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Career Other

4 Modern HR Tools Recruiters Are Using That Every Applicant Should Know About

April 10, 2020

As you begin your career search, preparing your resume, preparing for interviews, and choosing your professional attire will likely be the most important things on your mind. However, with new technology emerging in the human resources industry, a new set of requirements and preparations could arise for job applicants. Being prepared for what these changes may mean for you could help you land the job you want.

Here are five of the modern HR tools that recruiters are using nowadays that every applicant should know: 

Social Media

Social media is becoming a popular means of recruitment for companies of all sizes. There are a variety of ways in which a recruiter can benefit from using social media, such as:

  • Advertising open positions
  • Sourcing candidates
  • Highlighting company culture
  • Screening candidates 

You must use caution when posting online. Not only are companies looking to see what you are talking about or what you may be like, but they are often looking for any red flags that may stick out on your social profiles. A company could end up deciding not to hire a candidate solely based on something they found online

Talent Management Software

When considering the large number of applications that employers usually receive for any given position, they need to have a central processing system that can handle large sets of data. 

By using talent management software to process candidates appropriately, candidates are kept up to date with any hiring decisions as they’re made. This software also provides applicants with an easily accessible hub for gathering information and completing files in the hiring process. Once an applicant is hired, this software can be used for the entirety of the onboarding process and even throughout their tenure at the company. 

Resume Screening Tools

A resume screening tool automatically processes your resume to see if it is a potential match for the job description based on keywords the employer has chosen to screen for. Applicants with the best matches are then put into a smaller pool to be reviewed by the recruiter. Resumes that do not match the criteria, whether they are a fit or not, usually do not receive a second look. 

For employers, this can help limit the often-large selection of applications they receive, but for qualified candidates, it could cause them to miss out on seemingly perfect opportunities. Because of this, it’s important to tailor your resume for each position

Automated Background and Reference Checks

As automation technology continues to advance, more companies are finding ways to use it to increase efficiency across their business. In recruitment, this can be especially beneficial for running background checks and contacting references.  

Businesses can use this technology to automatically scan any registered databases and verified systems to see if your name appears alongside anything worrisome, such as criminal records or false social security numbers. 

For your references, automation ensures a smooth communicative process so the business can send them pre-populated questions they can answer and send back quickly. This can help prevent candidates from being held up in this portion of the hiring process. 

Video Conferencing for Interviews

In the modern world, work situations are becoming unique to each employee. With the introduction of video conferencing tools for interviewing purposes, more applicants can apply to positions of interest to them, no matter their location. 

This can be extremely beneficial for you as an applicant if you live in a different location than the position you are applying for and are looking to relocate or work remotely.

Because technology in recruiting has increased significantly over time, you must consider how prospective employers will view your application and interview. Enlist the help of professionals to ensure your application has the potential to stand out at the top of any employer’s list.

Health Other

The Doctor is Out: Non-Medical Career Paths in Healthcare

March 9, 2020

Maybe you’ve always thought about a career in medicine, but blood isn’t really your thing. Or maybe you’ve actually embarked on a career as a healthcare provider, but the road is long, and you’ve got to make ends meet while you chase your dreams. The good news is you have a lot of options for pursuing a career in the healthcare industry outside of the practice of medicine itself.

Think About What You Want

As you explore your options in the healthcare industry, you’ll want to consider not only what kind of work you want to do, but also what you need from your job. Before you accept a job, you need to ensure they offer a benefits package that serves you today as well as tomorrow, especially if you’re considering staying for the long haul. Ensuring that your prospective employers offer benefits, such as retirement and medical, dental, and vision insurance, can help protect you now and well into the future.

The Good Enough Job

If you’re not yet ready to settle into your forever job, you can still find great ways to make a solid living while you work toward your ultimate career goals. For example, if you’re a medical student looking to earn some income and garner some experience in the healthcare industry, there are a lot of great sites you can turn to. Major job boards like Indeed and Monster can help you tailor your job search to your particular requirements, while other sites like College Recruiter are dedicated specifically to helping undergraduate and graduate students connect with prospective employers.

Turning a Job into a Career

If you’re ready to start your career now instead of waiting on that advanced degree or those years of clinical training, you don’t have to abandon the healthcare industry to do it. There are endless options for stable, well-paying, and richly rewarding jobs in the healthcare industry. For instance, if computers, as well as healthcare, are at the top of your interests, then why not combine them by pursuing a career in Big Data and healthcare AI?

Or you may want to be a bit more hands-on while sparing yourself the rigors of med school. Studies show that careers in home health are among the most in-demand and fastest-growing in the US. Or, if you’re ready to commit yourself to a bit more time in school, you can build an exciting and very lucrative career with a Masters’s degree in health law and policy!

The Takeaway

Even if you feel a career in medicine isn’t for you, that doesn’t mean you have to abandon your interest in the healthcare field. Whether you’re looking for a temporary job in the industry to make ends meet while you cultivate vital professional experience, or you’re hoping to launch your professional career, your options are virtually endless. The healthcare industry has something in it for just about everyone, from health AI and Big Data to home healthcare to health law. So do a little exploring to find the career path that’s tailor-made for you!

Other Transition

What You Need to Know About Applying for College

February 28, 2020

After 12 years of general education, the time has come to join the big leagues. No matter what degree you’re aiming for, going to college can be exciting and frightening at the same. It all starts with you trying to find a reputable college.

If this is your first time applying to college, you might be feeling a little nervous and confused. However, it doesn’t have to be this way. Your college experience should always be an exciting experience.

Here’s what you need to know about applying for college.

Research Early On

You don’t have to wait until you graduate high school to look for a college. In fact, it’s recommended that you search during your time in high school. You should spend a majority of your junior year in high school looking for colleges.

Your senior year should primarily focus on learning the admission process. The admission process can vary, so it’s important to research each college and its requirements. This is where college admissions counseling comes in. They’ll help you set up everything and guide you through the process.

Determine Whether You Should Take the SAT or ACT

Once you’ve figured out what college you want to attend, the next thing you need to consider is what test to take. You can either take the SAT or the ACT. Both of these tests are used as an entryway into most colleges and go over the same subjects. The only real difference is how they’re scored. SATs are scored using a scale between 600 to 2400 while the ACTs measure scores by using 1 to 36.

In general, it doesn’t really matter which test is taken as most colleges take both of them. It’s just that some students do better with the SATs than the ACTs and vice versa. It is possible to take both of them. In fact, taking both of these tests can increase the likelihood of you getting accepted.

Be Ready to Face Rejection

If you get rejected by your college, don’t get discouraged. You can always apply again. But don’t sit around waiting for one college to accept you. Just because one college gave you a rejection doesn’t mean all of them will.

Sure, it may be a little heartbreaking to know that after all of the hard work you’ve done, all you received was a rejection letter. However, even the best of the best get rejections too. They could have the perfect grades and credentials, but the college rejected them anyway.

Applying to college is an exciting process, but it can also be very difficult. So, it’s important that you start off on the right foot. These tips aim to help you achieve just that.

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Other Transition

5 Tips For Succeeding In College As A Veteran

February 10, 2020

Current and newly transitioning service members who assume control of their college careers may initially find it a challenge. When you’re accustomed to following a regimented schedule, it can be tough managing study sessions, test preparation, assignments and interaction with new peers. Yet, the discipline and training that you’ve honed during your service — such as time management, attentiveness, and organization — can give you an edge in succeeding as a student.

As a veteran, you’re also empowered in a unique way. You have a singular worldview as a result of your experience and access to benefits that other students aren’t eligible for, such as the GI Bill. If you’re ready to pursue your degree, here are five tips for succeeding in college as a veteran.

1. Develop a Plan

Planning is key when preparing for military operations, and taking the next steps in your education is no different. Prospective students should contact their schools of choice for academic advising. An advisor can help answer questions about a particular area of study or degree plan. This ensures that you take the proper subjects in order to earn your degree. To be a successful student, consult with your professors and advisors about your course options before registering for classes.

2. Connect With a Veteran’s Administrator About Your Benefits

If you’ve been on active duty for at least two years, you’re entitled to certain benefits through the GI Bill. The bill provides students with a direct monthly payment they can use to cover fees, tuition, books, and other costs. Be sure to find the veteran’s office on campus, where you can connect with an administrator to discuss your unique situation. A veteran’s administrator can guide you through the process of claiming your benefits and the various documents you need to complete.

3. Create a Network

College is the ideal place to begin building a network of peers and future professionals. These connections, made both in and out of the classroom, can help you with your career trajectory. Networking is also a great way to find mentors who can provide valuable advice for your goals and point you in the right academic direction. A mentor could also help reduce culture shock, open the door to new opportunities and introduce you to new people.

4. Utilize Military-Specific Student Groups

Connecting with a military community on campus can help new veterans relate to the challenges of transitioning into college and civilian life. Many institutions of higher learning offer veteran-specific orientations, classes and organizations, which can serve as a support system and source of comfort. Bonding with peers from similar backgrounds can also make a veteran student’s academic career more rewarding.

5. Get Involved

While a strong support network is important, don’t let your military group be the only individuals you interact with on campus. Daily contact with new people from various backgrounds can help enrich your experience. Getting involved in organizations such as sports leagues, honor societies, fraternities or sororities and civic or cultural groups is a great way to meet new people, discover your passions and unwind from the stresses of school.

College doesn’t have to be an unfamiliar, foreign ordeal after your time in the military. Today’s universities offer veterans convenient ways to gain the education they desire. By taking the right steps and utilizing the resources available, a veteran can successfully transition into life as a student.

Bio: Jeremy Silverstein is Vice President of Operations and Vehicle Dispatching at Veteran Car Donations. During the years he’s been with the organization, he has become quite an expert in the industry and has handled tens of thousands of donated vehicles.

Career Other

8 Tips for Writing an Engaging Cover Letter

November 14, 2019

The average recruiter spends about 7 seconds looking at a resume. With such a time constraint, you might be tempted to leave out the cover letter altogether when applying for jobs. But before you do that, know that your cover letter is what helps recruiters see you as an actual person. And not just another faceless name in a pile of generic applications. 

That being said, writing cover letters can be daunting for even the best of us. So, to get you started, here are a few tips to help you write an engaging cover letter that draws in recruiters and gets you the coveted first interview

1. Know Who You’re Writing To

Cover letters that read like conversational letters are more likely to appeal to recruiters and hiring managers on a personal level. So make sure to directly address the person on the job ad in your cover letter. 

If a name isn’t mentioned, search for the HR or relevant department personnel’s profiles on LinkedIn or Twitter, and address the letter to them.  HR Departments in some companies can even tell you about the right person if you call in. However, when in doubt, writing ‘Dear HR Manager’ is always a safe option. 

2. Be Original from The Start

Avoid starting with something as generic, obvious and space-wasting as: ‘I am writing this letter in response to your ABC advertisement for XYZ position’. Instead, summarize who you are (and no, that doesn’t include mentioning your name) and why you would be the best fit for the position in the first 2 lines. For instance, it can start something like this: “As a fashion enthusiast graduating with a high CGPA in the field, I was excited to see your advertisement for Junior Designer”.    

3. Use Keywords as Clues

Job advertisements are quite descriptive and can be used to your advantage when writing the follow-up to your stellar introduction. Use the keywords in the job description to write a personalized and relevant description of your skills and experience. This helps the HR manager see that you’re a good fit, and also makes the main body easier to write and organize. 

4. Be Precise, Simple, and Consistent

Avoid going past the one-page limit. While it may seem too short, this will help freshen and streamline your cover letter, and keep it from becoming a repetition of your resume. Also, while it’s good to insert a few field-related terms, avoid peppering the letter with technical jargon. This will only confuse the HR personnel who reads it, hence leaving a bad impression.   

5. Be Skill Savvy

As a fresh graduate, you may not have enough work experience to base an entire cover letter around it. Instead, select 2-4 of your skills that are most relevant to the position. Then explain each in 2-3 sentences with an example from school, your previous internship, or volunteer work. This will keep your cover letter fresh, and distinctly different from your resume.  

6. What Can YOU Do for The Company?

Companies. don’t want to know how much you admire them. What they do want to know is how your particular skills can contribute towards their organization. Devote a major part of your letter to explaining how you can improve their current processes, and what challenges you can help them overcome. This is where your research skills will come in handy. 

Use the organization’s online presence to your advantage by exploring the company’s website, along with looking up journals, articles, and websites relevant to the company. This will help you understand what the company, particularly your intended department, needs and any potential problems you might be able to solve. 

7. Be Confident

A cover letter’s main purpose is to convince recruiters that you are a good fit for the company and department. This means replacing words like ‘feel’ and ‘believe’ with more assertive terms to communicate your confidence in your skills and experience. 

8. Have A CTA

Conclude your cover letter on a positive note by thanking the reader, and politely encouraging them to contact you for an interview. Exhibit your enthusiasm and keenness on getting to meet and discuss with them in person. If it’s a speculative application, consider adding a follow-up statement to let them know when you’ll call back to confirm receipt of your application. 

Writing cover letters gets easier with practice. Use the above tips, your personal experience, and judgment to write an engaging cover letter that is sure to catch the recruiters’ eyes. 

BIO: Amanda Jerelyn is a recruitment specialist and an authority on hiring management who is currently working as an Academic Advisor at King Essay. She is also a fashion enthusiast who spends her spare time designing leather products for her website premiumjackets.com.

Other Transition

Recent Grads’ Guide to Homeownership

November 6, 2019

There are so many things to look forward to upon graduating from college, like new careers, new cities, new friends, and much more! Life after college looks different for everyone, but for some, the first big step might be a transition from dorm-dweller to homeowner. In which case, we’re here to help you plan your next move (literally).

Decide Where to House Hunt

Determining the type of house you want to buy as well as its location can be almost as challenging as it was choosing your major in college. Start by researching important aspects of different areas like safety ratings and median home values. Then, narrow down choices based on other criteria important to you. Is the commute distance to your first post-grad job reasonable? Is there enough nightlife to help you make new friends after college?

Think Long-Term

Don’t feel the pressure that your first home needs to be your dream house or forever home. Instead, a starter home is a perfect option for first-time buyers—especially someone fresh out of college—as they are generally smaller in size and more budget-friendly. Ideally, you should live in a starter home for at least five years and plan to complete a few home improvement projects along the way. 

Even if it’s not on your radar at the moment, home remodeling updates can help you get the most resale value for your home once you outgrow it. In general, kitchen updates are one of the most value-adding renovations—and are do-able even with a low-income entry-level job. To help you budget accordingly, take a look at the average project costs for minor kitchen remodels. Remember, you should only spend 5–15% of your property’s total value if you plan on selling in the near future.

Consider Financial Factors

With all of the transitions of life after college and the excitement of potentially owning a home, it’s not uncommon to overlook various expenses. Therefore it’s vital to plan early and thoroughly. Be sure to research the additional costs of purchasing a home, which may include:

  • Down payments
  • Property taxes
  • Homeowners’ insurance

More importantly, consider how your personal finances will change after college and what you need to account for in your budget. Examples include:

  • Student loan repayments
    • Is your six-month grace period for your federal student loans coming to an end?
    • Are you on an income-based repayment (IBR) plan? If so, it might be more challenging to get approval for a mortgage.
  • Health insurance
    • Is your student health plan ending?
    • Are you in the middle of a health coverage gap until your post-grad job benefits kick in?

Assess Your Credit

Once you establish your budget, it’s time to begin the mortgage process. When you apply for a mortgage loan, most lenders start by looking at your FICO scores—a summary of your credit report. The type of loan you qualify for will depend on your credit score, but the higher your credit score, the higher your chances are of getting approved. Most grads don’t build a credit history until after college; But to remain in good standing, below are tips to improve your credit before applying for a mortgage:

  • Pay off any existing credit card balances
  • Avoid making purchases with credit cards (i.e., using available credit)
  • Don’t apply for credit elsewhere that will generate a hard inquiry (ex: credit cards, car loans)
  • Consistently make all payments on time, especially student loans

Buying a home is an exciting and expensive investment that will undoubtedly impact your future, so take these considerations into account when searching for your first home and don’t rush the process. 

Health Other

Why College Students Can’t Sleep

October 25, 2019

It seems that sleeping and college life just do not go together since sleeping is something that almost every student fails to do at some point. When did sleeping regularly become harder than studying? Are students studying so hard that they do not have enough time to sleep? Sleep problems in college students are not a surprise, but students should not neglect them, because lack of sleep during college can leave consequences that will affect their life even when their college days are over.

What Is Keeping Students up All Night?

When we hear that college students are not sleeping well, we immediately assume that that is the case because they are partying too much. And sometimes that is true, parties are a part of their lifestyle, but we cannot blame it all on partying every time. Many students are facing some other challenges that are not letting them sleep well. Some of them have to work part-time, some take a packed load course, others are dealing with stress or an eventful social life, etc. 

What is common is that a lot of students like to pull an all-nighter, trying to learn as much as possible in the last few hours before the exam. However, this usually turns against them. Because when students are sleep deprived, they are more prone to mistakes. They have issues concentrating or thinking clearly, which is why getting at least 7 hours of sleep before an exam is always important.

College life is challenging and stressful in so many ways, and some students just can’t take the pressure. Due to that, many of them are suffering from mental health disorders, such as depression and anxiety; those conditions often tend to trigger sleep disorders such as insomnia. But the relationship between sleep and mental health disorders goes in both ways, so students should not ignore any symptoms.

Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

It all starts with skipping classes occasionally because you’re unable to wake up on time in the morning. Then comes the poor grades on exams, and eventually, some people even drop out of college because they can’t keep up anymore. Lack of sleep is seriously jeopardizing the performance of college students. But if you get used to it, and it becomes a part of your lifestyle, you will be stuck in that vicious circle for a long time. 

Besides poor academic performance, sleep deprivation leaves more permanent marks on our health. You can develop numerous sleep disorders, and your immune system will weaken, you are at risk of diabetes, heart disease, depression, and anxiety. There is life after college, and students need to think about their future and take care of their health.

Learning How to Sleep

If you can prepare for an exam in less than a week, you can surely learn how to sleep. If you are used to staying up late, falling asleep at a proper time will be hard in the beginning, harder than staying up all night. But, you can do it, everyone can. Once you notice the benefits, such as fresh look on your face, alertness, improved memory, and academic performance, you will never wish to skip sleeping again.

Author’s Bio:

Selena Thomas is a content writer who loves sharing tips on healthy lifestyles. A writer by day and a reader by night, she’s fond of writing articles that can help people in improving both physical and mental health. Also, she loves traveling and inspires people on her blogs.

Health Other

5 Perfect Dog Breeds For Students

October 15, 2019

You may have had a dog all your childhood and are considering bringing one into your life as a student. Not surprisingly, you’re wondering which breeds are best to suit your lifestyle.

Before we get into the personalities and temperaments of some truly impressive dogs, as a student, you must consider whether you have the time and budget to care for a new addition.

Tips For Students Adopting a Dog

How Much Time Do Dogs Take?

Most dogs need around 60 minutes of exercise per day and certain breeds have high grooming requirements, taking at least 30 minutes of your day, every day.

All dogs require training. If you are opting for a puppy, this will be a large portion of your time, along with socialization.

Will you be prepared to head out on the mid-night toileting ventures? And is it viable to let your puppy out every 1-2 hours during the day as part of their toilet training routine?

Be Realistic

Being a student is stressful at the best of times, you have essays, mid-terms and are often trying to juggle a part-time job along with a social life.

You must be realistic, how does a dog or puppy fit into that? 

Can You Afford A Dog?

Can you also afford their care? Dog’s eat, a fair amount if they are a large breed. 

They also need routine veterinary care like shots, boosters, flea/worm treatments, annual check-ups, etc. This doesn’t include the monthly insurance costs to cover in an emergency or if your dog suffers a significant health issue. 

Then there are the small things, that soon add up, like bowls, leashes, collars, bedding, blankets, toys, chews etc. Puppies have a tendency to chew so you may find yourself replacing items sooner than planned! We’re not even talking about your roommates’ shoes that you need to replace as pup chewed them.

Which Breeds Are The Best?

If you are sure you can meet the care needs of your puppy, without leaving them alone for too long between lectures, study sessions and your part-time job, then there are a few breeds who are better suited to student living than others.

Chances are, your student accommodation is going to be on the smaller side, so a smaller breed would be more appropriate.

5. The Bedlington Terrier

Docile and laid back, these guys are super-adaptable and renowned for simply going with the flow. 

Despite them being a terrier, they aren’t as feisty as most. They are lively and energetic when out on walks, and always up for the next adventure. The Bedlington is also low shedding which means it won’t cause too much mess in your student digs! 

They are happy with upwards of 60 minutes exercise per day but are more than happy to curl up in a ball on their return! They come in quite high on grooming requirements, so budget regular visits to the salon when deciding if you can take one on!    

4. The Chug

The adorable cross between the Chihuahua and Pug, this small little guy won’t take up much room at all. They are super-friendly and confident, so having plenty of roomies milling around won’t phase them in the slightest. They aren’t the most active breed, and they struggle to regulate their temperature in the heat, so shorter walks are generally better for these guys. 

Be mindful if you are in a warm part of the state though, and your budget won’t cover the AC costs – these guys are prone to heatstroke. 

3. Beagle Lab Mix 

If you’re athletic and into sports, you’re more than happy spending your time outdoors and exercising. You’ll certainly need to if you take the Beagle Lab Mix on! 

This guy is super friendly and playful, but thanks to the determination of the Beagle, he’ll certainly keep you on your toes. Beagles need to be busy – so take up agility or scent work with this dog! If he’s not kept occupied he can become destructive, so you need to think long and hard before you take this guy on.

2. The Patterdale Terrier

These intelligent and feisty guys are perfect companions for those active students. They can be quite aloof, so providing their exercise needs are met, they are more than happy chilling on their own for a couple of hours. 

They are incredibly loyal, so be mindful if you have plenty of new people visiting regularly – they may take a liking to barking! Stubborn as they come, you need a solid understanding of dog training to get to grips with this guy!

A huge personality in a small body – one to certainly keep you on your toes. 

1. Golden Retriever or Labrador

A slightly bigger dog for those in more spacious accommodation, a Golden Retriever or Labrador is super friendly and sociable – they will happily accept every visitor you have!

Upwards of 60 minutes of exercise per day will keep these guys happy, but they are more than happy to come back home and chill out afterward. Super trainable and eager-to-please, this pup will be the firm favorite on campus!

Before you decide to take a dog on as a student, you must consider whether you have the time and budget to fully care for his needs. If so, consider one of our top breeds for students and don’t forget to give them a great name too! Considering pet insurance is never a bad idea either.

As always, remember to choose a breed that will suit your lifestyle and experience as a handler, as your studies should always come first. However, having a furry friend around can help boost your spirits and encourage you to be more social at college.

BIO: Robert Woods is an avid fish keeper and advocate for all things fish related, including the many mental health benefits which can be derived from keeping fish.

Other Transition

Top 5 Way to Save Money After College

October 3, 2019

There are 3.6 million college graduates living in poverty, and it’s to be expected given not only factors such as student loans and other college-related debt, but also the difficulties one might experience when obtaining a job in their field or the starting wages at these jobs.

Creating a Budget

You hear it all the time and not to be a broken record, but creating a budget is the first step to saving money, especially as you start paying back student loans or other debts. Right now you’re probably getting notifications that you need to start paying off your loans, you’re having to move out of student housing, and basically, this whole being-an-adult-thing is about to get a lot harder!

You can do this though! And the first step is creating that budget. It doesn’t need to be fancy. You can even use a free template on Excel or Google Docs. Make sure to carefully document all sources of income and all expenses, even the ones you might want to ignore. If you’re not sure where to start on paying your student loan debt, there are great calculators and resources available.

Saving $$$ on Food

Don’t worry, you don’t have to eat ramen the rest of your life — although there are some fun ways to spice up that cost-effective meal! But a good chunk of your expenses may be coming from food. Apps like Mint actually track how you spend your money and you might be surprised to see how often you eat out or how much those “treat yourself” items at the grocery store are costing you. A great way to avoid those last-minute splurges is creating yourself a meal plan with a shopping list, allowing yourself to be only one spur-of-the-moment item.

Meal planning isn’t just for being healthy, although that can be a great perk, but it’s great for time management and budgeting. Simple, cheap meal plans will help you save without living off rice, beans, and ramen!

Cut Back on Utility Bills

A lot of us may have had the luxury of free or discounted internet and TV while living in student housing, but now that we’ve graduated, we’re having to deal with these bills on our own. A great way to cut down bills is to really examine what you need: Do you really watch cable or do you watch Netflix or Hulu? You might even be able to cut down on your internet speeds. An internet connection with 5mbps, though not ideal, is enough to stream and browse the internet.

Getting Married? Don’t Worry!

And then there’s the biggest expense of all—marriage! If you’re one of those ‘lucky’ ones about to make the big commitment dive into marriage, you’re probably stressed about a long list of expenses ranging from booking a venue, the cost of a wedding dress, and all the things that come after. What if you don’t get the things you need most on your registry? And if you’re the one getting to propose, you might be worried about the cost of a ring. The good news is, it doesn’t have to be that complicated!

There is even a list of venues that won’t cost an arm and a leg. And if you’re still looking for that special ring you might consider an eternity band that offers special financing and a wide array of options for various budgets.

 Creating Long-Term Goals and Building Credit

Two of the most important things to consider after graduating from college are your long-term goals and how you’re going to obtain them. One of the biggest factors for obtaining our long-term goals (such as buying a house) is building our credit. There are important factors to pay attention to when building your credit, such as staying on top of your student loan payments, credit card usage, and ways to avoid negative marks are your credit. There are also options for credit repair if you’re already suffering from negative items on your credit report.

Whatever your goals may be, there are many paths to take, even when you’re fresh out of college and still sorting everything out. If you start saving now and planning for those special life plans, there’s nothing you can’t achieve! 

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Career Other

Gen Z is in the Building: What New Employees are Looking for in the Workplace

July 22, 2019

Born between 1996 and 2010, Gen Z is just starting the process of graduating and entering the workforce. While we’re well aware of what millennials value in the workplace, a whole new understanding of what Gen Z individuals want, and how they work, is imperative. Early research has shown that this generation appreciates a social, flexible yet professional work culture. If your company doesn’t plan to adjust its culture to prepare for these young professionals, you run the risk of losing out on their creative ideas and fresh insights. 

What can your company do to attract new Gen Z employees?

Implement Flexible Working Arrangements

Gen Z most craves the ability to work from anywhere and outside of traditional 9–5 hours. While they value hard work, friends, travel, and fitness are also very important to this group, so they often seek jobs that offer a healthy work-life balance. Gen Z feels that work shouldn’t get in the way of personal activities and don’t want to use their PTO for anything other than vacation, such as appointments.

To make it as easy as possible for your employees to find the work-life balance they want, consider adopting a remote or flexible work arrangement. This allows your workers to choose what hours they work and where they work them from. While this idea seems scary at first, remember that modified variations of this policy are possible. Also, modern technology allows your employees to get just as much work done from home as the office. As long as they have internet access, your workers can even communicate with customers by utilizing Voice over Internet Protocol phone systems. VoIP hosts phone signals through cloud servers, which means that your workers can connect with others through any device with internet access.

Provide Social Opportunities

Many young professionals rank having a social work environment as extremely important and specifically seek companies that provide it. These individuals, therefore, value office activities and social events that provide them with an opportunity to mingle with their coworkers. While this might seem like a way to invite distractions into your business, social environments actually encourage collaboration and communication, which can help your company work more efficiently.

Reports have shown that it’s important to Gen Z to bond with their coworkers. To help give them this social environment they so crave, provide an array of different events for coworkers to mingle. These events should include office-wide activities during work hours, mentoring programs, planning speaker series’ for young professionals, and hosting social and volunteer events. This way, employees with families or other obligations after-hours have many different opportunities to attend and be included.

Gen Z may already be in the building so to speak—especially when you’re looking to hire entry-level positions and/or interns—so the time to educate and prepare for them is now. Make the effort to learn what separates this incoming generation from their older counterparts and cater your company to be a place they want to be!

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