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student success

Adulting

7 Time Management Tips for Working Students

October 11, 2021

Studying for a major exam or writing a paper is time-consuming, but it’s even more challenging when you’re dealing with a job at the same time. Effective time management can often be the difference between passing your classes and struggling, but how do you manage your time while you’re working? With the right plan in place, you can enjoy a successful academic year, all while keeping your job.

Read on for a list of 7 time-management tips for working students that will help to ensure success in school and your career.

Make a Schedule

Every successful venture starts with a good schedule in place. Whether daily, weekly, or monthly, the first step to effective time management is creating a schedule that works for you, then stick to it. If you need to, design a schedule that allows you to work in 30-minute increments. For example, jot down your work hours, then break up your non-working hours in smaller bites, noting which classes will need the most attention first and when.

Don’t Procrastinate

It can be easy to put off things you don’t want to do, but procrastinating will always result in you feeling stressed out later. Avoid putting off something you can do right now whenever possible. The sooner you accomplish tasks, the more free time you’ll have to enjoy things later on.

Prioritize

Set your priorities in order of importance and try to “knock out” the most essential items first. Even if you have to start small, doing things right away will make meeting deadlines and writing papers easier when the time comes. Not only will prioritizing tasks make it easier to get them done on time, but it will also ease your stress levels.

Plan Ahead

Create a daily or weekly to-do list so it’s easier to plan the things you need to get done in advance. Keep track of important dates and deadlines, and ensure that you’ll have plenty of time available to complete them in advance. Not only does planning ahead make it easy to accomplish tasks, but you’ll remember which things need to complete and when.

Avoid Multitasking

Many people think that multitasking is the best way to get things done, but it can actually backfire. When you multitask, you’re not dedicating all of your brainpower to one task. Avoid the temptation of multitasking and instead, try to put all of your attention on each item individually to stay focused.

Stay Healthy

Getting proper exercise and eating a healthy diet will help you feel better physically and mentally. Don’t forget to make sure that you’re getting plenty of sleep every night, too. When your body is healthy, your mind will be much more agile and able to retain important information.

Create a Routine

Creating a regular routine is vital to any successful lifestyle. Do your best to go to bed and get up at the same time every night and make studying a part of your daily life. Once you have a set routine, it will be much easier to stick to the daily things you need to do.Keep these seven tips in mind if you’re a working student to help you manage your time as effectively as possible. With these simple tasks, you can begin to make each one of them a daily habit that will set you up for success. Remember to devise a schedule and prioritize the most important things you need to do to work best for you and your lifestyle for a successful working life and academic career.

Adulting Student Life

Essential Apps for College Student Survival

October 7, 2021

If you’re a student who’s constantly multitasking, college can seem like a difficult endeavor. It’s especially true if you rely on a part-time job to make ends meet. But at the same time, you’re always trying to balance out other activities and engagements, such as meeting friends, gaming, and relaxing. Managing social and academic life, in this regard, requires that you’re fast and super productive.  

As the education sector integrates more and more technology, students can find new innovative ways to balance their academics and social life. So whether you’re a college freshman or in your senior year, you’re probably looking for apps that can make it easier to survive college. 

Here is a list of some essential apps you can use to manage time and improve your productivity. 

Evernote

A big part of college life entails “note-taking.” How about having an app that allows you to take notes by entering text and ideas?

Evernote can do just that. This amazing app is a “must-have” for every student. From note-taking, organizing them to managing tasks, everything becomes a piece of cake with Evernote. It allows you to take comprehensive notes by adding images, audio, PDFs, text, and documents. 

Even better, the app includes a wide variety of tools that enable students to recall learned material saved as personalized notes. 

Plus, Evernote has an effectively integrated search engine to help you trace phrases within your notes, providing faster notes retrieval. It not only hastens your revision sessions but also allows you to incorporate material relevant to your concepts.

Grammarly

It’s not uncommon for students to turn in fantastic assignments, only to lose marks because of poor grammar or lackluster vocabulary. Sure, it seems unfair, but you can’t deny the importance of good grammar when it comes to writing quality assignments. In this case, apps like Grammarly can be a huge help. This app can significantly improve sentence structure and boost your work’s readability and clarity.  

In addition to this, Grammarly offers numerous suggestions for different errors to help you understand your grammatical weaknesses. The app is compatible with many other applications to enrich your communication.

Turnitin

Turnitin, like the former, is an important service for writing quality papers. The app catches plagiarism in the work and allows you to correct all the plagiarized parts of your essays.

Prezi

College presentations are challenging and can be time-consuming. Use Prezi to add a wow factor to your text while reducing the effort and time spent making a presentation. With Prezi, you can keep your focus on research and deliver a comprehensive and appealing research presentation. 

Another thing that makes Prezi even better is its easy-to-use feature. You don’t need to have video editing expertise or graphics to use Prezi.

Microsoft Office Lens

Microsoft Office Lens is an excellent app that has revolutionized note-taking. It provides students an easy way to scan material for conversion to Word, PDF, PowerPoint, and save to the cloud or local device. It helps students to concentrate on their revision instead of spending time taking notes.  

Dropbox

Dropbox is a popular app that ranks high as a cloud storage solution. The app allows students to access all documents easily. With Dropbox, students can seamlessly access documents and files across numerous devices. 

Mint

Finances are some of the tricky elements in the life of a student. Mint is a smart app that helps students keep track of their expenses, thus enabling them to develop healthy spending habits. Besides this, Mint offers suggestions to create financial goals to help college students balance their accounts.

In a nutshell, campus life is hard. But for all your student-life challenges, there is a comprehensive app to reduce the burden. The given apps are the top picks to help you make stellar essays, manage time, and boost productivity.

BIO: Lyle Solomon has considerable litigation experience as well as substantial hands-on knowledge and expertise in legal analysis and writing. Since 2003, he has been a member of the State Bar of California. In 1998, he graduated from the University of the Pacific’s McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento, California, and now serves as a principal attorney for the Oak View Law Group in Rocklin, California.

Student Life

7 Habits That Ruin Your Productivity

October 4, 2021

Being productive is something we all want, and often struggle to achieve. Successfully navigating college involves a high level of productivity, but getting sidetracked is a common problem that many students face.

Little habits that creep in can soon become entrenched, sapping concentration and motivation. Becoming aware of these is a good first step in dealing with college life—and enjoying it.

There are seven common habits that get in the way of being productive.

1. Trying to multitask

Our brains are not built to manage more than one task at a time. A study on the subject revealed that only 2.5% of research participants could multitask successfully. Stick to one task at a time, finish it, and then move on.

Keeping on top of assignments and tests isn’t easy. Many students find themselves stretched across a number of activities at anyone time. Trying to multitask, however, often results in taking longer to complete things.

2. Constantly checking email and social media

It should come as no surprise that interrupting your work regularly with distractions lowers productivity. The habit of checking social media constantly disrupts your focus and ends up eating away even more time as you try to settle back down to work.

A few tips to help curb this habit include:

–    Use tracking apps to monitor how long you spend online

–    Use apps to block access to certain websites

–    Go back to the basics: switch your phone or other devices off while you complete a task

3. Being too hard on yourself

Some people believe that being ultra-harsh on themselves is good for self-discipline and personal growth. But beating yourself up when things don’t go right can actually make you even less productive than usual. The mental energy it takes to scold yourself saps your concentration, and with it, your ability to work and study.

4. Not taking breaks

It might seem like plowing through tasks without a break is the best way of getting things done efficiently. But not taking breaks can have a negative impact on your productivity.

Getting adequate rest, taking some time out to play games, or do anything else you enjoy increases your overall productivity and reduces your chance of burning out.

5. Waiting for the perfect moment

A common form of procrastination is waiting until you feel “ready” before beginning your work. No matter how tempting this might be, it’s probably one of the worst ways to approach your studies. Before long, this habit can become a full-blown mental block.

6. Leaving difficult tasks until last

This also relates to procrastination and perfectionism. It can be easy to push your more difficult tasks to the back of your mind. However, putting them off can prove disastrous in the long run. By the time you get around to doing whatever needs to be done, it’s likely that you’re tired and unmotivated.

7. Saying yes to everything

Completing assignments, studying for tests and taking part in student activities are all important parts of college life. Despite this, trying to do absolutely everything can get in the way of enjoying your time as a student—as well as destroying productivity.

To produce good work and engage with your studies, you need to set boundaries around how you’re going to spend your time. Learning how to balance life and work is a great skill for everyone to master.

Nobody is productive 100% of the time. Set realistic expectations and manage your time well and you’ll make maintaining a high level of productivity a good habit.

Adulting

Adulting 101: 15 Tips Everyone Should Know About

October 1, 2021

Let’s face it: Adulting is hard! How can you make your life smooth-sailing when transitioning from being parent-dependent to living your life on your own terms?

When you were younger, you probably felt excited about the independence that comes with adulthood. But as you entered this stage, and went off to college, you probably realized you have to include home and health responsibilities, finance management, and some organization into the equation. 

It can seem overwhelming at first. Here are some tips to make your adjusting easier as you handle your grown-up responsibilities.

Home

Tip 1: Clean Your Home Regularly

By regularly, I mean at least once a week. During your adulting years you’ll experience more stress. Putting off cleaning your home will just make it worse. 

Cleaning your house regularly doesn’t just make the place tidy and organized, but it also clears your mind from too many worries. Vacuuming and mopping can be even more of a hassle if you put it off for a few weeks, so make it a habit to knock it out when you clean the bathrooms, counters, and other parts of your home.

As you declutter your house, you declutter your mind as well. 

Tip 2: Learn To Do Minor Home Repairs

You don’t have to be like The Fixer from Youtube. You just have to learn the very basics so you can fix small damages quickly. 

You’ll also get to save some money which you’d otherwise need to spend on experts for doing tasks you’ll later realize are so simple to do if you just did a little bit of digging on how to do it. 

Some of the things you can learn to do online are:

  • Clearing gutters
  • Patching small holes
  • Clearing gutters
  • Replacing light bulbs and light fixtures
  • Replacing a blown fuse
  • Turning off the main power supply if you’ll be out for a few days
  • Unclogging a drain
  • Plunging a toilet
  • Turning off the water supply
  • Replacing air filters

Tip 3: Learn Laundry and Mending Skills

Did you ever have a white shirt that turned pink after laundry? That doesn’t only happen in movies, it happens when you mix colored shirts and white ones in one wash. 

Or have you tried wearing a shirt that used to fit right only to feel extra tight after it went through the dryer? It happens.

To avoid those things from happening, here are some laundry skills you need to keep in mind:

  • Separate delicates, whites, and darks when washing
  • Do small loads at low heat when drying clothes to avoid shrinking
  • Use warm water or cool setting to prevent color bleeds
  • Hang delicates when drying to keep the cloth quality intact

Moreover, you’re bound to get ripped shirts, popped buttons or broken zippers one day. Learn to do basic sewing, button, and zipper change. There are plenty of tutorials and how-to articles out there!

Health And Wellness

Tip 4: Learn To Cook

Relying on fast food, takeouts, and deliveries isn’t just unhealthy, it bores a big whole in your pocket. I’m not saying you have to avoid those altogether, you just have to minimize depending on them by learning to cook

You can either take a cooking class, ask your mom to teach you, download meal apps, or watch Youtube videos on meals you’d like to eat. 

Tip 5: Set At Least 30 Minutes Daily For Exercise

You don’t have to get a gym membership. A short walk, 15 minutes of light stretching, or a video-guided exercise on Youtube will suffice. 

As you grow older, you’ll start to feel aches here and there. Setting a few minutes of exercise a day keeps you physically agile and prevents sores you’d likely get from sitting all day. 

Tip 6: Schedule Annual Doctors Appointments

Taking care of your body now will save you from serious health complications down the line.

Scheduling appointments for yearly physicals, regular teeth cleaning, and eye check ups will help you catch anything early and get it treated before it gets worse.

Finances

Tip 7: Create A Budget

Unless you have an unlimited inflow of cash, you’ll need to create a budget. It’ll help you prioritize spending on the essentials and put spending on wants in place. 

Spending like a king on the day you receive your pay or allowance will get you hanging by a thread weeks before the next allowance or pay arrives. 

Creating a budget also allows you to allot some cash for savings so you’ll have something handy for the rainy days. 

Tip 8: Save For At Least 3-6 Months Of Your Monthly Expenses

You don’t know when times will get hard. If you find yourself unexpectedly unemployed, an emergency savings fund will save you stress and potentially getting yourself in debt.

Tip 9: Consider a Secondary Source Of Income

If your time allows for it, find another source of income. It’ll help you save bigger amounts, pay off debts faster, or give yourself a break on a nice vacation.

Flipping burgers isn’t your only choice. If you have a creative eye you can design comic books, magazines, or booklets then get it printed to be sold or as a portfolio to get clients. You can also do digital illustrations if you have the knack for it. Side hustles are everywhere if you look hard enough.

Tip 10: Learn A New Skill

Find a skill you’d like to develop and think of ways you can make money from it. 

The digital world offers a lot of potential and it continues to grow since the demand for it in virtually all industries increases. 

Interested in photography? Learn it and create a website for it.

Always on social media? Learn social media marketing. 

Want to master writing? Learn copywriting or content writing SEO for eCommerce

If you can’t find a physical job right after graduating or if you want to quit your stressful 9-5 job, having an extra skill will ensure you’ll have other ways to fend for yourself. 

Tip 11: Get Insurance

There are tons of types of insurance, but for adulting, the best ones to get are life insurance, medical insurance, and auto insurance. Don’t forget tuition insurance if you’re still in college, and renters insurance whether you’re living on or off campus!

Getting insurance will ensure injuries or accidental damage are covered and you won’t be shelling out a ton of money out of pocket.

Others

Tip 12: Plan Out Every Day And Stick To It

Wait. Before you say planning and organizing is not your cup of tea, hear me out first. 

You don’t have to be extra detailed about your daily, weekly, or monthly activities. That’s too overwhelming. 

Just jot down the most important things you need to get done on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. 

You can take note of:

  • Homework
  • Meetings
  • Regular chores
  • Bills payment dues
  • And important events

This way you won’t condemn yourself for missing events, forgetting to have some broken appliance checked, or being late and unprofessional in meetings. 

Creating a simple organizer or journal says a lot of your work ethics. When adulting, you always want to leave a good impression.

Tip 13: Acknowledge Your Limits

You are no superhero. Don’t spread yourself too thin by committing to too many meetups, work, and other activities. 

Thinking you can do everything will only lead to burnout. When you’re adulting, the world isn’t too forgiving when you break down from exhaustion so make sure you get enough rest by acknowledging you can only do so much. 

Also, learn to say no. It’ll save you a lot of trouble in the long run.

Tip 14: Take A Break

When everything is closing down on you, take a breather. It could be a weekend drive, a few days of vacation on a beach, a visit home, or a day of hiking near nature. 

Pulling a bit away from your usual routine will help you think clearly of why you’re doing what you’re doing and get you re-energized to start your routine again. 

Tip 15: Keep A Routine Maintenance Of Your Car

Your car breaking down in the middle of nowhere or the middle of a busy street will take your stress to a whole new level. Towing and repairs can be costly too. 

To keep preventable breakdowns from happening always do:

  • Regular oil change
  • Tire rotation/alignment
  • Filter change

Just like learning minor repairs in a house, you should also learn to change a flat tire. It’ll save you time waiting for somebody else to do it for you and save you money for calling on a tire expert to do this simple task. 

Don’t forget about registration renewals too. The last thing you want is paying for a ticket!

Conclusion

Adulting doesn’t have to be back-breaking ( figuratively and literally). Keeping these 15 adulting tips on your home, health and wellness, finances, and other areas will make your grown-up responsibilities worth-taking, less stressful, and best of all, enjoyable. 

Other Student Life

6 Tips to Launch an E-commerce Business While in College

September 27, 2021

Starting a business while you are still in college can help you earn money even before you graduate. This can help you be a self-supporting student or pay your student loan afterward.

If you are wondering what kind of business you can start while still in college, we suggest that you dive into e-commerce. Here’s why:

  1. It gives you the potential to earn while you sleep.
  2. It does not cost much to create your own e-commerce site.
  3. It has the potential to grow exponentially.

If you are interested in opening your online store, here are six tips you should keep in mind:

Define Your Market

The key to having a successful business is to ensure that people will be willing to buy your products. As such, you must define who your target market is.

Luckily, your college can be an excellent starting point. Observe the trends in your school or figure out their common dilemma. From there, you can niche down.

For instance, you notice that your schoolmates rely too much on processed food. What could be the reason behind it? And how do you intend to respond to it?

Find a Product to Sell

Once you have determined your target market, what you need to do next is to figure out what you can sell to them.

Using our previous example, there are two ways you can cater to the student’s need for a nutritious meal:

  1. You can sell homemade nutrition bars. It is cost-effective and easy to do on your part, while it gives your schoolmates an option for a healthy snack.
  2. You can dropship healthy, ready-to-cook meals. It eliminates your need to produce the product and manage your inventory. Plus, you can have a high profit margin.

These are just two examples of an online business model. You can come up with your own, depending on the resources that you have.

Name Your Online Store

After determining your target market, the product you will sell, and how you will sell it, the next step is to turn your business idea into reality. You start by naming your online store.

Here are some quick tips you can keep in mind:

●  Make it short and simple so that people can easily remember it.

●  Consider incorporating your target keyword (more on that later).

Set Up Your E-commerce Website

Here’s why you need a short and simple name for your e-commerce business: It’s because it will also serve as the domain name of your website.

To set up your online store, you will need a domain name and an e-commerce website builder like Shopify or WooCommerce. From there, you can choose a web design theme that you can tweak a bit before you begin.

Your website does not have to be perfect. But it should be functional.

And while this is the part where you will need to spend some money, setting up your e-commerce website should not cost much.

Understand SEO

Search Engine Optimization is ensuring that your e-commerce website will appear on search engines.

So, if you are selling nutrition bars online and one of your schoolmates typed in “affordable nutrition bar” on Google, your online store should be one of the search results.

Although you need to consider various factors in ranking a website for a specific keyword, we suggest learning SEO basics first. That way, you would know the fundamentals you need to apply on your e-commerce site for launch with a bang.

Leverage Social Media

Social media is an excellent way to market your business. More so, if your school has various Facebook Groups where you can join and sell your products.

You can also make a dedicated page for your online business to expand your market reach. What’s important is that you follow each platform’s guidelines.

It may sound like a lot of work, but starting an e-commerce business while still in college can benefit you. And when you follow the tips listed above, you can launch and grow your online store without hassle.

Student Life

7 Student Saving Tips on Electronics & Back-to-Campus Items

August 17, 2021

Shopping for back-to-school supplies can be an expensive exercise, but there are many ways to make savings by utilizing a few tips and tricks.

Here are 7 simple money-saving tips to keep your back-to-campus shopping to a minimum.

1. Don’t double up on what you already have

Unless this is the first year that you have ever bought supplies for school, chances are that you have a surprising amount of stuff left over that is still perfectly usable.

This might sound obvious, but all-too-many people get stuck thinking that they need to buy everything brand new for a new year, yet they are surrounded by many items with plenty of life left in them. So, do a full inventory of what you already have before finalizing a list of what you actually need to buy.

2. Plan and budget

Once you have a firm list of all the essentials that must be bought, work out a budget and break it down into realistic categories, such as clothing, supplies, electronics etc. Having a budget to follow and track can help you to avoid overspending.

3. Buy in bulk when it makes sense to

Any items that you will repeatedly need throughout the year can be saved upon if you buy them in bulk at a discounted price. So, any time you find a great deal on any replaceable items, such as stationary for example, buy up for the year – you’ll make a saving overall as well as relieve yourself of having to reshop every time you run low on a particular supply.

4. Delay less-urgent purchases to spread the expense

There may be some items that you simply won’t actually need at the start of the year, some perhaps not even for the first semester.

So, for example, if there is an expensive textbook for a subject that you won’t be starting until later in the term or year, leave purchasing it until nearer the time to spread the costs instead of having to find it all upfront.

This goes for seasonal clothing, too, and anything else that isn’t an urgent purchase.

5. Search for student discounts

There are a wide variety of discounts available for college students on many different purchases, including technology, clothing, travel, streaming media and more.

For example, Amazon Prime offers students half price membership, Grubhub gives student members free delivery on orders over $12, Spotify offers significantly reduced student subscriptions, and you can get 10% – 15% off of student travel through Amtrak and Greyhound.

For these and more student savings, take a look at bankrate.com’s list of 2021 offers. These savings may not always seem like a lot, but there are so many student offers to utilize across a variety of daily expenses, that the savings can really stack up over a year.

6. Don’t pay full price on tech items

Electronic devices and technologies can represent the greatest expense when it comes to preparing for life as a student on campus, but it needn’t be quite as costly as you think.

For starters, refurbished electronics are often in ‘like-new’ condition and sold for a fraction of the cost of a new one off the shelf. This goes for laptops, desktops, monitors, tablets, televisions and audio equipment. The important thing is to ensure that the item has been genuinely refurbished and not only cleaned up and repackaged. 

To be sure, you can stick to buying refurbished products from the original manufacturers, for example:

  • Samsung-certified refurbished phones carry a one-year warranty
  • Apple also offers a one-year warranty on its pre-owned phones
  • When you buy a refurbished item from Dell, you receive a 100-day (limited) warranty, as well as  a 30-day money-back guarantee

Also, take the time to shop around for discounts and promotions, as well as coupons – especially online coupons for computers and other big ticket electronics. 

In fact, it’s worth noting here that online couponing is big business in today’s ecommerce world, and you can usually find a discount coupon code for most online purchases, so it’s worth taking the extra couple of minutes to find a saving on whatever you are shopping for.

7. Save on textbooks

According to the College Board, it is estimated that a student studying at college for four years can expect to pay around $1,240 per year on books and other supplies.

Marketplace, Craigslist, and other online second-hand platforms can be a great place to start when it comes to finding some bargains, but you can also save hundreds of dollars by renting your textbooks.

Textbook Rentals, Cheapest Textbooks, and Campus Books are just a few of the helpful sites that specialize in selling used textbooks and renting them out, too.

Final thoughts

There’s nothing wrong with wanting to feel extra prepared by splurging on supplies. But, by utilizing a few money saving tips and tricks, you can leave yourself a little more financial wiggle room for spending extra in other areas, including having fun!

Student Life

Helpful Tips to Succeed in College Math

August 13, 2021

Most students will take at least one mathematics class in college and it is not uncommon to take the same math course more than once to pass. Even if your major is in humanities and social science, most colleges will require all students to complete at least one math class. There is a reason why colleges do this as it’s important to always learn new things. Nonetheless, here are some handy tactics for you to succeed in college math classes.

Plan ahead

Students often don’t plan for the semester ahead and this is a big mistake. Plan your semester, mark down when homework is due and when you need to prepare for your exams. Professors will not coordinate with other classes to give you time to prepare for exams. In fact, sometimes exams can be all in one week so you are responsible for keeping track of where you should be.

Students should always read the materials before a class even if it is difficult to understand. Learning this way will give you the opportunity to think about the materials beforehand and be ready to ask about any confusing concepts in class.

You can even go further and plan who will be the professor teaching your classes. Some professors are better at teaching and some might provide assessment formats that you are better at. It is always wise to scope out professors for the reasons above to prepare yourself with the best chances of succeeding in your math exams.

Read the textbook before solving the problems

Lectures are limited by time and will not cover everything in the textbook, so always review the chapter before attempting any math problems. College level mathematics can be more abstract and complex compared to high school, where mindless computations could be enough for you to pass. Understanding the concept of math problems can make the problems more fascinating and easier to solve rather than jumping directly into problems.

Do the homework

Completing homework in mathematics is essential for the making of an academic superstar. Homework given in class will most likely be the types of questions that will be in the exam and completing them on time will make the next class a lot easier. Take the homework seriously, be sure to ask questions when you can’t solve a problem and don’t leave a problem unsolved.

Join a study group

Better to be together than alone. Study groups are the perfect sharing point with your peers where you can find more resources, get homework help and teach each other. For example, other students may have more past papers to practice on or tips for the exam from students who have completed this class before. Either way, you can assess yourself, if you can teach someone else math, then you have truly mastered the topic.

Some colleges provide students in undergraduate math classes with free access to course assistants. For example, Harvard provides this through a community called Math Question Center (MQC).
Learning to succeed in college takes a lot of hands-on hard work and engagement with your classes. On the other hand there are different undergraduate math classes where you may do better in some and worse in others. You may be asking yourself, is calculus hard at college? In the end, math is one of those many hurdles you will face in college and it is not impossible to succeed in it. In addition to these tips, here are skills every student needs to succeed in college.

Student Life

How to Fight College Student Burnout

July 29, 2021

Burnout in college as a student is a significant ordeal. And if you are a parent, mentor, or professor looking to find ways to help your students make the most of their college experiences without losing sight of what is most important, obtaining their degree, you have come to the right place. There are some great ideas below to help prevent student burnout.

Evaluate Course Load

One of the quickest ways to burn out in college, particularly as a new student, is to take too many courses at once. Perhaps it would be best to use this time to take a look at your student’s college courses and go over each and everyone together. Help your student determine which types of courses are needed to achieve their degree, and which are geared more towards their personal interests.

If you find that their major classes are the ones that are most challenging, it might help to limit those courses to no more than two or three per semester. You want to help them work towards getting their degree without having the experience become overwhelming.

On the other hand, if their personal interest courses require too much time, have them consider cutting back on those in the future and adding courses that will be less time-consuming. The ultimate goal is to balance courses each semester so that the student is academically challenged but also has enough free time to engage in other activities.

Ask for Help

If, after going through the course requirements, it becomes clear that the courses are needed, but they need help with the homework or concepts that are discussed in class, finding a tutor may be beneficial. Many colleges offer tutoring in a variety of subjects to help students become more comfortable with the subject matter. Making use of their available resources can make all the difference in alleviating burnout and getting good grades.

Another area perfect for getting additional academic support is for graduate school entrance exams. The most challenging tests tend to be for the sciences, medicine, and law. And while preparing for any test requires a certain level of dedication and commitment, MCAT tutoring, for example, can help provide the skills needed to get into the best medical schools.

Carve Out Self-Care Time

Another aspect of college life is that there are always so many activities to enjoy. From parties to conferences, and everything in between, having the ability to take part in so much often can seem like college students should stretch themselves to the limit to take advantage of the available opportunities.

However, learning to take care of themselves and their health is a major part of transitioning to being an adult. And one of the most vital aspects of this is figuring out which events and activities are most enjoyable versus those that provide mild entertainment.

Focus on helping them navigate this area by discussing which activities have provided them with the most information or closest friendships. Are there just one or two clubs that they tend to enjoy most? If so, perhaps they should focus their time on these events and meetings and only occasionally frequent others until they feel less burned out.

Get Into a Healthy Routine

Now that the core of college has been addressed, it is vital to take a look at the college student’s health. To prevent and recover from burnout, living a healthy lifestyle is a prerequisite.

Help them navigate better eating habits. And note, that does not mean all they can eat is a salad. However, having a few servings of vegetables and fruit instead of French fries can be a great start. Teach the importance of taking small healthy actions each day that can add up to a much healthier lifestyle overall.

And lastly, it is important to use exercise and movement to maintain health. There is no need to go to the gym every day. But trying to get in an extra ten minutes or so of walking a day can play a great role in helping them to feel better.

Working together with college students to find ways to prevent burnout can be key to helping them achieve success. Utilizing the above tips can provide a strong foundation for how to start to intervene if college life becomes too stressful.

Student Life Transition

High Paying Jobs for Students With Loans

July 24, 2021

College is expensive, and there is no way around that. So what we find ourselves doing is taking out more student loans and graduating with more and more student debts. And the worst part is that some loans can take decades to pay off, which puts certain aspects of our lives on hold. 

However, some students can get rid of their student loans quicker than others based on their career choices. This guide will show you the best jobs that can help you pay off your student loan debts faster. 

  1. Physician 

It’s great to complete both an undergraduate program and medical school. But, unfortunately, physicians, anesthesiologists, GPs, surgeons, and other medical professionals can be saddled with massive student debts. 

Fortunately, most graduates of any of these programs can get a first-year salary of about $210,000. That can help you make significant improvements with your student loan repayment. 

  1. Analytics Manager 

Are you data-minded? You can put your skills to use as an analytic manager. To pursue this career, you must acquire a bachelor’s degree in statistics, math, IT, or other related fields. Data analysts help organizations and companies to make high-quality informed decisions based on statistical analysis. You can get between $80,000 and $90,000 a year. 

  1. Software Architect 

Software developers or architects are the geniuses behind your favorite computer programs and apps. If you have a knack for this career, you should pursue a computer science degree and specialize in development. 

You’ll need many hands-on experiences to secure a position in this field. So it’s advisable to search for internship opportunities while still enrolled in school. That can shoot up your chances of securing a job position. 

That’s why the competition between developers can be fierce, and their salaries tend to start just below $100,000.

  1. Air Traffic Controller 

It’s not a simple task to maintain the traffic flow around airports and throughout the world. However, air traffic controllers are the most detailed-oriented problem solvers, and they have excellent organizational skills. 

If you want to pursue a job in this field, you need to complete a bachelor’s degree program, including courses at the Federal Aviation Administration. Don’t worry about the extra schooling, though, as you may get about $110,000 a year. 

  1. Financial Manager 

If you enjoy managing money and working with numbers, you should consider acquiring a degree in finance. As a financial manager, you can help organizations, companies, and various people keep their economic lives intact. 

Financial managers produce and analyze financial reports, direct investments and can make about $115,000 every year. 

  1. Pharmacist 

Pharmacists work alongside doctors and patients to make sure that prescription medications are used safely. When you complete four years of pharmacy school and pass two license exams, you get your Pharm.D. From there, you can work at pharmacies located in health facilities, grocery stores, and drug stores and earn around $120,000 a year. 

  1. IT Manager Or Computer Systems Manager 

Information Technology managers or Computer Systems Manager assist in coordinating and directing computer-related activities. For example, if an organization needs a new computer system, the IT manager would coordinate everything. 

With a bachelor’s degree and a bit of experience, you can make around $125,000 a year. However, you can get more experience by taking internships while you’re in school. 

  1. Lawyer 

You can consider law if you’re not interested in any of the careers mentioned. Lawyers work with clients in both civil and criminal lawsuits in many different areas of the law. Depending on the area of expertise you choose, you can get between $80,000 to $160,000. 

Final Thoughts 

Student loans can be a huge burden to carry, which can leave you frustrated at times. However, one of the best ways to pay off your debts, besides public service loan forgiveness programs, is to get a high-paying job. Use this guide as a step in the right direction. If you don’t know what to do, we recommend talking to an expert to help you. 

Student Life Transition

Should You Pursue a Postgraduate Degree?

July 20, 2021

After graduating, most students head into the workforce. However, some find themselves in a post-grad slump and rather than transition into the “real world”, they choose to study further. Education is never a bad thing, but there are times it may not be the right decision. If you’re thinking of pursuing a postgraduate degree, here’s what to consider.

5 Reasons Why a Postgrad Degree Makes Sense

If a postgraduate degree will support your career goals, pursuing it makes sense.

1.  It can give you an extra edge in the job market

When you first graduate, you’re competing against other graduates as well as more experienced players in your field. Completing a postgrad degree could give you a competitive advantage in the job market. 

2.  You want a higher salary

The average annual salary for someone with a bachelor’s degree is approximately $59,124 compared to $69,732 for someone with a master’s degree and $84,396 with a doctorate degree. 

3.  You want to specialise or improve your expertise 

An advanced degree is worthwhile if you want to improve your skills or specialize. Let’s say you did a general degree like business administration. Studying for a postgrad in finance or economics could sharpen your skills and boost your credibility.

4.  You aspire to a leadership position

An additional degree can improve your chances of moving up the ladder. Many C-suite executives have completed an MBA (Master’s of Business Administration). However, degrees in science and engineering are also popular among executives.

5.  Your profession values additional letters behind your title 

In certain professions such as the medical, academic, or science fields, a master’s, doctorate or PhD degree is highly valued. It may earn you more respect and make you more employable. In fact, the lack of an advanced degree could actually hold you back. 

4 Reasons you should not do a postgrad degree 

Furthering your studies is a huge investment of time and money. So, you need to be sure you’re doing it for the right reasons. Here are a few reasons not to do it. 

1.  You’re doing it for prestige

Be clear on why you want to further your studies. Is it to keep up with your peers or for prestige? If you see it as a status symbol, this is the wrong reason to pursue a postgrad degree. 

2.  You’re time poor

If you have found employment or started a family, you may not have time for studies. Attending classes, studying for exams, and researching and writing dissertations take a lot of time. Can you fit it all in? Rather than overstretch yourself, it may be best to postpone your studies until you have more free time.

3. You’re unsure of your career goals 

The average person changes careers 5-7 times in their lifetime. How confident are you that you’ll want to remain in your chosen field 10 years from now? If you’re unsure, it may be best to gain some work experience first and reevaluate your career path later on. Then you can select a course of study that better aligns with the new direction you want to take. 

4.  You can’t afford it 

If you relied on a loan for your bachelor’s degree, increasing your student debt to get a postgrad degree may not be wise. If you can’t afford it, don’t do it — at least not now. You can always pursue a postgrad degree later on when you are more financially secure.

Should you decide to embark on a postgraduate degree, GradGuard can help protect your tuition fees. Our tuition insurance will reimburse your college fees should you be unable to complete your studies due to a serious illness or accident. 

BIO: Deevra Norling is a freelance content writer. She’s covered topics such as entrepreneurship, small business, career, human resources, e-commerce, and finance. When not writing, she’s tossing balls on the beach with the four-legged fur babies she looks after as a professional pet sitter.