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life decision

Transition

Graduated College – Now What?

July 15, 2020

2020 has taken a few unexpected turns that are going to hit the history books. As a recent college grad in the midst of a global pandemic and economic rollercoaster, here are some things you need to take care of now that you are a college graduate.

  1. Health insurance – If you are under the age of 26, try to stay on your parents plan. If you are unable to do so, be sure to find a way to get coverage. Life happens and it can happen fast. You don’t don’t want to get stuck with an out of pocket expense of $30,000 for staying in the hospital for a few nights. 
  2. Have a financial plan – Know what your needs are – living expenses add up quickly. If you have family or friends that are willing to have you for an extended period of time, take it – especially if you have student loans coming up. Saving any penny you can will help you be financially stable.
  3. Finding a job – with unemployment up and COVID-19 making a comeback in some states, it can be difficult to find a position in your specific field. You will need to learn how to hone your skills and be open to learning new industries. Do not box yourself in, and you may stumble upon your dream job!
  4. Create a Budget, AND STICK TO IT – It may sound lame, but having a budget will help you stay focused on your financial goals as well as not creating even more debt you may already be in after graduation.

With the state of the economy out of your control, you can make yourself adaptable. By researching some guidelines and making yourself marketable to multiple industries and positions you will learn to stretch and grow. You will get through this and be stronger for it!

Career Other

Dorm Room to Board Room: Tips for Starting Your Own Business Post-Grad

June 23, 2020

How many stories have we heard about the success of dorm room startups that gained enough investors to grow and become industry giants? SnapChat, ModCloth, Reddit, and Facebook were all once a college student’s idea that eventually became national brands and widely-successful organizations.

Although it takes a great idea, constant networking, and a lot of hard work, the next story could be about your own business idea. Here are some tips on how you can take your business from the dorm room to the board room and find entrepreneurial success post-graduation.

Establish good finances

No matter how good your idea is, you’ll need money to hire employees, pay for production and marketing, and lease an office space. As a college student, you likely don’t have many financial resources to invest in the company yourself. However, you can rely on family and friend contributions, private investors, or SBA loans to gain starting capital that you will eventually payback. If you make regular payments to these lenders, you’ll build good credit and position your business for success. Just be sure you’re managing and organizing these new finances, so you don’t run into trouble. Consider using an online small business bank so you can access your money and track your business expenses no matter where you are, and hire an accountant to ensure you’re doing everything by the book. Proactivity with your business’s money will help you establish a secure enough financial position to grow your business into a powerful brand.

Learn to market

It’s not enough to have a good offering if you can’t interest customers in it. Work to finetune your marketing skills to engage your audience, and bring in business. If you weren’t a business or advertising major, consider taking an online marketing course to learn how to effectively leverage all avenues of your marketing– including social media, ads, and organic search. Then, put it into practice! Build out your organization’s digital footprint and brand recognition by writing content, publishing advertisements, and spreading the word to potential customers. This will not only result in increased sales but also stronger brand recognition and long-term success.

Network, network, network

Networking isn’t just important for securing a job or internship after college, it can also make or break your business. Oftentimes, who you know is one of the most impactful contributions you can bring to your organization as a business owner. Fortunately, you likely have exposure to many powerful people within your university network, whether it’s professors, the board, alumni, or even the students. Reach out to those on and off your campus for a brainstorming meeting, a marketing focus group, or an investing pitch to grow your network and develop interest in your organization.

Find a mentor

Similar to networking, it’s critical that you find a mentor as a post-grad business owner. Even if you have a million-dollar idea, as an inexperienced businessperson, you need access to established knowledge in the entrepreneurial world to guide your decisions. Don’t be afraid to reach out to business owners who inspire you either by email, phone or LinkedIn. Ask for advice on the market or niche you’re interested in, or how they decided to structure their business. This can open a dialogue that’s mutually beneficial, providing them with fresh perspectives, and you with hard-earned industry wisdom. 

It’s critical that you take these proactive steps to ensure the success of your organization. However, when starting your own business after graduation, it’s also important to enjoy the moment. It’s easy to get caught up in the chaos and excitement, but remember to take time to reflect on your progress and stay excited about the future of your business as you move beyond college.

Career Other

Considering Freelance: What Recent Grads Should Know

June 17, 2020

How healthy is freelancing in the US?

Freelancing is an area of the economy that is growing steadily year over year. According to the Freelancing in America Study for 2019 that was conducted by Edelman Intelligence for Upwork, there are more than 57 million Americans freelancing. This is over a third of the US workforce, up from 53 million just 6 years ago. The value of freelance work is almost a trillion US dollars, some 5% of GDP.

Of those that said they have undertaken freelance work, 28% consider themselves as full time freelancers up from 17% back in 2014. The most likely group to freelance are those in the younger age brackets, with 53% of 18-22 year olds doing freelance work and 40% of millennials.

So if you are about to graduate, should you be looking for a traditional and comfortable “job” or should you be looking to enter the freelancing market?

What should you be asking yourself before you freelance?

Recent graduates should not simply leap into freelancing, after all there are some real benefits to working with a company, such as health care and pensions. So what else should you be asking:

  • What are your long term career goals? If your long term goal is to one day be the CEO of a company, freelancing may not offer you the career progression you may need.
  • What are you looking to earn? Freelancers on average earn more per hour than non-freelancers, even for non-skilled workers. However, finding very high paying freelance gigs may be a little harder.
  • What is motivating you to work as a freelancer? Many freelancers take this style of work for the flexibility that it offers. So you need to consider your reasons with care.

What can freelancers earn?

Whether you are working in mobile website development or walking dogs, the salaries that you can earn through freelancing are often higher. The median salary for unskilled workers that freelance is $20 per hour, higher than the US median salary of $18.80. While for skilled freelancers the median is $28 an hour which is better than 70% of the workforce.

So what can you earn as a freelance mobile website designer or within another role? The following are few figures for expected web development salary and what you can aspire to earn within other areas of the freelance economy from The Balance:

  • Web development: $45 per hour
  • IT and programing: $49 per hour
  • Mobile developer: $50 per hour
  • ERP and CRM software developer: $60 per hour
  • Marketing and sales: $44 per hour
  • Design and product development: $45 per hour

What do you really need to know about freelancing before you start?

Before you jump straight out to earn your freelance developer salary there are a few areas that you need to consider before you get started:

  • Networking: most freelancers do not get their clients from online marketplaces. After previous clients, most freelancers working today get work through networking with friends and family which accounts for 38%, while others rely on professional contacts, 37%.
  • Building a portfolio: showing what you are capable of is vital no matter what area you are going to work within. Clients will want to know that you are going to be able to deliver what they are looking for.
  • Handling multiple projects: as a freelancer you will often find yourself in a situation where you will need to juggle multiple clients and projects. So learning soft skills such as time management and communication are vital to your future earning potential.

Is Freelancing right for you?

If you are looking for work with a huge amount of flexibility and the ability to pick and choose what projects you will work on, then freelancing could be for you. It offers an excellent salary no matter where your skills lay. However, it is not an area in which you will be able to relax and just expect work to come to you. You need to work hard on filling your pipeline to ensure a constant supply of work.

Other Transition

10 Things Nobody Tells You About Life After College

June 1, 2020

College is all fun and games until you graduate and find out what really happens. Without any doubt, post-graduation life is not as carefree as college. Star-eyed graduates expect their dream jobs to fall in their lap as they set foot into the real world. However, the truth is that the adult-world has more challenges than anyone prepares students for. 

People often advise students on how to survive college and reach the finish line, but how many people tell you the next step after you cross it? 

Here are 10 things no one tells you about life after college:  

  1. Getting Your Dream Job Is Not Easy

Not to scare you, but getting your dream job right out of college is not easy. You are competing against thousands of other applicants who graduated with you and possess the same knowledge and expertise. 

Wanted to work in Fantasy Sports Software Development? There is a high chance that it may not happen for a few years or at all. We recommend you stay adaptive and flexible; get what you can and work for the rest.  

  1. Post-Graduation Depression Is Real

Between all your bills, college loans, and societal pressure, it is very easy to succumb to depression. But you got to trust yourself and hang on. There is so much left out there in the world for you to explore and experience. Don’t give up without righting for what you really want!

  1. It’s Time To Update Your Closet

What do you mean I can’t be in my sweatpants all the time? Time to buy a perfect blazer, and maybe a couple of new button-down shirts as well. You got to look the part to get the part. 

  1. People Will Ask You About Your Job… Pretty Much All The Time

It’s not really the worst thing on the planet, but it will undoubtedly feel like it when you are constantly asked about your job. Your friends and family will ask this question every time you meet, and new people won’t spare you either. 

  1. Hanging Out With Friends Requires Planning And Effort

Seeing your friends frequently is one of the best parts of college, hands down. But once college is over, people scatter to different parts of the globe and hardly see each other. Once all your college friends find jobs and get busy with work, you will need a lot of planning to hang out. 

  1. A Workday Is Longer Than A School Day

Even a jam-packed day at school will seem shorter than a workday. Even a typical day at work can drain you, so be prepared to be exhausted by the end. 

  1. Summer Vacation? What’s That?

Remember your college spring break or summer vacation? Unless you become a teacher, those are almost non-existent after graduation. Consider going on a big trip right after graduation before you start a new job instead. 

  1. College Does Not Teach Anything About Personal Finance

If you are a finance graduate, this may not apply to you, but for others, it’s a different story. The debit/card cycles are never-ending, and you will feel trapped. Be careful about how you spend money!

  1. Brace Yourself For More Parental Expectations

Finishing college means you are an adult, which naturally comes with a lot of family expectations. Prepare yourself for questions regarding work, living space, marriage, etc. 

  1. The Real World Does Not Care About Your GPA

It’s true! No one cares about your GPA in the real world, and it hardly matters when landing the right job. On the other hand, your skills and networking capabilities will take you a long way.

It is ok to be unsure about what to expect after graduation, but we hope these 10 tips gave you some idea. Welcome to the other side!

Bio: Nouman Ali provides ghostwriting and copywriting services. His educational background in the technical field and business studies helps him in tackling topics ranging from career and business productivity to web development and digital marketing. He occasionally writes articles for Dynamologic Solutions.

Career Other

8 Opportunities to Take Advantage of at Your First Job Out of College

May 28, 2020

So, you’ve finished college. Welcome to the real world! Your first job out of college is more than just a paycheck. It’s an opportunity for growth and stepping stones towards the future you’ve always dreamed of. Here are a few ways to make sure you’re getting the most out of your new job.

Be Smart with Your Paid-Time Off

Make sure you know the difference between your company’s sick leave, vacation, and paid-time-off policies so that you can get the most of your time away from the office. Even if you don’t get sick often, you can still take advantage of your sick days if you ever find yourself in a funk and just need a break. And while some companies let you roll your PTO over into the next year, others might not, so make sure you read the fine print before booking your next getaway.

Get Life Insurance

Take advantage of any life insurance your company offers. Funeral costs can really add up, so it’s best to be prepared. Plus, if you invest in life insurance early on, your investment can be used for other things. Some life insurance policies have cash value, which means you can use the money like a savings account in case you find yourself in need of an extra push on a rainy day.

Don’t Do it For the Money

Let’s face it: you’re probably not going to be raking in your dream salary when it comes to your first job after college. Instead of focusing on how much (or little) you’re making, look at your first post-college job as an opportunity to grow through new experiences. Find things to motivate you throughout the day that aren’t based on money. You’ll be more likely to open yourself up to opportunities that you may have otherwise turned down, which can help you open valuable professional doors down the line.

Health and Wellness

Health benefits can go beyond health insurance. Many companies offer perks such as gym memberships, counseling services, or discounts on services like massages. Doing what you can to balance both your physical and mental wellbeing is a simple way to get the most out of your job, while also taking care of yourself.

Network

Whether you’re just shy or like to play lone-wolf, it’s time to realize how vital building relationships can be. Every single person you meet will know something you don’t, and networking is the ultimate way to tap into that potential. Take the time to get to know people, and show genuine curiosity. Then take it one step further by branching out of who you would normally interact with to expand your network. Just remember that this is a two-way street, so remember to be authentic and don’t expect any favors.

Switch Up Your Commute

Save money and the planet by taking advantage of alternate commuter options. Some companies offer public transportation packages. Instead of driving, you can use the extra time to unwind or focus on the sights along the way or gather your thoughts before work. If that isn’t an option for you, consider looking into carpooling or ride-sharing. Carpooling can save you money and time. It’s also a great way to curb vehicle maintenance costs by prolonging the life of your car.

Employee Assistance Programs

Many companies offer programs that are designed to help employees in a crisis. These programs could range anywhere from substance abuse help, legal counsel referrals, or financial counseling. There are even some with help for things like daycare, veterinary services, and other personal or work-related problems.

Be Upfront

At the end of the day, one of the best things you can do is be upfront in the hiring process. Stay in touch with your human resources department, and let them know that you’re interested in benefits. They’ll appreciate the honesty, and be more than happy to do what they can to help you stay healthy.

Other Transition

What You Need to Know About Applying for College

February 28, 2020

After 12 years of general education, the time has come to join the big leagues. No matter what degree you’re aiming for, going to college can be exciting and frightening at the same. It all starts with you trying to find a reputable college.

If this is your first time applying to college, you might be feeling a little nervous and confused. However, it doesn’t have to be this way. Your college experience should always be an exciting experience.

Here’s what you need to know about applying for college.

Research Early On

You don’t have to wait until you graduate high school to look for a college. In fact, it’s recommended that you search during your time in high school. You should spend a majority of your junior year in high school looking for colleges.

Your senior year should primarily focus on learning the admission process. The admission process can vary, so it’s important to research each college and its requirements. This is where college admissions counseling comes in. They’ll help you set up everything and guide you through the process.

Determine Whether You Should Take the SAT or ACT

Once you’ve figured out what college you want to attend, the next thing you need to consider is what test to take. You can either take the SAT or the ACT. Both of these tests are used as an entryway into most colleges and go over the same subjects. The only real difference is how they’re scored. SATs are scored using a scale between 600 to 2400 while the ACTs measure scores by using 1 to 36.

In general, it doesn’t really matter which test is taken as most colleges take both of them. It’s just that some students do better with the SATs than the ACTs and vice versa. It is possible to take both of them. In fact, taking both of these tests can increase the likelihood of you getting accepted.

Be Ready to Face Rejection

If you get rejected by your college, don’t get discouraged. You can always apply again. But don’t sit around waiting for one college to accept you. Just because one college gave you a rejection doesn’t mean all of them will.

Sure, it may be a little heartbreaking to know that after all of the hard work you’ve done, all you received was a rejection letter. However, even the best of the best get rejections too. They could have the perfect grades and credentials, but the college rejected them anyway.

Applying to college is an exciting process, but it can also be very difficult. So, it’s important that you start off on the right foot. These tips aim to help you achieve just that.

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Career Other

Tips for Students Looking for Jobs

February 21, 2020

Looking for a job as a student can be a challenge since you’ll need to balance your job-hunting time with your focus on your schoolwork. Plus, if you’re about to graduate, you might not have the real-world work experience that many positions require. By adjusting your job hunting and application approach, you can increase your chances of quickly getting a job that you’ll enjoy. 

Be Flexible in Your Requirements

You might have an idea of your dream job in your head, but if you’re graduating or just need to bring in money, you might need to put that dream job on hold for a bit. If you don’t yet have any professional work experience, it can be hard to get a position when you’re competing against applicants with relevant experience and training. 

Instead, be flexible about the positions that you’re looking for, and look for jobs that don’t require you to have experience. These types of positions may include working in a coffee shop, in a retail store, for a landscaping company, or at a movie theater. Remember, you won’t have to stay in these positions forever, and they can serve as stepping stones, giving you the experience and skills that will help you to later get those more competitive jobs that require experience.

Use All of Your Resources

When finding a job as an early college graduate, it’s important to make the most of the job search resources available to you. In addition to using the job search boards, like Indeed, that everyone has access to, you have access to a very valuable resource: Your college’s career services department. This department may be able to help you find job opportunities that aren’t widely advertised to the general public, cutting out some of the competition. 

Most career services also offer many other valuable services. You may be able to have your resume and cover letter reviewed and edited, and the department might hold workshops to teach you valuable career skills, like how to prepare for your first professional job interview. Many career services offices also allow alumni to come back for future support, so even if you’ve already graduated, look into how this important resource might help you.  

Make Yourself Stand Out

When you apply for a job, you’ll probably be competing against many applicants, so you’ll need to find ways to make yourself stand out. For instance, there are many ways to get noticed on LinkedIn, such as by writing a summary that’s focused on what employers want to hear, and by incorporating keywords into your profile so that search engines (and recruiters) can find you. 

Don’t forget to incorporate these strategies into your cover letter and resume, too, since many employers now use technology to scan applications and identify those that include keywords indicating appropriate experience for the position. This strategy might make the difference in having a hiring manager look at your application, versus it ending up in the trash. 

Consider Starting a Business

If you’re graduating and looking for a way to financially support yourself, a job doesn’t have to be your only option. If you’re talented, ambitious, and driven to succeed, then you may be able to start your own business and work for yourself. 

Before you start a business, carefully think about what you enjoy doing and how you’re talented, then look for ways to monetize those talents. Be prepared to work hard and invest in your business, but remember that if you can build it into something successful, you won’t have to worry about applying for jobs. 

Even if your business fails, you’ll have learned valuable lessons and gained experience that can help you if you do decide to apply for jobs in the future.

There are so many opportunities when it comes to job searching. As long as you keep these tips in mind, you will be employed in no time! Happy Hunting!

BIO: Dan Matthews is a writer with a degree in English from Boise State University. He has extensive experience writing online at the intersection of business, finance, marketing, and culture.

Other Transition

Recent Grads’ Guide to Homeownership

November 6, 2019

There are so many things to look forward to upon graduating from college, like new careers, new cities, new friends, and much more! Life after college looks different for everyone, but for some, the first big step might be a transition from dorm-dweller to homeowner. In which case, we’re here to help you plan your next move (literally).

Decide Where to House Hunt

Determining the type of house you want to buy as well as its location can be almost as challenging as it was choosing your major in college. Start by researching important aspects of different areas like safety ratings and median home values. Then, narrow down choices based on other criteria important to you. Is the commute distance to your first post-grad job reasonable? Is there enough nightlife to help you make new friends after college?

Think Long-Term

Don’t feel the pressure that your first home needs to be your dream house or forever home. Instead, a starter home is a perfect option for first-time buyers—especially someone fresh out of college—as they are generally smaller in size and more budget-friendly. Ideally, you should live in a starter home for at least five years and plan to complete a few home improvement projects along the way. 

Even if it’s not on your radar at the moment, home remodeling updates can help you get the most resale value for your home once you outgrow it. In general, kitchen updates are one of the most value-adding renovations—and are do-able even with a low-income entry-level job. To help you budget accordingly, take a look at the average project costs for minor kitchen remodels. Remember, you should only spend 5–15% of your property’s total value if you plan on selling in the near future.

Consider Financial Factors

With all of the transitions of life after college and the excitement of potentially owning a home, it’s not uncommon to overlook various expenses. Therefore it’s vital to plan early and thoroughly. Be sure to research the additional costs of purchasing a home, which may include:

  • Down payments
  • Property taxes
  • Homeowners’ insurance

More importantly, consider how your personal finances will change after college and what you need to account for in your budget. Examples include:

  • Student loan repayments
    • Is your six-month grace period for your federal student loans coming to an end?
    • Are you on an income-based repayment (IBR) plan? If so, it might be more challenging to get approval for a mortgage.
  • Health insurance
    • Is your student health plan ending?
    • Are you in the middle of a health coverage gap until your post-grad job benefits kick in?

Assess Your Credit

Once you establish your budget, it’s time to begin the mortgage process. When you apply for a mortgage loan, most lenders start by looking at your FICO scores—a summary of your credit report. The type of loan you qualify for will depend on your credit score, but the higher your credit score, the higher your chances are of getting approved. Most grads don’t build a credit history until after college; But to remain in good standing, below are tips to improve your credit before applying for a mortgage:

  • Pay off any existing credit card balances
  • Avoid making purchases with credit cards (i.e., using available credit)
  • Don’t apply for credit elsewhere that will generate a hard inquiry (ex: credit cards, car loans)
  • Consistently make all payments on time, especially student loans

Buying a home is an exciting and expensive investment that will undoubtedly impact your future, so take these considerations into account when searching for your first home and don’t rush the process. 

Career Other

From New Grad to Entrepreneur: Starting a Business Right After College

October 30, 2019

Thousands of ambitious graduates each year walk out of the halls of college life to take on the real world. These graduates will make up the next generation of scientists, inventors, founders, entrepreneurs, and business owners. Each armed with their career plan and determination, they tread the road to career building and make bold moves in professions they want to pursue. 

Naturally, nothing comes easy and almost everything requires a solid plan. College grads that crave the excitement and control of entrepreneurship also need to follow a set of guidelines to run a flourishing business. We’ve gathered some of the best entrepreneurial advice for those looking to start a business fresh out of college. 

 Refine your idea through research

Those who are considering starting a business, likely have a brief idea about the product or service they wish to sell and the market they want to enter. All potential business runners must do some research on existing firms, their products and advertising techniques in their selected industry to figure out how to do it better. Identify and understand your targeted audience; learn what grasps their attention and pay close attention to their demands. 

Your aim is to stand out and offer something that other businesses lack, while also providing a stellar user experience. Scout the idea you’re most passionate about. If it’s something that doesn’t inspire you then it’s time to brainstorm some fresher ideas. 

Learn from the inside

Graduate students need to have some level of employment history or experience, before starting a business. This is because learning some key skills from seasoned professionals in bigger companies can help in networking and connecting with the right people. These are practices that are oftentimes not introduced in school and learning them in real-time can be an incredibly knowledgeable experience. 

Learning from management leaders and business tycoons in your desired industry allows you to gain first-hand experience on the operations that go on within a smooth-running business in a short amount of time. Additionally, working in a variety of establishments helps to build a stronger network and contacts that could later guide you in what you wish to accomplish. 

Use your tech knowledge

College grads can harness technological tools and devices to develop, promote and expand their businesses. Technology allows us to access information and data that wasn’t available a decade ago, so making good use of it to promote and advertise your brand increases audience engagement. It also lets us search solutions and answers to several everyday-related business issues, making our work easier and more streamlined. 

For instance, if your firm is located in London and has important business guests visiting so you need your carpets and upholstery cleaned; look up London carpet cleaners online and you’ll be provided with a list of reviews that can help you decide the best deal for your company. 

Figure out finances

One of the biggest hassles of starting up a business straight out of college is securing sufficient financing. This could be your investments, a bank loan or in some cases through angel investors. Potential entrepreneurs are required to understand all the elements in running a business, including the financial aspects like budgeting. Starting small is always a smart move, and expanding as you gain momentum is the way to go. This way you have more control over what is spent and consumed by the business. 

Cultivate Determination

Success is never guaranteed from the starting point. You are bound to fail a solid number of times before you get the hang of things. What matters is your undying dedication and commitment to your business to see it prosper and succeed. 

Perseverance and devotion are what makes a successful entrepreneur, so don’t fear failure and turmoil. As long as you face every challenge with a clear mind and a positive attitude, you’ll pound your way through them. This is the reality that prospective business owners need to understand before venturing into this competitive realm.

BIO: Anne Taylor is a serial blogger with a technical and business background. She loves writing about digital marketing, the IT industry and workplace productivity. She is currently the content writer for Carpet Cleaning London.

Health Other

Why College Students Can’t Sleep

October 25, 2019

It seems that sleeping and college life just do not go together since sleeping is something that almost every student fails to do at some point. When did sleeping regularly become harder than studying? Are students studying so hard that they do not have enough time to sleep? Sleep problems in college students are not a surprise, but students should not neglect them, because lack of sleep during college can leave consequences that will affect their life even when their college days are over.

What Is Keeping Students up All Night?

When we hear that college students are not sleeping well, we immediately assume that that is the case because they are partying too much. And sometimes that is true, parties are a part of their lifestyle, but we cannot blame it all on partying every time. Many students are facing some other challenges that are not letting them sleep well. Some of them have to work part-time, some take a packed load course, others are dealing with stress or an eventful social life, etc. 

What is common is that a lot of students like to pull an all-nighter, trying to learn as much as possible in the last few hours before the exam. However, this usually turns against them. Because when students are sleep deprived, they are more prone to mistakes. They have issues concentrating or thinking clearly, which is why getting at least 7 hours of sleep before an exam is always important.

College life is challenging and stressful in so many ways, and some students just can’t take the pressure. Due to that, many of them are suffering from mental health disorders, such as depression and anxiety; those conditions often tend to trigger sleep disorders such as insomnia. But the relationship between sleep and mental health disorders goes in both ways, so students should not ignore any symptoms.

Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

It all starts with skipping classes occasionally because you’re unable to wake up on time in the morning. Then comes the poor grades on exams, and eventually, some people even drop out of college because they can’t keep up anymore. Lack of sleep is seriously jeopardizing the performance of college students. But if you get used to it, and it becomes a part of your lifestyle, you will be stuck in that vicious circle for a long time. 

Besides poor academic performance, sleep deprivation leaves more permanent marks on our health. You can develop numerous sleep disorders, and your immune system will weaken, you are at risk of diabetes, heart disease, depression, and anxiety. There is life after college, and students need to think about their future and take care of their health.

Learning How to Sleep

If you can prepare for an exam in less than a week, you can surely learn how to sleep. If you are used to staying up late, falling asleep at a proper time will be hard in the beginning, harder than staying up all night. But, you can do it, everyone can. Once you notice the benefits, such as fresh look on your face, alertness, improved memory, and academic performance, you will never wish to skip sleeping again.

Author’s Bio:

Selena Thomas is a content writer who loves sharing tips on healthy lifestyles. A writer by day and a reader by night, she’s fond of writing articles that can help people in improving both physical and mental health. Also, she loves traveling and inspires people on her blogs.