief rest days and pre-test or presentation prep days. 

When you get your syllabus, mark out when events like this are happening and put in your request to use a vacation day for the day before well in advance. This will allow you a dedicated chuck of time to refresh everything you’ve learned and finalize any preparations you may need.

A major benefit to this: it will decrease your anxiety leading into a test or presentation day. Increased anxiety will only undermine your performance, so take that vacation day to prep and gather focus.

Throughout your time as a working student, have your “why” handy. Write a mission statement for yourself beforehand and read it whenever you feel a bit like tearing your hair out. Writing down your “why” will also help you understand where this motivation to study and shift gears is emanating. If at first, your “why” is only “to make more money,” you may want to do more research into careers that can make you more money but also genuinely interest you. 

When you read your “why,” you want it to touch something deeply motivating and energizing within you. Once you have that, it can act as a pair of jumper cables when you feel depleted and fuel you as you master the balance between work and study.

BIO: Kristie Santana is a life coach based in New York City. She is the founder of the National Coach Academy and co-founder of Life Coach Path. Her mission is to help prepare aspiring coaches for a thriving career doing the work they love.

Career Transition

3 Ways to Gain Experience That Will Land You a Job After College Graduation

April 1, 2021

If you head to college right after high school graduation, your focus for the next 4+ years probably isn’t going to be climbing the corporate ladder. Granted, you’ll work toward a major and learn how to do a specific job.

But, that doesn’t mean a career will be available to you immediately after graduation. College can offer a degree, but you’ll enter the working world with “entry-level” experience, which many employers don’t want.

So, what can you do to gain experience while you’re in school so you can kick off your career right away?

Immerse Yourself in the Collegiate Experience

One of the best ways to gain experience and get advice is to take advantage of all the services your college has to offer. Develop a close relationship with student services. It’s their job to not only get you through your collegiate career but help you prepare for the “real world.” They can assist you when it comes to things like resume writing so your job applications will pass things like automated applicant tracking systems.

Student services can also help with:

  • Campus life and extra activities
  • Mental and physical wellness
  • Diversity on campus
  • Alumni relations

Those functions can all help you gain more experience for a future job. Getting involved with activities and clubs on campus can help you gain experience in teamwork or leadership without having to work in an actual “job.” Plus, those who work in student services might be able to connect you with alumni in the industry you’re interested in.

Whether you’re getting your degree online or in-person, reach out to student services in an email or give them a call. Student services should be available to the entire student body.

Take a Part-Time Job

Many college students end up working part-time jobs to help pay for tuition, food, or off-campus housing. But, the right part-time job can actually be a great way to network. Having an internship in college is helpful, especially if it’s in the industry you’re interested in. But, internships don’t usually pay, and you may not get the hands-on experience you need if you’re just getting people coffee.

So, while there’s nothing wrong with waiting tables or working retail, try looking for a part-time job that will allow you to hone in on the skills you’ll need for a long-term career. That could include working in an office, or even starting your own freelancing business on the side for writing, graphic design, or any other useful skill you want to grow. You could even start your own online business as a side hustle. 

Even if you haven’t decided on your major, holding down any part-time job will let future employers know that you’re responsible and able to stick to a schedule, so it looks good on a resume.

Get Involved Locally

If you don’t want to work in college, consider volunteering either on campus or in the local community. While it won’t show up as work experience on a resume, sometimes life experience is more appealing to employers. Getting involved with an organization that matters to you will give you hands-on experience.

You’ll grow skills like:

  • Leadership
  • Teamwork
  • Organization
  • Patience

Adding these skills and your volunteer experience to your resume could be extremely beneficial, so don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty.

Landing a job after graduation isn’t just about having experience in a particular industry. It’s about having well-rounded skills and knowing how to market them. Keep these tips in mind to get the job you want after graduation, rather than sending out dozens of applications with nothing in return.

BIO: Sam Bowman has a passion for learning. As a seasoned professional writer, he specializes in topics about people, education, tech and how they merge. In his spare time he likes running, reading, and combining the two in a run to his local bookstore.

Adulting Student Life Transition

6 Common Money Mistakes New College Grads Make

March 25, 2021

College graduation is a time of celebration for students and a jumping-off point for the next chapter of life. It’s a time to make important decisions, whether you’re continuing your education with a higher degree, starting your career, or taking a moment to regroup.

But it’s not the time for making poor financial choices. Here are a few common money mistakes recent grads make and how to avoid them.

1. Thinking retirement is too far off to start saving

Retirement may be years away, but it’s better to start saving for retirement as early as possible. The earlier you start saving, the more time your investments have to grow. As you add money to your retirement fund, interest also starts to accrue. Over time, you start earning interest on the interest you’ve earned. This is called compound interest, and it’s a powerful savings tool. The earlier you start saving and earning compound interest, the better.

2. Missing student loan payments

Right after graduation is the time to focus on your financial future, which includes keeping up with student loan payments. This will help ensure you continue to build a positive credit history and possibly improve your credit score. A positive payment history and healthy credit score could open up more money-saving financial opportunities down the road, such as lower interest rates on an auto or home loan.

3. Overspending that new paycheck

If you have a new job in your chosen career field, you could be making more money than ever. But before you go spending your paycheck on the luxury items you’ve always wanted, consider the impact these purchases will have on your budget.

Necessary expenses — like rent, utilities, and groceries — should come first. Less obvious but important expenses like building an emergency fund or having enough for auto insurance coverage should also be considered before splurging on “wants” versus “needs.”

4. Banking where your parents do

The bank your parents use (and now you probably use) is likely a suitable location for storing money in FDIC-insured accounts. It’s not a bad thing to have access to brick-and-mortar locations, but most traditional bank accounts can’t compete with the benefits of online banking.

Making the switch to an online bank could help you earn more interest, avoid unnecessary fees, and still have FDIC insurance. In addition, your current bank might not offer other perks that come with the best checking accounts, like getting your paycheck early or having easy access to your money through a mobile app.

5. Misusing credit cards

Credit cards can be a helpful tool for building credit and having cash flow when you need it, but using them irresponsibly can offset their benefits.

Keep in mind that building your credit history and improving your credit score means following some accepted best practices. This typically includes making your payments on time, using less than 30% of your available credit line, keeping your oldest credit accounts open, having different types of credit accounts (for example a credit card and an auto loan), and not opening too many credit cards too quickly in a row.

6. Skipping renters insurance

Whether you’re back studying on campus or off to live on your own, renters insurance can offer you essential financial protection. This type of insurance can include coverage for clothing, laptops, bicycles, and other belongings in case of unexpected events like vandalism, theft, or fire.

If you keep these six tips in mind, you could avoid some of the common money mistakes that recent college grads make. This will help you take proactive steps to secure your financial future.

BIO: FinanceBuzz’sVP of Content, Tracy Odell, also held the same position at Student Loan Hero and has expertise in this subject, as well as all things related to college finances.

Adulting Student Life

Learning to Drive in College

March 10, 2021

There is really isn’t a perfect time to learn how to drive. While it may be common for people to get their driver’s license in high school, for some, it may not be the right moment. Furthermore, accessibility plays a major role in learning how to drive at a young age. Not having a car or lack of affordable lessons can be just a few reasons why someone might not learn to drive before heading off to college.

With that being said, there are a number of benefits to learning how to drive — especially for the average busy college student. It can provide a greater sense of independence and open the door to new adventures, as just a few examples. It can also make commuting between classes, internships, and extra-curriculum activities a bit easier, especially if your current city or school campus lack public transportation services.

Whether you’re about to graduate or just starting your freshman year, learning to drive in college doesn’t have to be intimidating or daunting.

Let’s Be Crystal Clear

There’s a lot to look forward to once you learn how to drive, but before that happens it’s important to do a bit of housekeeping first. Ahead of setting up driving classes or arranging a testing appointment, it’s worth getting your eyes checked.

Your vision needs to meet a certain standard before you’re allowed to hit the roads. Of course, finding a convenient eye doctor while in college isn’t always the easiest or most affordable. Luckily, there are eyewear services that allow you to try certain eye prescriptions and accessories at home. Having slightly blurry vision might not be a huge problem while in class or walking around, but it’s extremely dangerous as a driver. Make sure your vision is crystal clear before getting behind the wheel, even if that means investing in a new pair of glasses.

Get Ahead of Traffic

There are a number of surprises and challenges drivers can encounter on any given day. However, one thing that is not at all surprising to the average seasoned driver is traffic. Depending on the city where you attend school, traffic congestion could be a major factor you need to keep in mind while driving. Researching things like your college town’s local traffic patterns can help you learn more about what roads are best to avoid at what times. It’s also essential to study high-traffic rules and other safe driving practices to ensure the safety of yourself and other drivers. It’s a lot easier to manage things like sudden speed reductions, lane merging, and aggressive rush-hour drivers if you know what to expect beforehand. 

Start With Familiar Places

Like with most things in life, practice can help improve your confidence, but particularly as a new driver. Considering that driving is often much more than pressing your foot on the accelerator, a great way to build up your driving skills is with short and familiar routes. Whether that’s to a nearby park or to the bodega down the road, you can build up your driving skills, improve your reflexes, and work on your weakness without the pressure of navigating a new area.

Even though we’ve agreed there’s no right or wrong time to learn how to drive, there can still be some anxieties surrounding learning to drive at an older age. You can feel judged or embarrassed about not having a driver’s license yet, but don’t let those feelings stand in the way of your goals. Good luck!

BIO: Sam Bowman has a passion for learning. As a seasoned professional writer, he specializes in topics about people, education, tech and how they merge. In his spare time he likes running, reading, and combining the two in a run to his local bookstore.

Other

The Most Influential Professors in Recent History

March 8, 2021

Professors influence the world around them in several different ways. They instruct and guide students through classroom lectures and career advice. They also advance general knowledge of how the world, the universe, and human societies work through their research. Often, they influence others in both ways at the same time, although either research or instruction typically occupies a majority of a professor’s time. Professors of the past have been responsible for breakthroughs that irrevocably changed the way that people live, and today’s professors are constantly seeking new innovations and discoveries. The following are important professors in all different fields who deserve respect and appreciation for their important work and the benefits it offers.

Marie Curie

Marie Curie helped set the stage for future scientific professors, such as Berkeley chemistry professor John Arnold. While many professors today specialize in only one field, Marie Curie studied both chemistry and physics. Through her research on radioactivity, she discovered two elements, radium and polonium.

Despite operating in what was considered at the time to be a man’s field, she broke new ground as the first woman awarded a Nobel Prize. She is still the only woman to receive two Nobel Prizes and the first person of any gender so honored. Not only did she help advance scientific understanding but she also helped promote equal opportunities for women through her work. However, her accomplishments came at a price, and she died in 1934 of a sickness believed to be related to radiation exposure.

Noam Chomsky

Noam Chomsky is considered the founder of modern linguistics, which is the study of language development and acquisition. Today, he is better known to many for his political activities, but he revolutionized linguistics with an influential theory that the human brain is hard-wired from birth to learn to speak and write. According to the theory, the brains of young children are more receptive to language acquisition, and as they get older, this receptiveness goes away and learning language becomes more difficult.

Barack Obama

Many people may not be aware that Barack Obama was a college professor prior to his landmark presidency. Obama attended Harvard Law School where he broke barriers as the president of the Harvard Law Review. Following graduation, he went on to teach at the University of Chicago Law School where he taught constitutional law.

Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking was a theoretical physicist who overcame a nearly lifelong struggle with ALS, a neurodegenerative disease, to become a renowned professor of mathematics. He was also respected in popular culture, in part because of an appearance on the science fiction series “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” On a tour of the set, Hawking looked at the warp core, which gives the fictitious Starship Enterprise the power of faster-than-light travel, and remarked that he was working on making it a reality.

Judith Butler

Butler teaches in the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley but has been influential in a wide range of fields beyond literary theory. Her work has been applied to queer activism, ethics, and political philosophy, to name a few.

Albert Einstein

Einstein is not only one of the most influential professors of all time but also one of the most iconic, instantly recognizable even to people who have only the barest understanding of his theories. Einstein was something of a Renaissance man who explored different philosophies and had a deep love for music. Raised in the Jewish faith, Einstein emigrated to the United States in 1933 to flee Nazi persecution. He was a complicated individual who described himself as a pacifist, yet also lent his considerable talents to the Manhattan Project, the purpose of which was the development of nuclear weapons, out of concern that the Nazis might develop it first. His involvement in nuclear weapons development would be a source of inner conflict for him for the rest of his life.

Of course, there have been many influential professors going back through history, such as Sir Isaac Newton and Galileo. Even Socrates could be considered a professor, though the term wasn’t in use during his time. Professors of the past and present continue to inspire the thinkers of the future.

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Student Life

The Best Options After Your High School Graduation

February 26, 2021

If you are graduating high school, you might feel as though you are finally an adult, and you can take charge of your life and make the best choices for what you want to do. But perhaps you feel uncertain about what you can do after high school, or what the best path is to take. Take a look at some of these common choices young people make when they are at a crossroads in life, and see which one feels right for you and your goals.

Working To Save Up

If you don’t know what you want to pursue in college or you have other goals you are trying to meet, it’s not uncommon to choose to work full-time rather than go to school. Maybe you want to save for school so you aren’t paying out of pocket with a bunch of loans, or maybe you are trying to get an apartment, a car, or something else that would enable you to live easily as a young adult on your own. Some individuals try out different career paths during this time while others volunteer or earn certifications that can help them work in an industry they are interested in. Whatever the case may be, working to save money is a common choice during this time of transition.

Traveling To See The World

Traveling to see the world can have so many different meanings, depending on what your goals are. Maybe you’d like to visit the country your family originally came from, or perhaps you simply want to venture out and see more of the United States. If you’ve been asking yourself the question “why take a gap year?” there’s no better reason than to travel and see more of the world around you before deciding to take root somewhere.

Trying Out Community College

Going to community college is an option if you want to get started taking general college courses but still aren’t sure what you’d like to do in the long-term. This allows you to focus on core subjects that you would be familiar with from high school, while everything is still fresh in your head. Then, depending on what you’d like to focus on, you can narrow down your studies later on. You can choose to earn an associate degree or simply focus on subjects you know will transfer over no matter where you want to attend.

While graduating high school can be an exciting time, there are different paths you can take if you’re not sure what is best for you. Working to save up money is common among many young adults, while some opt to travel and see the world. This could be within your own country or far away depending on finances and a desire to travel. Finally, going to community college can be a useful way of earning credits and taking necessary classes while you decide on what you would like to major in eventually. Just remember, there is no right or wrong path, just what is best for you.

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Student Life

Essential Items to Take to College

February 22, 2021

Heading off to college is an exciting time. There are plenty of articles and advice columns listing everything you need to transition successfully. Most students, though, end up with too much stuff. It may be fun to decorate your dorm in September, but you’ll be wishing you had spent your money on different things when you’re trying to pack it all up in May.

Food

Even if you’re on a meal plan, it’s best to bring food with you to college. There are various reasons why. The first is that you are bound to miss open hours of the cafeteria at some point because you took a nap, stayed out too late or were studying too hard to take a break. Most cafeterias keep shorter hours on the weekend. If you haven’t settled into a friend group yet and don’t have a car, you may find yourself at loose ends on a Sunday night. Sure, you can walk a few blocks to a fast-food restaurant, but what if it’s raining? It’s just smart to have some ramen, peanut butter crackers or Power Life to add to a smoothie. There will be times you will get hungry when everything is closed, so be prepared.

First Aid Kit

Speaking of being prepared, be sure to bring a first aid kit with you when you go to college. Your mom won’t be around to bring you ibuprofen and water when you have a headache. Nor will she be there to put her hand on your forehead to check your temperature. You will have to do these things yourself. If you think there is a possibility that you might overindulge one weekend, keep antacid handy. A box of bandages is a great purchase too because you will probably be doing more walking than you have ever done in your life.

Water

Disposable plastic water bottles are frowned upon on college campuses. Water stations to fill up your own reusable water bottles are the norm. Plus, you’ll save money in the long run. Water bottles are also easy to lose, so bring a couple just in case you set yours down somewhere and forget it. Staying hydrated is extremely important. Keep a couple chilled in your dorm fridge so you always have a cold one handy.

Laptop

If you made it through high school on a shared family computer, now is the time to purchase a really nice laptop with your college graduation money. Many universities offer deals to college students if you buy the computer through them. Figure out a way to get the most powerful computer you can afford. You will be expected to complete almost all work electronically, and you will need a computer that doesn’t crash.

Backpack

Besides your computer, your backpack will get the most use while you’re in college. Choose a sturdy one with extra padding. Attach a luggage tag to the outside and the inside. Backpacks are THE fashion accessory for college students, but they are also a necessity.

Instead of focusing all your attention on color coordinating your throw pillows and hanging beading around your bed, skip the extra decoration in favor of spending money on what you’ll really need. Hang a single flag over your bed for a simple decoration and put your money towards more important purchases.

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Career Student Life

7 Online Business Ideas for College Students

February 18, 2021

As a college student, schoolwork can be frustrating. It is not just because college life can be challenging, but also due to the lack of financial independence.

Luckily, college students these days can earn money from the comforts of their home. That is, if you know time management skills and how to meet your deadlines.

If this is something you can handle, here are seven online business ideas that you can start today.

Online Tutoring

If you know that you excel at a particular subject, consider getting into online tutoring. You don’t even need to go to your students’ house to teach them because you can do it through a video call.

When you tutor a student face-to-face, you can charge higher for it, but if you can’t do it face-to-face, especially nowadays, you can do online tutoring.

What’s great about that is that you can teach anyone from anywhere. You also have the advantage of offering cheaper rates because you don’t have to be face-to-face to teach your students.

Freelance Writing

Freelance writing is such an approachable way to make money online, even as a college student. It’s another gig that you can do no matter where you are, even when you’re in your college dorm. Since you probably have to write papers as a college student anyway, freelance writing is just like that, but you get money from it.

Ecommerce Store

If you have a hobby where you make things from scratch, you might want to sell them online by starting an ecommerce store.

Anybody can do it, and you can sell almost anything online. If you make stickers, knit, or even create digital products, you can start an ecommerce store.

The options are endless, but your biggest struggle might be your ability to stand out. Think about what makes your brand or product unique and how to best get the word out about it!

Website Development

If you have programming or web development experience, consider working as a freelance web developer. There are plenty of small or even large companies who want someone to make websites for them. Your expertise will surely come in handy, especially in this digital age.

Virtual Assistant

Running a business is a tough job that requires you to juggle a lot of tasks and roles. That’s why many entrepreneurs hire assistants nowadays to help them manage their workload.

In this modern world, we now have something called a virtual assistant. A virtual assistant is like an executive assistant, although you do things online.

This allows you to work with someone from another country. And your tasks can include organizing your boss’ schedule, scheduling and confirming meetings, and more.

This can be an excellent way for college students to earn some money, and gain some experience you can put on your resume. And you might even learn a thing or two about running a business from your employer.

Dropshipping Business

These days, there is a growing number of people who buy their daily needs online. Whether it’s for groceries, clothes, or anything under the sun, there’s an online shop there for you.

However, inventory management can be overwhelming, especially if you are staying in a dorm. This is where dropshipping could come in handy.

That’s because it allows you to run an online store without having to worry about where to store your products. That’s because your manufacturer and supplier can handle it for you. This also includes packing and shipping products, as well as handling returns.

Luckily, there are a plethora of dropshipping guides online. Hence, you’ll never run out of ideas on how you can maximize your dropshipping business.

Blogging and Vlogging

Social media has allowed people from all walks of life to become celebrities of their own.

If you’ve always been interested in being known for your character, you might want to start blogging or vlogging your daily life. It’s like having a passion project that can make you money, but it can take a while before you start seeing money rolling in through ads or merchandise. Think of a niche and see how far it takes you!

The online business ideas listed above can help college students to earn money while pursuing their degree. The best part is that you not only make money, you are also setting up your career path.