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Research

Career Uncategorized

Basic Research Skills for Academic Success

March 5, 2019

As a student, you are no stranger to the value of assignments within your academic journey. Assignments are an integral part of every student’s college life and it’s essential to be an expert on writing these. However, most of the time, students can have a knack for writing but get stuck during the research process.

Research is quite an important step of the assignment process. In fact, it is the basic step of composing a good quality essay. For academic success, excellent research skills are quite important and students must polish them to improve and maintain their good grades. Here a few tips to help you.

Categorization and Summarization

The internet is a sea of information. However, you can’t use all of it. Additionally, there is information on almost every topic in the world. You need to know how to categorize the information appropriately according to your assignment topic. After that, you need to summarize the information so you can fit it into your word count along with complimenting all the other relevant requirements.

Critical Thinking

When you are doing an assignment, the whole purpose of it is to form new conclusions and add in a new set of information in the existing one. Therefore, it’s very important for you to think critically so you can form new ideas and also look at the existing information from a new perspective.

Analytical Thinking

Similarly, you must know how to analyze and then use the information for your own papers. There’s a ton of information available on the internet and since not everything can be used. It’s essential that you’re able to analyze different sources and can form an opinion on the quality of the information.

Clear Explanations

Not everyone can easily write out their thoughts and explain them to others. However, if you’re not good at explaining your point you won’t be able to convey your understanding through assignments which can automatically affect your grades. So, it’s important that you have the explanation skills that can help convey your thoughts and understanding into words, in turn letting your teachers easily grade your assignments.

Academic success is important as it could affect a person’s future career. You can’t risk it for anything and the wise thing to do is to polish your research skills, which will help improve your college grades. Don’t forget to follow GradGuard on social media for all of your Tuesday tips and college hacks!

BIO:The professional researcher Mitchell Starc is a qualified writer at Best Cheap Essay Writing Service – 7DollarEssay as well. He has been serving the writing industry for the past 15 years and has expertise in writing on almost all the subjects.

Career Uncategorized

How to Create a Catchy Research Topic

February 5, 2019

Your research topic should be more than just academically justified. Of course, you need to choose the one that relates to a certain field of knowledge and some important questions, however, the topic should also be catchy and interesting. This will make the process of both writing and reading more pleasant. Check these tips and use them to make your research topic stellar.

Top tips on how to choose a good topic

  • Get inspired

Before you start, you should spend a couple of hours in the library, learning more about the filed you are going to work on. Read as much as you can and gather resources from books, encyclopedias, newspapers, journals, and all relevant materials. Be sure you make notes while you read so you don’t forget your ideas later. Getting as much knowledge as you can will help you define the most interesting themes. If something touches you, makes your creative juices flow, and doesn’t go away from your head, then it is a good idea to work on.

  • Pick something that appeals to you

If you don’t feel that a topic evokes something personal in your heart, then you should move on to something else. You can’t make great research without having a little passion for the topic, so be sure to choose something that is meaningful to you. If you are fond of particular authors or segments of knowledge, make sure to stick to them when choosing a topic. Ideas will come to you naturally if you work with sources and materials that you like.

  • Be clear

It is important to express your thoughts in a clear manner, even if you think that your potential readers are aware of the subject you are researching. Nothing ruins the impression of your research more than unclear language. Even if your ideas are complicated, you have to find a way to express them in an engaging manner. Remember, it is always better to be over-communicative than under-communicative

  • Keep your audience in mind

Think about people who are going to read your work. Who are they? What is their potential level of knowledge? Do they even care about the ideas that interest you? Make sure that your topic is something valuable and understandable for your readers, whether they are professors or peers.

  • Be careful with terms

Here is another thing that can spoil readers’ impression about your work – an improper use of the scientific language. Make sure that you know exactly what terms and concepts mean when including them into your text. It’s very embarrassing when someone uses specified language in a wrong way. This makes you look unprofessional and lazy.  If you don’t know the concrete meaning of the word, just read the explanation or don’t use it.

As you can see, the main secret of choosing a really good research topic is picking something that seems valuable and interesting to you. When you are composing a paper with passion, your readers will notice and take more interest in what you are writing about. Who knows, maybe this way you will make someone interested in something new!

GradGuard is here for all your college hacks and Tuesday tips! Be sure to follow us on social media to stay up to date on our blog posts!

BIO: Jennifer Pauli graduated from Corvinus School of Management at Corvinus University of Budapest. Currently, Jennifer is an editor, business writer, and copywriter, working with EssaySpirit.com and other well-known companies, blogs, and personalities.

Student Life Uncategorized

3 Tech Trends For College Students

October 23, 2018

Since college students are actively studying competing for a place in the job market, it’s no surprise new tech trends often appear among them first. The latest in digital communication and security hardware can help you improve the way you access information, experience new ways of learning, and even protect your dorm and belongings. If you’re looking for upcoming technology in education, these trends are on the bleeding edge.

E-texts

The rising cost of textbooks (or the inconvenience of heavy backpacks) is driving up the use of e-books at almost every university. A four-year study conducted by Aimee deNoyelles and John Raible at the University of Central Florida found e-text use was up to 66% of students in 2016, growing year over year. As students get more familiar with digital technology, e-books are becoming a preference.

Many institutions are jumping on the bandwagon. Florida recently launched a $656,000 program to drive up the use of e-texts in state universities. The University of Indiana reports that e-texts saved its students $3.5 million in the 2016–2017 academic year, making information access more affordable and more convenient.

Video Learning and Virtual Reality (VR)

Video has been in classrooms for decades, but developing technologies in video communications are opening new doors for students in 2018. Video education tools like Google Expeditions already provide advanced VR-powered learning tools for teachers across the globe, offering digital tours of far-off historical sites and ecological hotspots. VR in college classrooms provides new ways for students to learn and experience the material.

Video also continues to enable distance learning. Video lectures allow professors to teach in a more engaging way to students taking online courses, which has increased the effectiveness of these types of courses. With distance learning, a college education is more accessible and affordable, especially to people in countries that lack wide offerings of higher education.

Dorm Room Security

Students in universities have already adopted AI techs like Amazon’s Alexa and Apple’s Siri. Now, the latest in home security is making the jump to college dorms. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, there were 27,500 criminal incidents at universities in 2015, an increase from 2014. The risk of losses to personal property is enough to push many students to install security cameras in their dorms.

New smart security cameras offer advanced features like smartphone compatibility and cloud storage that allow you to stream the feed to your phone when you’re not in your dorm room. Voice controls and IFTT compatibility let them link up with other smart devices as well. Remember to do your research and find the system that works best for you.

The Next Big Trend

A lot of our modern digital world traces back to university laboratories and messy dorm rooms. The next big trend in the tech world at large might start somewhere on your college campus this week. But for now, these technological tools are shaping the college experience—at least until next semester. Who knows what innovations might be waiting right around the corner.

Remember to check out GradGuard on social media for all of your college tips and hacks.

Safety Uncategorized

10 Crucial Campus Safety Tips

September 24, 2018

The yearly return to college each fall is an exciting and significant time for students, but it isn’t entirely without risks. This year, as classes beckon you back to campus, consider what you can do to ensure your own safety as well as that of others. September is National Campus Safety Awareness Month! Here’s a quick list to help you promote safety throughout your time at school.

Walk With Purpose

It’s no secret that anyone who appears to be new in town or otherwise unsure of themselves makes an easy target. Don’t be one of those people! Wherever you go, whether on campus or around town, be sure to walk with confidence and a purpose. Be aware of your surroundings at all times, and don’t be afraid to excuse yourself from any situation that makes you feel uncomfortable. Go with your gut: when it comes to your personal safety, you are your own greatest ally.

 

Be the Leader of the Pack

It’s an immutable law of nature: there’s safety in numbers. Traveling with friends is one of the best ways to keep yourself protected, particularly if you’re a young woman who may be at greater risk. This is of critical importance when attending social events or traveling in unlit areas. Whether on or off campus, attend events as part of a group and make a pact to look out for one another. Most importantly, never leave someone alone in a vulnerable or uncomfortable situation. If necessary, leave as a group and make other plans instead.

Be Social Media Savvy

Today our digital personas are just as real as our offline lives, and what happens on the Internet doesn’t necessarily stay there. So in the interest of safety, it’s best to keep the personal details to a minimum. First and foremost, be sure to disable location services so that no one can track your whereabouts as you post. Next, think twice before making any posts that include “sensitive” information. Over 80 percent of Internet-initiated crimes – crimes in which the criminal first identifies or tracks a target online – begin through social media, making your profiles excellent resources for any would-be criminals to find your location, daily routines and nearly anything else they might want to know.

“I’ll Be Back”

Whenever you venture out and about, make sure that someone knows where you’re going and when you expect to be back. It only takes a few moments to text friends or family members and inform them of your plans, and if something should ever go wrong, you’ll be glad that you did. If you don’t show up when and where you’re expected, having someone who can check in on you can make all the difference.

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Safety Uncategorized

10 Crucial Campus Safety Tips

August 17, 2017

The yearly return to college each fall is an exciting and significant time for students, but it isn’t entirely without risks. This year, as classes beckon you back to campus, consider what you can do to ensure your own safety as well as that of others. September is National Campus Safety Awareness Month! Here’s a quick list to help you promote safety throughout your time at school.

Walk With Purpose

It’s no secret that anyone who appears to be new in town or otherwise unsure of themselves makes an easy target. Don’t be one of those people! Wherever you go, whether on campus or around town, be sure to walk with confidence and a purpose. Be aware of your surroundings at all times, and don’t be afraid to excuse yourself from any situation that makes you feel uncomfortable. Go with your gut: when it comes to your personal safety, you are your own greatest ally.

Be the Leader of the Pack

It’s an immutable law of nature: there’s safety in numbers. Traveling with friends is one of the best ways to keep yourself protected, particularly if you’re a young woman who may be at greater risk. This is of critical importance when attending social events or traveling in unlit areas. Whether on or off campus, attend events as part of a group and make a pact to look out for one another. Most importantly, never leave someone alone in a vulnerable or uncomfortable situation. If necessary, leave as a group and make other plans instead.

Be Social Media Savvy

Today our digital personas are just as real as our offline lives, and what happens on the Internet doesn’t necessarily stay there. So in the interest of safety, it’s best to keep the personal details to a minimum. First and foremost, be sure to disable location services so that no one can track your whereabouts as you post. Next, think twice before making any posts that include “sensitive” information. Over 80 percent of Internet-initiated crimes – crimes in which the criminal first identifies or tracks a target online – begin through social media, making your profiles excellent resources for any would-be criminals to find your location, daily routines and nearly anything else they might want to know.

“I’ll Be Back”

Whenever you venture out and about, make sure that someone knows where you’re going and when you expect to be back. It only takes a few moments to text friends or family members and inform them of your plans, and if something should ever go wrong, you’ll be glad that you did. If you don’t show up when and where you’re expected, having someone who can check in on you can make all the difference.

Do Your Research

Every campus has resources available to help keep you safe, but they aren’t of much use if you aren’t aware of them. Take some time to find out where your local campus safety or police station is located and be sure to save the phone number. Also familiarize yourself with any other useful services, such as psychological services and wellness centers. It’s also a good idea to locate any emergency phones and automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) on campus. A sudden cardiac arrest can happen to anyone at any time, and people who are quickly treated with an AED are five times more likely to survive.

Take Advantage of Safety Technology

If you haven’t done so already, sign up to get campus text alerts sent directly to your phone. These alerts will help you stay abreast of any incidents on your campus and will provide valuable safety information if necessary. Additionally, consider downloading a personal safety app to turn your phone into a pocket-sized security guard. There are many options available, all with their own feature sets, but the general idea is the same: these apps provide a way to stay in touch with friends and family, alert them to your plans and location and even send emergency alerts if you’re in need of help.

Lock It Up

There are thousands of burglaries on college campuses each year, and many of them could be prevented with one simple step: lock your doors! Make sure your roommates also understand the importance of keeping your dorm locked up securely, and never give out a key to anyone else. If you live off campus, or in a sorority or fraternity house, consider installing a basic video surveillance system or doorbell camera. If an intruder sees they’re being watched it’s a powerful deterrent, and it’ll also allow you to remotely view any visitors – unwanted or otherwise – right from your phone or mobile device.

Be Skeptical of Unknown Substances

Whether you’re out partying hard or simply looking for some Tylenol for a headache, never trust pills, liquids or other substances unless you know exactly what they are. It’s always better to pass on someone’s offer rather than risk consuming a spiked drink, a dangerous drug or some other foreign substance. Similarly, never put your drink down at a house party or in a bar.

Get Defensive

Many campuses and community centers offer free self-defense classes, and they’re well worth your time. Even if you hope never to need it, knowing how to respond quickly and effectively in the event of a physical threat is potentially life-saving. It doesn’t matter if you’re male or female – everyone could use a few tips from the experts, and if you witness potential acts of violence as a bystander this knowledge could help you prevent an assault from occurring.

Equip Yourself

There’s something to be said for preparing for the worst, and that’s exactly what personal defense items accomplish. Whether it’s a small canister of pepper spray or a safety whistle, it’s worth it for peace of mind to carry one or more non-lethal defense items with you when you’re out and about.

Whether you’re finishing your degree or shipping off to college for the first time, it’s important to make sure you’re properly prepared. With the simple tips above, you can feel confident in your ability to stay safe, protect yourself from whatever comes your way, and remember that GradGuard has your back!

 

Emma Bailey is a freelance writer and blogger based in Chicago, IL. A Midwest transplant from the state of California, she typically writes on the social justice issues that are closest to her heart. Her interests include kayaking, watching horror movies, and finding perfectly ripe avocados. You can find her on Twitter @emma_bailey90

Transition Uncategorized

Half of Students Entering College Worry They Won’t Graduate

August 13, 2017

Forty-Eight percent of students and their parents think they may need to withdraw from school.

According to recent survey results announced by Allianz College Confidence Index, “prospective college students are arriving on campus already doubting their ability to reach graduation with nearly half anticipating the need to either temporarily or permanently withdraw from their degree program.”

The findings reveal that 48 percent are less than very confident they will finish college without dropping out permanently and 55 percent think they will need to take at least some time off.

The Allianz Tuition Insurance College Confidence Index survey results also revealed:

Nearly half (43 percent) of current students indicate they’ve thought about withdrawing; The majority (53 percent) are less than very confident they will graduate within four years; and Parents, too, anticipate the likelihood that withdrawal might be necessary. More than half of all parents surveyed (52 percent) lacked full confidence that their student will graduate within four years.

A lot at stake for parents
“There’s a lot at stake for parents and students, including the possibility of suffering a financial loss from dropping out. If students want to return to school, some families may not be able to fund the additional semesters needed to graduate,” said Joe Mason, chief marketing officer at Allianz Global Assistance. “Over one-hundred colleges and universities rely on Allianz to provide tuition protection to increase their students and families’ confidence and peace of mind.”

Students and parents alike realize that the implications of additional, unplanned semesters are significant: 85 percent agree that the financial repercussions of withdrawing could be severe. Among those surveyed, the average financial loss resulting from college withdrawal was estimated to be more than $11,000. Additionally, 10 percent of respondents estimate their potential loss to be at least $25,000.

Current and prospective college students identified the following as the most likely reasons they may withdraw from their college program:

Family emergency – 69 percent
Stress – 66 percent
Mental health condition – 66 percent
Physical health condition – 60 percent

“After a certain point in the semester, most universities refund only a partial amount of tuition paid by students and their families. Fortunately, tuition insurance provides a refund to families for both tuition and other academic expenses when students unexpectedly are forced to leave school for a reason covered by their policy,” said Mason.

Additional survey findings reveal:
Just 52 percent of students said they’re “very confident” they won’t permanently withdraw from college at some point; Parents and students often aren’t aware of their current (or prospective) school’s refund policy – half indicate no awareness, and just one in eight respondents (16 percent) say they are very confident they know it; and
Nearly 8 in 10 parents (78 percent) say they’d be worried about making student loan payments if their child had to withdraw from their college program.

 

Methodology
These are some of the findings of an Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Allianz in May 2017. For the survey, a sample of n=2,004 Americans (college students age 17-25: n=1,001 and parents n=1,003 were interviewed online via Ipsos’s American online panel. The precision of Ipsos online surveys is measured using a Bayesian credibility interval. In this case, with a sample of this size, the results are considered accurate to within ± 2.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, of what they would have been had all American college students (prospective and current) and parents been polled. The credibility interval will be larger within sub-groupings of the survey population.