Browsing Tag

student health

Health Student Life

7 Apps to Use for Better Mental Health

June 20, 2022

We can all agree that the importance of mental health has changed on campus over the past few years, especially after Covid-19. There has always been a stigma surrounding students’ validity and gravity of mental health. Still, this stigma has made progress into becoming an everyday reality as of late.

“During the pandemic, about 4 in 10 adults in the U.S. have reported symptoms of anxiety or depressive disorder, a share that has been largely consistent, up from one in ten adults who reported these symptoms from January to June 2019″.

According to kff.org.

This statistic is proof that the pandemic worsened mental health and spurred an advanced need for new awareness surrounding mental health.

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Health

 Walking For Your Wellness: A Student’s Guide to Mindful Exercises

June 7, 2022

While college provides its fair share of challenges, there are many ways that you put your mind at ease and improve your focus and general mental health. In addition to speaking to a counselor or calling a loved one, you also improve your wellness by taking a walk.

It’s true. While regular exercise can help you maintain a healthy body and strong bones, mindful practices can also help you strengthen your mind and fight the stress that college life can bring. Let’s talk more about what you can add to your health regimen.

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Health Student Life

6 Ways to Take Care of Your Mental Health this Summer

May 30, 2022

As Mental Health Awareness Month is coming to a close, making sure our mental health is a priority should be the focus for the next few months. Over the past few years, I and many others on campus have found that, since the pandemic, student mental health has declined drastically. Even in myself, I discovered that it has become that much more critical for me to set aside time in my schedule to prioritize myself and my own well-being. With all the activities, time, and social interaction lost from the ceaseless pandemic, students’ mental health everywhere has been diminished.

As a college student myself, I have found that there were things I did that helped me maintain good mental health before I got to college last summer and the summer before.

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Health Student Life

Strategies for Prioritizing Mental Health in College

May 16, 2022
five young students sitting together outside

College is a wonderful time in your life. You meet new people, grow beyond your existing ideas, and are constantly working towards the goal of self-improvement. 

But, there’s no doubt that college is stressful, too. Socializing, learning, and developing a career is hard, and accumulating debt can feel overwhelming. 

Combine these stressors with the past few years’ events, and you are sure to feel a little frazzled. 

But, in the long run, college is undoubtedly worth it. You make friendships that last a lifetime and add serious value to your career potential. You’ll also learn to appreciate life in new and novel ways, as that elective in literature might just spark a love of reading and critical thinking. 

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Health Student Life

How to Reduce and Maintain Low Stress Levels in College

May 11, 2022

Can you recall a time you’ve felt pressure to perform to high standards? The stress in high school is different from what comes in college. With the stakes higher, academic stress can sneak up and create many issues for students transitioning into college.

What is Academic Stress?

It’s inevitable that students in college will be stressed, and for many different reasons. Maybe your scholarship requires you to have specific grades to remain eligible, or you’re a first-gen college student, and you feel pressure from your family to do well. The cost of tuition alone can be a financial burden on college families, and maybe yours is also feeling the strain.

This can bring anxiety and thoughts that higher education isn’t worth it or that the responsibility will be too much. We want you to know that feeling this way isn’t unusual and is even shared among many students. But don’t worry, you are not alone in this. We are here to help!

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Health Student Life

Understanding Mental Health for College Students

May 10, 2022
A college student with mental health struggles alone.

What is Mental Health, and Why is it Important to Understand?

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, a time for us to discuss and remember that taking care of our mental well-being is essential. Those living with mental health conditions deserve understanding, respect and compassion, and most importantly, tools for coping, healing, and fulfillment.

What is Mental Health?

According to the CDC, “Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make healthy choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.”

Although the terms are often used interchangeably, poor mental health and mental illness are different. Mental illnesses are diagnosed conditions that affect thoughts and behaviors. Though anyone can have moments of poor mental health, not everyone has a mental illness. A person can experience poor mental health and not be diagnosed with a mental illness. Likewise, a person diagnosed with a mental illness can experience periods of poor physical, mental, and social well-being.

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Student Life Transition

Finding the Good in New and Challenging Situations

April 26, 2022

We’ve all been told that life is a challenge. It can throw you curve balls that you would have never imagined possible, but somehow we all manage to pull through. Although, not always in one piece.

As you move from one phase of your life to the next, you may be experiencing a number of changes:

  • Moving cities or even states.
  • A new job (maybe even your first full-time gig).
  • A boatload of new responsibilities.
  • New friends (or loss of them).

Young adults are inevitably going to trip and fall… A LOT. It’s easy to get discouraged from what may feel like constant letdowns, but remember: It’s okay. Follow these steps for finding the silver lining even in the roughest situations.

When the Going Gets Tough, Be Positive

The energy you put out there is the energy you’ll get back. If you are consistently focusing on the negativity, it will always find you. There will always be something gloomy in life, work, and school, but it is vital to not dwell on those things for too long before trying to find the positive. If you didn’t get the result on a test, you thought you would look for the positive instead of sitting around and moping about it. If something can’t be made positive, try to neutralize it instead.

Failure Can be Good

Our lives are made up of a series of mistakes and the lessons we learn from them. We aren’t born knowing how to walk, talk, read or write. By trial and error, we develop these skills and eventually can’t remember a time we didn’t know how to do them. Unfortunately, the difficulties we face get harder and harder as we get older.

When we make a mistake, big or small, the easiest thing to do is to talk down to ourselves or dwell on all the little clues we missed leading up to this unfortunate event. But remind yourself that we are always learning and growing. Of course, we are going to make a mistake at some point in our lives or another! Whether it’s during the first week on the job, or the first time you have to manage your own finances, you will probably make a mistake. And maybe make many of them. We don’t walk into the world and suddenly have everything figured out. The most important part is learning from those mistakes and ensuring they don’t happen again.

Making an error and failing is an essential piece to mastery. Embrace it.

Be Kind to Yourself

When something negative affects us, it is crucial to accept ownership of what happened, but to also quickly move into a more optimistic headspace. At the same time, it can be comfortable to turn to self-doubt and blame when we do something wrong. We’re only human; we are bound to mess up, but the important thing to remember is that we are not an accumulation of our failures.

Research has shown that talking positively to ourselves, especially when we are at our lowest, is key to overcoming our fears and vital to our mental health.

Some benefits of positive self-talk are:

1. Reduced Stress

Individuals who think optimistically are also more prone to positive self-talk and use more dynamic coping methods when faced with stressful situations and challenges. Positive self-talk helps you challenge the way you look at stressful situations by helping you understand that you will meet them to the best of your ability and that no matter what happens – you did the best you could. Tackling these situations with an ‘I can do this‘ mindset rather than a negative ‘This is too hard‘ opens up new ways of thinking and problem-solving.

 2. Increased Confidence and Resilience

Most of us have experienced the little voice in the back of our heads telling us that we aren’t good enough, but tackling life with a positive self-talk policy can help to boost your self-confidence. Above anyone else, you should be your biggest fan! Frequent positive affirmations will help you feel more confident when facing your fears and achieving your dreams. You instill yourself with the belief that the things you want are achievable, and when situations do arise, you are prepared to handle them head-on. 

3. Stronger Relationships

We all know how it feels to be around someone so bright, full of confidence in themselves, and loves to spread genuine joy. They ooze enthusiasm that bleeds into everyone around them. Positive energy is contagious, so if you bring out the best in yourself, you will also bring out the best in others. 

With all of the challenges college students face, finishing college may not be on the top of the priority list. GradGuard is here to help you find some positivity in what may be some unfortunate circumstances. Insurance provides peace of mind before the unexpected happens, such as having to withdraw from school for a covered medical reason or discovering your laptop was stolen. Renters and tuition insurance plans allow students to get back up when life knocks them down.

Takeaways

You are your biggest champion. At the end of a hard day, week or month, we hope that you are able to find the good. Positivity is infectious, and know you can do anything you set your mind to, even the really hard stuff.

Adulting Student Life

A Student’s Guide to Insurance: Travel Edition

April 19, 2022

Being a student has its fair share of traveling. From breaks, vacations, traveling to and from campus, to even studying abroad. Whether you’re road-tripping to the west coast, studying abroad in Spain, or enjoying the beaches of Southeast Asia, knowing the ins and outs of student insurance can help make your trip a safe one!

There are a few different kinds of insurance you should consider when traveling during school, both in and out of the country: Auto, Health, Renters, and Travel.

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Health Student Life

How to Destress and Take Care of Your Mental Health During Finals Week

April 12, 2022
Learning how to destress during Finals Week

Maintaining good mental health during one of the most stressful times of the year for college students can be tricky, so it’s crucial to have many tips, tricks, and resources to turn to when things become too difficult to handle. 

First things first, avoid burnout and create a healthy routine. With enough time allocated to self-care, it’s important that you maintain good mental health. Stress from school can manifest in many different emotional and physical symptoms, so knowing how to cope with these will give you an edge up. Keep reading for six of the most important healthy ways to reduce stress during finals week, according to Active Minds.

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Student Life

Handling the Stress and Anxiety of Being a Student-Athlete

April 6, 2022

Teens and college-aged students have a lot to deal with every day. There’s a lot to handle, from homework and studying for exams to having a social life and preparing for the future. Student-athletes, however, have another layer of mental strain placed on them. They have to train, practice, manage what they eat, and balance their schedules to make sure they can get everything done. 

So, it should be no surprise that student-athletes often struggle with issues like depression and anxiety more than students who don’t play sports. 

If you’re a student-athlete and struggling with your mental well-being, let’s cover some of the added stressors sports can cause and how you can find healthy ways to cope. 

Are Sports Too Stressful?

Being a student-athlete can be an enriching experience, and there are plenty of benefits to playing sports and staying active. But, they can also negatively impact your mental health if you’re focused so much on the competition that it becomes an obsession. If you lose, it might affect your self-esteem. 

You might even feel excluded at times, from your teammates or from other friends who don’t play sports but think you don’t have time for them because of your busy schedule. It’s hard to balance everything when you already have a full schedule. Combining those factors with the physical exhaustion playing a sport can cause, and it’s easy to feel down and depressed. 

What Can You Do?

With so many other stressors in the life of an average student, how can you handle the stress and anxiety of being a student-athlete? 

First, make sure you still love the sport you’re playing. Even if you’re in a high level of competition, you should still be having fun. If you dread going to practice or resent the way your sport has impacted your life, it might be time to reconsider if it’s right for you. 

If you want to keep playing, the best thing you can do is find ways to manage your stress. Some of the easiest ways to do that include

  • Prioritizing sleep
  • Creating a schedule and honing your time management skills
  • Making time for social activities away from sports
  • Practicing self-care every day


Don’t be afraid to try different things to reduce your stress. Things like mindfulness and meditation are great for relaxation. Even if you’ve never tried them before, it’s not too late to make them a part of your daily routine. When you try new techniques, you’ll eventually find something that works well. 

If you find that you’re really struggling, reach out to your resources. Most college campuses across the country have a mental health and wellness program. Some even have on-campus therapists or counselors that can help you work through your struggles and offer effective coping solutions. 

You don’t have to give up being a student-athlete to deal with stress and anxiety. But, finding ways to manage it while you’re trying to balance everything in your life is important. Take the time to understand the source(s) of your stress, and use the suggestions listed here to handle it in healthy ways.