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student risk

Health

 Walking For Your Wellness: A Student’s Guide to Mindful Exercises

June 7, 2022

While college provides its fair share of challenges, there are many ways that you put your mind at ease and improve your focus and general mental health. In addition to speaking to a counselor or calling a loved one, you also improve your wellness by taking a walk.

It’s true. While regular exercise can help you maintain a healthy body and strong bones, mindful practices can also help you strengthen your mind and fight the stress that college life can bring. Let’s talk more about what you can add to your health regimen.

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Health Student Life

6 Ways to Take Care of Your Mental Health this Summer

May 30, 2022

As Mental Health Awareness Month is coming to a close, making sure our mental health is a priority should be the focus for the next few months. Over the past few years, I and many others on campus have found that, since the pandemic, student mental health has declined drastically. Even in myself, I discovered that it has become that much more critical for me to set aside time in my schedule to prioritize myself and my own well-being. With all the activities, time, and social interaction lost from the ceaseless pandemic, students’ mental health everywhere has been diminished.

As a college student myself, I have found that there were things I did that helped me maintain good mental health before I got to college last summer and the summer before.

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Adulting Student Life

Fact or Fiction: The Truth About College Student Insurance

May 4, 2022
Students working on laptops laughing

By now, most of us know what insurance is, although maybe not entirely sure how it works or what makes a good policy. When it comes to the necessity of insurance, there is often some debate on what is covered, what’s a reasonable price, and if it is really something that people should invest in. College is one of the most expensive and risky investments a family can make. Still, many people may feel like insurance is unnecessary or unaware of what is included in a student renters and tuition insurance plan.

We break down all the misconceptions and myths surrounding college student insurance.

Fact or Fiction – 8 Misconceptions About the Value of Insurance for College Students

1. College students can’t afford renters or tuition insurance.

Fiction: Renters and tuition insurance are pretty affordable. In fact, a monthly renters policy with GradGuard costs as little as a Chipotle burrito meal! Students can also get coverage for as little as 1-2% of their overall tuition expense for tuition insurance, including room and board and academic fees.

2. My landlord will likely not replace my things if they’re stolen or damaged.

Fact: Presumably, your landlord has insurance that covers the building, but not what’s inside. So, if your backpack is stolen or your laptop is destroyed, you will be the one to replace it. Having a renters policy is essential in giving you peace of mind that your things will be protected if something happens.

Let’s take it one step further: GradGuard’s Renters Insurance follows you wherever you go. If your bike is stolen while running an errand or if your suitcase is taken while studying abroad, your renters policy has you covered.

3. My school has a refund policy, so I don’t need to pay for tuition insurance if I have to withdraw.

Fiction: Yes, your college or university indeed has a refund policy that is often only good for the first few weeks of classes. Beyond that, nearly all institutions don’t provide refunds if you were to completely withdraw, even for a medical condition such as anxiety, depression, or Covid-19.  Tuition insurance can help protect you so you don’t need to rely on this if you need to withdraw for a medical emergency.

4. My stuff doesn’t cost that much.

Fiction: Find out just how much your stuff is worth — and how renters insurance can cover it all. When you sit down to think about all the things needed to attend college, it can add up – and fast! If the unexpected were to happen, do you have the budget to replace everything you own? Renters insurance can help you get your money back so you don’t have to stress about how you would replace a stolen or damaged laptop or bike.

5. Renters insurance covers more than just my personal belongings.

Fact: The fantastic thing about a renters policy is its wide range of coverage! Not only is your stuff covered in your residence, on campus, traveling to and from school, and studying abroad, GradGuard’s renters insurance includes liability coverage and loss of use protection.

Liability and medical coverage – If you unintentionally damage your place of residence, you may be held responsible for damage to your apartment building or injuries to guests. Liability coverage may help you pay for any medical fees, property damage, or court costs in this situation.

Loss of use protection – This is important to help cover the costs of food and hotel rooms if your home becomes uninhabitable due to a covered peril like a fire in your residence hall.

GradGuard’s Renters Insurance provides these exclusive student endorsements, including a low $100 deductible and no credit scoring.

6. I am young and healthy, so nothing will happen to me.

Fiction: There is a reason the unexpected is, well, unexpected – you can’t and won’t see it coming. Even though many college students are in good health, being in college doesn’t magically make you invincible. Addressing the fact you may need to withdraw from school for any unforeseen reason is uncomfortable, but you know what’s even more concerning? The idea of losing thousands of dollars.

No one wants to think about ever needing to file a claim with a tuition insurance plan, but it can reimburse the cost of a completely withdrawn term in the event of a covered illness or injury.

7. My roommate has renters insurance, so I’m already covered.

Fiction: While you and your roommate might share snacks and a Netflix account, their policy usually covers their things, not yours. Getting your own policy allows you to customize protection that’s perfect for what you need. And if your entire residence is unintentionally damaged, the reimbursement costs can climb quickly. Separate policies will ensure all of your belongings are covered.

8. Epidemics including Covid-19 are a covered reason with tuition insurance.

Fact: GradGuard tuition insurance plans purchased on or after February 18, 2022, include an epidemic coverage endorsement, which can provide protection when an insured student completely withdraws from school for the covered term due to becoming ill with any epidemic or pandemic disease, including COVID-19*.

With life comes a lot of responsibility. We are here to help guide and educate you on the risks of college life. Now you know the truth about college renters and tuition insurance!

Terms, conditions, and exclusions apply.

Student Life Transition

Finding the Good in New and Challenging Situations

April 26, 2022

We’ve all been told that life is a challenge. It can throw you curve balls that you would have never imagined possible, but somehow we all manage to pull through. Although, not always in one piece.

As you move from one phase of your life to the next, you may be experiencing a number of changes:

  • Moving cities or even states.
  • A new job (maybe even your first full-time gig).
  • A boatload of new responsibilities.
  • New friends (or loss of them).

Young adults are inevitably going to trip and fall… A LOT. It’s easy to get discouraged from what may feel like constant letdowns, but remember: It’s okay. Follow these steps for finding the silver lining even in the roughest situations.

When the Going Gets Tough, Be Positive

The energy you put out there is the energy you’ll get back. If you are consistently focusing on the negativity, it will always find you. There will always be something gloomy in life, work, and school, but it is vital to not dwell on those things for too long before trying to find the positive. If you didn’t get the result on a test, you thought you would look for the positive instead of sitting around and moping about it. If something can’t be made positive, try to neutralize it instead.

Failure Can be Good

Our lives are made up of a series of mistakes and the lessons we learn from them. We aren’t born knowing how to walk, talk, read or write. By trial and error, we develop these skills and eventually can’t remember a time we didn’t know how to do them. Unfortunately, the difficulties we face get harder and harder as we get older.

When we make a mistake, big or small, the easiest thing to do is to talk down to ourselves or dwell on all the little clues we missed leading up to this unfortunate event. But remind yourself that we are always learning and growing. Of course, we are going to make a mistake at some point in our lives or another! Whether it’s during the first week on the job, or the first time you have to manage your own finances, you will probably make a mistake. And maybe make many of them. We don’t walk into the world and suddenly have everything figured out. The most important part is learning from those mistakes and ensuring they don’t happen again.

Making an error and failing is an essential piece to mastery. Embrace it.

Be Kind to Yourself

When something negative affects us, it is crucial to accept ownership of what happened, but to also quickly move into a more optimistic headspace. At the same time, it can be comfortable to turn to self-doubt and blame when we do something wrong. We’re only human; we are bound to mess up, but the important thing to remember is that we are not an accumulation of our failures.

Research has shown that talking positively to ourselves, especially when we are at our lowest, is key to overcoming our fears and vital to our mental health.

Some benefits of positive self-talk are:

1. Reduced Stress

Individuals who think optimistically are also more prone to positive self-talk and use more dynamic coping methods when faced with stressful situations and challenges. Positive self-talk helps you challenge the way you look at stressful situations by helping you understand that you will meet them to the best of your ability and that no matter what happens – you did the best you could. Tackling these situations with an ‘I can do this‘ mindset rather than a negative ‘This is too hard‘ opens up new ways of thinking and problem-solving.

 2. Increased Confidence and Resilience

Most of us have experienced the little voice in the back of our heads telling us that we aren’t good enough, but tackling life with a positive self-talk policy can help to boost your self-confidence. Above anyone else, you should be your biggest fan! Frequent positive affirmations will help you feel more confident when facing your fears and achieving your dreams. You instill yourself with the belief that the things you want are achievable, and when situations do arise, you are prepared to handle them head-on. 

3. Stronger Relationships

We all know how it feels to be around someone so bright, full of confidence in themselves, and loves to spread genuine joy. They ooze enthusiasm that bleeds into everyone around them. Positive energy is contagious, so if you bring out the best in yourself, you will also bring out the best in others. 

With all of the challenges college students face, finishing college may not be on the top of the priority list. GradGuard is here to help you find some positivity in what may be some unfortunate circumstances. Insurance provides peace of mind before the unexpected happens, such as having to withdraw from school for a covered medical reason or discovering your laptop was stolen. Renters and tuition insurance plans allow students to get back up when life knocks them down.

Takeaways

You are your biggest champion. At the end of a hard day, week or month, we hope that you are able to find the good. Positivity is infectious, and know you can do anything you set your mind to, even the really hard stuff.

Adulting Student Life

A Student’s Guide to Insurance: Travel Edition

April 19, 2022

Being a student has its fair share of traveling. From breaks, vacations, traveling to and from campus, to even studying abroad. Whether you’re road-tripping to the west coast, studying abroad in Spain, or enjoying the beaches of Southeast Asia, knowing the ins and outs of student insurance can help make your trip a safe one!

There are a few different kinds of insurance you should consider when traveling during school, both in and out of the country: Auto, Health, Renters, and Travel.

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Other Student Life

Why College Students Need Renters Insurance

April 4, 2022

In back-to-school mode, you and your parents may be caught up in the whirlwind of college life you have found yourselves in. With so much new information and experiences happening all at once, you or your family members may not think about some things when you head off to college. One of the most important things to consider when settling into your new residence hall, apartment, or condo is renters insurance.

Why you may ask? As a student, you are potentially bringing thousands of dollars worth of possessions to school, from electronics to books to laptops and even furniture. If your laptop gets damaged or stolen, how would you replace it? What about your clothes if your dorm room floods? These items may not break the bank to replace individually, but the costs can definitely add up! Have you ever thought about what ALL of your stuff costs, together, all at once? It may surprise you! That is why it’s so important to take an inventory of what you bring with you to school. The data collected over the last few years estimates that the total estimated cost of living per year for students, including food, housing, clothing, phone plan, and other things, is around $14,435, with an additional $2,316 on personal items.

The Break Down

Before you head off to school, it isn’t out of the ordinary to purchase many new things to go into your dorm room or apartment.

These dorm room items can include:

  • Bedding: Sheets, Pillows, blankets, duvets
  • Bath Items: Towels, robe, caddy, shower shoes
  • Decorations and other personal Items
  • Appliances: Microwave, TV, mini-fridge
  • Study Supplies: Calendars, planners, desk accessories
  • Storage: Drawers, baskets, bins, containers
  • Electronics: Gaming devices, iPads, speakers, streaming devices, cameras, computers, hard drives, headphones

These are just a few examples of what you can bring to campus, and when all added up, it can cost thousands of dollars. This doesn’t include your personal items such as clothes, bags, shoes, and other things you have collected over the years that are important to you. With such a wide range of prices on these items, leaving them unprotected should something unexpected happen isn’t worth the risk.

GradGuard: The Smart Choice

Colleges, universities, and off-campus property management companies don’t replace stolen bicycles or backpacks, but GradGuard College Renters Insurance can. Our coverage provides unique student-focused coverage through an exclusive student endorsement. That means you’ll have access to features that you can’t find in a standard homeowners insurance policy or other companies.

Here are a few examples of GradGuard’s student-focused features:

  • Low Deductible – Our standard deductible offer is only $100 when you file a claim, no matter the item.
  • No Credit Scoring – We took into account that you may not have a great credit score or even one at all as a student. No matter your credit history, everyone on-campus receives the same price.
  • Worldwide Property Coverage – Your belongings, including rented property, can be protected from covered perils anywhere in the world! If you are traveling home from school or studying abroad, GradGuard has got you covered.
  • Personal Liability Coverage – If you are hurt or unintentionally damage your place of residence, we may be able to help.

GradGuard College Renters Insurance was made with students in mind, unlike other renters insurance providers. If you file a claim, your rates won’t go up, and there are no sneaky sub-limits on electronics coverage. Our coverage protects physical items you bring to college (up to the policy limits) from things like theft, fire, smoke, vandalism, wind, sprinkler system discharges, and more.

You can also view a sample policy to learn about some more of the specifics of our coverage.

Other Considerations

Homeowners Insurance

If you are not the first person in your family to head off to college, you and your parents may think that you have everything under control. Your parents’ first instinct may often be to look into their current homeowner’s insurance. This is important to look at, but the coverage it can offer you as a student away at school may not be enough. Most of the time, a homeowner’s insurance policy will only extend to cover some of your possessions and may have a really high deductible.

A big downside of using this coverage is that making a claim on the homeowner’s policy may raise premiums. Homeowners’ policies often have limits, exclusions, and certain conditions that you can’t rely on to automatically cover you and your belongings while you’re at school. You may be better off just replacing that couple thousand dollar laptop out of pocket. Or even better, opting for GradGuard!

Landlord Protection

Many parents believe the landlord will cover damages when it comes to liability. More often than not, a landlord’s insurance only applies to the building itself, not the resident’s possessions within. Double-check with the landlord and ask what their insurance policy would cover should a theft or other disasters occur. Having your own insurance policy is a great way to ensure that the things you bring along with you to school are protected.

Another common myth is that renters insurance is too expensive and unnecessary. Even though it is an added expense, the benefits outweigh the costs should any disaster occur and your belongings suffer damages that could put you out thousands of dollars to replace on your own. Renters insurance is a great way to prevent significant financial loss and encourage students to start thinking responsibly about their belonging and move towards adulthood.

Student Life

Starting College on the Right Foot

February 23, 2022

College is a whole different ball game than high school, and contrary to popular belief, it has nothing to do with the classes or work you’ll be doing. For many students, college is the first time you will be responsible for yourself in more ways than one. One of the most significant differences is being in complete control of your education. You get to decide what you would like to study and what classes you get to take. You have the power to determine your academic future!

For many students, this can be overwhelming with so much new incoming information. We are here to help give a few pointers to ensure that you don’t overlook important details, whether it is your first semester or your last.

Important Policies and Procedures to Know

One of the most important things to look into when choosing a college or university is what policies they have in place. This can often get overlooked when enrolling because so many exciting things are happening all at once. Some of the policies we suggest you look into are:

  • Student and Class Policies – This can include policy and procedure documents related to student life at your university for things like student leaves, student misconduct, grading, courses, degrees, and even the quality of campus life for all students. It is vital that you also look into the policies on adding or dropping classes, important enrollment deadlines, and even the refund policy should you need to withdraw from classes. Of course, no one wants to think about bad things happening, but you should be prepared for the unexpected and be aware of what your school can do or not do if something were to happen.
  • Renters and Tuition InsuranceGradGuard offers protection plans designed specifically for the risks of college life. Pipes burst, backpacks get stolen, and illness or injury can keep you from your studies. Many colleges and universities do not offer refunds if a student needs to withdraw from classes after the first few weeks of class. Nearly all schools don’t replace stolen or damaged student property, either. Both of these factors can be detrimental to a student’s success. GradGuard is smart to consider given all of the risks that could happen.

Schedule

Managing a schedule is hard, but you can get the hang of it in no time with some practice. Before classes start or when you have some spare time, take a moment to think about all of the different things on your plate: attending classes, doing homework, studying, sleeping, hanging out with friends, and taking care of yourself; not just by eating the proper meals, but creating a budget or having clean clothes to wear. Details like this can get pushed aside when life becomes hectic, but knowing this ahead of time is an excellent way to ensure they don’t get forgotten. These are all essential everyday things that are vital for us to succeed in life, but can be hard to manage the different elements for the first time on our own. Lean on your friends and family to help you create a schedule that works for your so one of these areas in your life doesn’t suffer.

Work-Life Balance 

A good work-life balance is often talked about, but frequently overlooked. It’s easy to get stuck in the mindset that you must work, work, work all the time. But with all that hustle comes the great need for rest. You must have the appropriate downtime to relax and recuperate after using your body and brain. Eating healthy meals and getting the right amount of sleep is just as crucial to your success as making sure you attend classes and study. If we put out too much energy and don’t give ourselves enough time to unwind, it can lead to bigger problems like excessive stress, weight gain, and even depression. You will need to know your limits and listen to your body when it tells you it is time for a break. It can always be hard to say no in college, but there will always be another chance to do something. If you need to stay home and take care of yourself, your friends will understand! Understanding this concept now will benefit you greatly in the future with your career.

Resources

With this in mind, it can be hard to keep track of important resources and departments you may need in the future. Your college or university most likely will offer many different services or people on campus that you can turn to if you need help getting on the right track. 

  1. Staff – If you need help understanding any university policies, you can reach out to your academic advisor or a faculty member. They have a solid understanding of procedures if there is something that you do not understand.
  2. Study Centers or Resource Labs – There are often many tools available to students that are not well known. If you need help with classes or course material, the university or your specific college may have a tutoring program to assist you when needed. 
  3. Health Services – When you are feeling under the weather or are struggling with your mental health, you can visit your school’s health services facility. This is important if you are sick or if you are having a hard time balancing your workload. They should have doctors and counselors available to you when you need them, and the good news is you don’t have to travel far to get medical help if and when you need it.
  4. Student Handbook -Another place that you may be able to find information you are looking for is in your student handbook. You should read through this at the start of the semester to make sure that you understand the policies and procedures that are in place. This may also include details such as how to join clubs and organizations on campus, give you an idea of surrounding stores and restaurants by campus, and maybe even some student discounts!

There’s a lot of information to consider when you’re first starting college, but it shouldn’t be too overwhelming. Start early and don’t panic; make checklists of the most important stuff to know and you’ll be good to go!

Other Safety

Spring Break Safety Tips

February 16, 2022

After a few months of studying and mid-terms are out of the way, it’s time to kick back and relax for a little something that we like to call spring break. Of course, when we think of spring break, we think of partying or big expensive oversees trips, but there are other options! Whether you’re traveling to somewhere tropical abroad, or have plans to stay in the United States, that’s one essential thing to keep in mind: Safety.

Essential Safety Tips

Keep Your ID on You

It isn’t unusual for students to travel while on spring vacation. Make sure you keep your driver’s license or state-issued identification card on you at all times when you are traveling. If you end up taking an international spring break trip, you’ll want to keep your passport tucked away and out of sight; an inner jacket pocket is a great spot for this. It’s a good idea to bring a paper copy of your passport and safely keep it at your hotel if the original gets lost.

Don’t Travel Alone

The buddy system is crucial when traveling in an unfamiliar place. Staying in a group is one of the simplest ways to avoid becoming a victim of a crime. It’s beneficial for preventing encounters with pickpockets or others who have bad intentions.

It doesn’t matter if you’re going out for a stroll on the beach or are heading to the club; make sure to travel with a friend!

Even if you think someone may be trustworthy, you should still be cautious when making new friends on your trip.

Be Careful with Money and Expensive Items

Traveling with expensive jewelry or handbags is unfortunately another easy way to become a target for crime. Be mindful of what you’re wearing or what electronics you bring with you on your trip. Flashy tourists are easy to spot, especially for thieves waiting to strike.

Try to only carry small amounts of cash on your trip, and don’t keep money out where a pickpocket can reach, like a back pocket or small purse. You will need to be mindful of where your debit card is when you are out to ensure that you don’t lose it, leading to identity theft or lots of expensive charges. Consider leaving the debit card at home and traveling with a credit card instead, since those have better fraud and theft protections in place.

If you really need to travel with a high-value item or a lot of cash, lock it in the trunk of the car during your trip or another place out of sight to keep it safe when your not using it.

Tips for Drinking Responsibly

If you have plans to drink alcohol over spring break, it’s important to know how to do so responsibly. Moderation is key.

Keep these tips in mind to stay safe while drinking:

  • Don’t have more than one drink in an hour. That is a 12 oz beer, 5 oz wine, or 1.5 oz shot. Stick to having less than 2–4 drinks throughout the night. 
  • Eat before you drink and stay hydrated throughout the evening.
  • Stay away from binge drinking, which means consuming four or more drinks in two hours as it can lead to alcohol poisoning and even death.
  • The sun can intensify the effects of alcohol, be extra careful about how much you drink if you’re outside on a sunny day.
  • Be careful if you are in the ocean, a pool, or a hot tub while drinking; Hot tubs will dehydrate you quickly and make the effect of alcohol stronger. 

Finally, do not EVER leave your drink unattended. Unfortunately, date rape drugs are not uncommon among college party scenes — and they are tasteless and odorless. Don’t accept drinks from a stranger or drink out of punch bowls and open pitchers, which could contain extreme volumes of alcohol or spiked with dangerous drugs.

Practice Safe Driving

If you plan on taking a long road trip with friends, arrange to rotate drivers frequently, so everyone stays well-rested. Try to have someone in the passenger seat awake to keep the driver company. Falling asleep at the wheel can be just as dangerous as driving drunk.

Another idea you should consider is to have roadside assistance, whether it’s through a third party like AAA or your car’s warranty. Before setting out on your journey, ensure the vehicle has a spare tire, jack, and other tools needed to change a tire along with the appropriate oil levels and other fluids to function correctly. Hopefully, someone going on the trip knows how to change a tire!

Finally, this goes without saying: Don’t drink and drive. Do not allow your friends to drive if they have been drinking, and you should never get into a car with an impaired driver. There are plenty of ways to travel around and get back home, such as Uber or Lyft. 

Not traveling for Spring Break? No problem!

There are many alternatives to the traditional spring break beach party if you don’t feel like traveling. You can use this time to job shadow, do community service, visit national parks, or even take a staycation.

It can be easy to throw caution to the wind as a college student while on your break, but knowing steps to take to stay safe is important. Being safe doesn’t have to put a damper on your fun, but know that there is such a thing as too much fun, especially when involving drugs and alcohol. 

It might also be a good idea to consider getting travel insurance if you have invested a lot of money into your trip in case something happens. If you have GradGuard Renters Insurance, your belongings will also be safe if they get stolen while you are out of town with our worldwide property coverage!

Safe Travels and have FUN!

Health

How to Support a Friend Struggling with Their Mental Health

January 19, 2022

We all go through periods of self-doubt, feelings of sadness and despair, and a lack of motivation. Sometimes we don’t want to share this with others. Other times, we may have had people there for us. It’s essential to be there for people we love when struggling with their mental health.

The past few years have been difficult for many amidst the pandemic. Many young adults are struggling with their mental health, and it’s important to know what signs to look out for. Read on for what to look for and how to offer support.

21% of U.S. adults experienced mental illness in 2020 (52.9 million people). This represents 1 in 5 adults.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration

Looking Out for Signs

Mental health is a very sensitive subject that many people tend to undermine, and it can be uncomfortable to talk about. Knowing the signs to look out for in your friends who might be struggling with mental health issues is crucial, so we are able to support them when they need us most. Some things to look out for when trying to distinguish when a friend of yours might be struggling with their mental health are sudden changes in behavior, appearance, mood, or actions.

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Adulting Other Transition

How to Manage Bills as a College Student

December 30, 2021

College can be a challenging time for students, but it doesn’t need to be stressful.

College students often struggle to manage their money and pay their bills on time as they move to this new chapter in their life. We are here to help you learn what you need to know about managing your finances as a college student.

Take Note of Every Expense

The first step in budgeting your money is to figure out what your monthly expenses will be.

You will have to pay for housing, utilities, phone service, internet access, and food while you are in college – it’s just the way things work! While different students have different living arrangements, most students will need to pay for these things. You may also need to consider the costs of transportation, textbooks, and other school supplies. Also, don’t forget the costs of any extracurricular activities or hobbies you want to pursue, like joining a club or participating in intramural sports.

From Netflix to the water bill, write down every single monthly expense you have. The more you know about how much all these things cost each month, the better prepared you can be for managing your money.

Begin with Your Fixed Costs

The first type of expense in factor into your budget are the ones that don’t change, or changes very little from month to month. This can include any bills you pay that are not negotiable (meaning the payment cannot be negotiated by a credit card, check, or cash, such as rent payments and car insurance premiums. These are important to remember and can serve as the foundation of your monthly budget.

List your Flexible Expenses

The next step is to determine your variable expenses – these are the monthly bills that change from month to month depending on how much you use. Common examples include utilities, groceries, transportation or gas, and even some cell phone plans. It can be very easy to go over budget with these types of expenses and is crucial that you pay attention to how much you are spending each month.

Plan on Unexpected Expenses

Life happens and you can’t always plan. One thing you should plan for is unexpected expenses, like car repairs or doctor visits. You can do this by setting aside a small amount each month (e.g., $20) in an emergency fund using your checking account. Another way to help the unexpected is to set aside money each month in to a savings account. This can be used for unexpected things you may need, or want, such as trips or a going out to eat that you did not account for in your budget.

Once you have paid all of your bills and set aside this monthly emergency fund, you have reached the end of your spending plan for each month. The amount left over in your checking account is yours to do with as you see fit!

What if money is too tight?

In some situations, budgeting may be difficult and you may not have enough money. If this is the case, it’s important to figure things out as soon as possible – don’t wait until your bills become overdue!

If you need more income to cover expenses, look into getting a job or increasing your hours at work. If you have to cut spending, start with the things that are not as important such as eating out or shopping.

However, attending college is often a full-time job in and of itself. On top of that, it’s important for you as a student to have a healthy amount of free time and disposable income for entertainment and leisure in order to manage the stress of college.

If you have your basic budget under control but need a little leeway for leisure and unexpected expenses, there are plenty of credit cards designed specifically for college students that will help take the pressure off. Just make sure to do your research and compare cards before signing on!

Conclusion

At the end of the day, it can be easy to feel overwhelmed by the number of expenses you have as a college student. However, if you take an organized approach and write down each expense before it becomes due, managing your money should become much easier.

Author Bio

Colin Crown is a contributing writer and media specialist for Compare Credit. He is an avid foodie, marketing enthusiast and loves the city of Memphis.