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Career Transition

The Post-Grad Job Hunt

March 31, 2022

As graduation gets closer, many feelings start to bubble up; excitement, relief, nervousness, and maybe even anxiety. As we prepare to leave this phase of life and enter another, there are a few things that you can do to make the transition more manageable as you begin looking for your first job as a college graduate.

The hunt for a job starts before you ever step foot off-campus.

Before Leaving College

Of course, there is the fact that you need to actually graduate, move off-campus, and get settled in your new place. However, before you head out into the world, there are a few resources your school may have available to help get you started.

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Career Student Life

3 Things Every Student Should Do Before Graduating 

March 29, 2022
Things to do before graduation

The months following graduation can feel a little odd. Maybe you didn’t have a job lined up after college like some of your friends did. It’s difficult to keep in touch when you’re not bumping into each other on campus or in the residence halls anymore. As a result, many recent grads struggle to adapt to life outside of college.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. You can make your transition from college into post-grad life a little easier by planning ahead and preparing for all that life has to offer. Here are 3 things every student should do before graduating and heading into the workforce.

Polish Your Social Media Accounts

Your social media accounts will serve a very different purpose once you graduate. Social media was a great way to connect with new friends and learn about events or parties in college. But when you graduate, your social media account can be a risk to your personal and professional growth.  

Nowadays, most organizations will look you up on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram before hiring you. Anything that was considered cool in college, such as underage drinking, or posting photos by the pool every Saturday may come back to haunt you if your future employer saw it. Just because your profile settings are set to private, doesn’t mean it’s completely blocked off.

This doesn’t mean you have to delete every social picture from your profiles. You just have to be savvy about what you leave up and what you take down. Try to untag yourself from anything that might be misinterpreted. What happens online, stays online!

Update Your Resume

When was the last time you updated your resume? For most college students, it was probably either in high school or when you applied for a recent part-time position. These versions of your resume simply won’t cut it in the professional world, where you need to put forward a solid resume to make it to the interview stage. 

Fortunately, most colleges have a career services department to help you create the best version of your resume. Usually, the folks who work in these offices have plenty of experience, so it’s worth checking them out and listening to their suggestions. 

You can start writing a killer resume by researching successful resumes online. This will give you an idea of the industry standard and help you choose between design templates and layouts. Regardless of the template you choose, you must first share the most essential information. This depends on the job you are applying to and your experience, but it should always display your strongest achievements and accomplishments first.  Make sure to mention your anticipated graduation month and year, and if you’re open to relocating after graduating.

Write a Will and Advanced Directive

Many people mistakenly believe that will writing is only for the elderly or those with life-threatening conditions. The reality is that all adults need to have a will to make things easier for loved ones if tragedy does occur. 

However, if it’s your first time writing a will, it can be hard to know what to include. Typically, your will should tell your loved ones what you want to happen regarding your health care, property, and assets. Your parents will likely be able to help you out with writing your first will. You can always update it down the line after big life events, such as getting married or having a child.

Takeaways

Transitioning from college to the workforce is always going to be tricky. But you can make the process a little smoother by planning ahead and setting a clear direction for your life after graduation. Start by assessing your social media presence and resume materials, as these will play a significant role in your job hunt. Then, consider writing a will and advanced directive, so you can move into life beyond college with peace of mind. 

Career Student Life

Starting College Undeclared and Thriving

March 15, 2022

You have high hopes and big dreams when you head off to college, but things don’t always go according to plan. Sometimes when you start college, you may start to change and find that what you thought you wanted is no longer the case. Maybe you don’t even know what you want to do in the first place. Either way, it is alright if you don’t have a major picked out right away, or start college undeclared.

With many majors and specializations offered, choosing which major to pursue your bachelor’s degree can be challenging. It is okay to feel uncertain at first, and many students are open to the chance to explore different fields to discover what interests them most. There are often many negative feelings surrounding being undeclared at the beginning of your college career; however, it can actually be a good thing to not have a major picked right away.

Benefits of Being Undeclared

Enrolling with an undeclared major allows you to explore your options and give you the chance to take a variety of courses on different topics to see what you would like to pursue further. You will need to check your universities requirements or with your academic advisor to see how long you can be undeclared. Most universities will allow you to remain undeclared for up to one year or two semesters.

Starting your college career undeclared can also save you some hassle later on down the road. According to Frank.org, at least 80% of college students change their major during their college career. If you start out undecided and take the time to look through the different options by taking courses and speaking with an academic advisor, you can make a well-informed choice. The later in school you change your major, the more significant the implications could be.

Although taking this route may be helpful to you, it’s important to note that not picking a major may push your expected graduation date back. That could affect any scholarships or other financial aid you might have, so it would be good to talk it over with someone before making any significant changes.

Picking a Major

For an incoming freshman, our best piece of advice is not to stress about picking a major right away. Now that you have taken some time to look over the different options offered at your university, you can begin narrowing your options.

Make a list

We make lists for all sorts of reasons; why would picking a major be any different? Writing things down can help you visually and logically think through them.

When deciding your major, there are many factors that you should think about:

  • What courses are involved?
  • What are the graduation requirements?
  • What job could I get after I graduate?

Now that you have your list of options you’ve explored, which ones would you like to seriously consider?

What Did You Like?

On this list of possible majors, which ones do you like? Do any of them have the chance to help you get a job that you would enjoy? Let yourself be a little more creative to explore all the things you’re passionate about to see if you can visualize yourself in a particular role or field using the major. While some of the classes you take might not lead up to being aligned with your major, they can help you navigate your way to something involving different things you are passionate about.

What Were You Good At?

To narrow down the list, even more, think about all the classes from your major list that you were good at. And if you’re up for it, include the ones you think you weren’t so fond of.

How will this be helpful? When you compare the two, it can help you make an informed, logical choice. It may seem weird, but just because you are good at something doesn’t mean that you would end up enjoying that major or a job in that related field.

For example, if you are good at math and performed well in your first accounting class but did not enjoy the coursework involved, you might not want to consider accounting as a major moving forward.

Talk to a Professional

Although we have mentioned it before, a great way to get a sense of what major you might want to pursue further is speaking with an advisor. They will better understand what the coursework will look like moving forward and can help with any questions or hesitations you have.

You can also try speaking with someone who got a degree in a field you’re considering. It could be a parent, family member, friend, or acquaintance, but getting advice from someone with experience in the field can give you valuable insight into if you would enjoy this major or career path.

You could ask about what it’s like getting into the industry, the work-to-life balance, pay range, and possible career growth. Knowing this information can give you a sense of whether or not careers within this degree path are suitable for you.

Picking a major and a career path can be scary, but know that you are not alone! There are many different options out there to help you make this decision. Although it may feel overwhelming, it is okay to start school not exactly sure where you are headed or change your direction halfway through.

Career Student Life

Diversity Encouragement Strengthening STEM Disciplines

March 1, 2022

A STEM career may prove to be a great choice for you. For instance, you can earn a degree in astronomy, biology, or another STEM field. From here, you can gain the skills you need to become a key contributor in a STEM role. In addition, you can help foster diversity among STEM disciplines. 

You can simultaneously build a rewarding STEM career and promote diversity in STEM disciplines. And doing so may have far-flung effects on yourself and many others long into the future. 

Why STEM Studies Are Crucial 

Sparking interest in STEM studies drives diversity among STEM disciplines. To understand why, consider what can happen if you pursue a STEM degree. 

In this instance, you’ll use hands-on and classroom training and exercises to build your skill set in science, technology, engineering, and math. Next, you can use your STEM skills to solve problems and take your creativity to new heights. 

At this point, your STEM skills can make you an attractive candidate for top jobs from STEM companies. They can even help you earn a great salary. 

Let’s not forget about the unique contributions you’ll be able to bring to a STEM company, either. Your contributions may lead others to pursue STEM careers. As a result, you’ll foster diversity in STEM disciplines. 

How Educators Encourage Diversity in STEM Disciplines 

If you’re on the fence about a college major, meeting with educators can provide a great starting point. Teachers have your best interests at heart and can address any doubts you have about choosing a college major.  

Many teachers possess cultural awareness that is vital to the enjoyment and pursuit of learning. These teachers can help you explore career interests you previously might not have considered. And they may help you find a STEM degree program that suits you perfectly. 

Ultimately, earning a degree in a STEM discipline can provide a viable career path. There are many degrees you can pursue in STEM studies. Thus, you can find one that interests you and make a career out of it. You can help make STEM disciplines more diverse than ever before, too. 

How to Build a STEM Career and Promote Diversity

Once you’re ready to earn a degree in a STEM field, you’ll need to find the right degree program. You can look for STEM studies at colleges and universities close to home. Or, you can enroll in an online degree program.

Search for degree programs that align with what you want to accomplish in your career. Oftentimes, it helps to list out your career goals. You can then use your goals to figure out what degree programs can help you build your ideal STEM career. 

Take advantage of any opportunities to gain experience, too. Sign up for workshops on various STEM topics. You can also explore internship and apprenticeship opportunities. 

Remain on the lookout for opportunities to grow your STEM career as well. If you are open to learning about new STEM topics, you can continuously enhance your skillset. Over time, you may establish a cultural awareness that helps you get the most out of learning about STEM topics as well.  

Launch Your STEM Career

Pursue STEM studies in areas that interest you. In doing so, you can build a rewarding STEM career and foster diversity in STEM disciplines. 

Adulting Career Transition

Best Jobs for Introverts

February 8, 2022
Introvert Jobs in College

It can be difficult enough to find a job. Finding one that you, as an introvert, can thrive in is even more difficult. It can seem like the world is built for extroverts, and large portions of it can be. However, in these modern times (especially during the pandemic) finding a job where you can limit your social interactions—or even work from home—is a lot easier.

Money isn’t the only thing you should be considering when looking for a new job. It is important, but you may find out that even if a job pays well, it isn’t the best for you. Here are 4 jobs that an introvert like yourself may enjoy.

1. Architect

Architects mostly work independently, planning and designing a variety of different buildings. If you like to solve problems and have a creative mind, being an architect may be the right pick for you. 

2. Librarian

This one may seem self-explanatory. A library is a quiet setting, one that many introverts can be drawn to. Being a librarian involves helping people find and check out books, as well as being responsible for the library’s upkeep and possible events. This job has more social interaction than you may think, so make sure you know what you’re getting into before accepting any position.

3. Social Media Manager

If you are knowledgeable and passionate about social media but don’t want to post about yourself, being a social media manager could be perfect for you! Social media managers create posts for clients, as well as plan and market larger campaigns. This is a job that can allow a lot of freedom and opportunities to work from home.

4. Editor

Like language? Have a passion for reading and writing? Consider becoming an editor. Editors mostly work alone and a good number work from home. They spend most of their time reading and looking over content to make sure it’s ready to be published. An editor could edit content for a variety of different mediums and subjects.

Conclusion

These were just 4 jobs that introverts may be attracted to. Remember, money isn’t everything when it comes to a job or career. It certainly is important, however. If you’re looking for a job that will pay you enough, Mint’s salary tool can help you see the salary range for a number of different jobs and locations.

BIO: Ray Alonzo is an avid writer from Phoenix. He focuses heavily on research to provide the most accurate information possible to readers.

Student Life

Here’s Why Every Student-Athlete Should Get a Part-Time Job

December 3, 2021

There are many benefits to being a student-athlete. You get to proudly represent your university while having access to your school’s exclusive training facilities and equipment. You form a bond with your fellow players and learn teamwork and sportsmanship. You also develop healthy habits, staying mentally and physically fit to excel in your performance. Many student-athletes also receive financial assistance to help fund their tuition, campus housing, and other school expenses.

However, it’s not all perks and glory. Being a student-athlete entails hard work, discipline, and commitment. You must meet all that is required of a student and an athlete, learning to effectively manage your time between classes and practices, as well as exams and athletic competitions.

Aside from practicing and training while maintaining your GPA, add finding a part-time job to your busy schedule. Even though you can now monetize your name, image, and likeness as a college athlete, getting a part-time job won’t just earn you some extra cash, it will also teach you real-life lessons as you transition to adulthood.

Here are some valuable things you can learn from getting a part-time job while balancing sports and studies.

The Importance of People Skills

As a student-athlete, you get to train with people who share the same interests and values. You know how to trust and communicate with each other on the court or on the field to achieve a common goal. 

However, when you land a part-time job, you will often find yourself working with individuals with different personalities and beliefs, with different goals and commitments. You might not even like some of these people and some of them might not like you. It could be a co-worker in a restaurant who feels your lack of experience is backing up service. Or a supervisor with instructions and criticisms you don’t always agree with.

But to do your job, you must learn to work with this team. You’ll have to learn how to effectively communicate with them. You need to actively listen, understand, and empathize to minimize miscommunication and conflicts, and instead build trust, rapport, and respect. You must also learn how to receive feedback constructively, without being reactive and defensive.

The ability to positively interact with others, despite having diverse interests and backgrounds, allows you to form effective working relationships and helps you succeed at work and in life.

The Power of a Positive Attitude

After a long week of class lectures, project deadlines, and rigorous training drills, the last thing you may want to do is report to your Saturday shift at a local coffee shop—especially after a customer got upset with you the last time for misspelling her name and for topping her frappe with whipped cream after she specifically told you not to.

Instead of dwelling on the mishaps, overcome these challenges by looking at things with optimism. Learn from your mistakes and aim to better yourself. If you focus too much on the negatives, you might prevent yourself from improving. So, instead of dreading another blunder, smile at your next customer and spell out his name before you scribble it on his cup. Then repeat his order to make sure you got it right.

When you make a habit of seeing the bright side of things, you can take on even the most challenging situations with a positive mindset and view mistakes and setbacks as opportunities to learn and become better.

The Goal of Financial Freedom

The average professional athlete earns over $50,000 a year, with the top earners making almost $90,000 annually. If you wake up tomorrow and get drafted as one of the youngest players in history—congratulations! For most student-athletes though, it may take several years longer before you get your big break.

Instead of sitting on the bench, working and earning your own money teaches you to appreciate the value of every dollar. You won’t have to rely on your parents for cash as you take the first step toward financial independence. You will learn how to properly manage your finances and build good credit as a student.

Earning money from a part-time job helps ensure you pay your monthly balance on time. Establishing good credit while you’re young teaches you to become more reliable and responsible and positively impacts your ability to get a job, utility services, better insurance rates, better housing options, and more.

Success in a Different Career

While there are nearly half a million NCAA student-athletes, a much lower number make it to pro after college. Like any big game, finding a job inside or outside of sports requires hard work, discipline, and a solid game plan. Taking on a part-time job while studying can improve your employment prospects and help you succeed in your future career, whether it’s on the sports field or in the corporate arena.

Working part-time as a student-athlete does not only teach you to manage your time, but you also get to find and develop your other strengths. You can try different career options. You can find a job in health and fitness as a coach or trainer. You can try the food and restaurant industry as a member of the wait staff. You can also consider online gigs and do freelance work as a social media manager, virtual assistant, online tutor, or graphic designer.

Final Word

Devoting even just a few hours a week over four years of college gives you hundreds of hours of shadowing or internship experience. This equips you with valuable knowledge and skills that can help you stand out in any career you choose.

Career Transition

Dealing With Age Diversity in the Workplace at Your First Post-Grad Job

November 15, 2021

Congratulations! You’ve graduated college and you’re ready to settle down into your first post-graduation job.

You’re probably a bit nervous, which is understandable. You know there’s a lot to learn, and you’re going to encounter people with more experience than you. What might surprise you on your first day, though, is the variety of ages.

Many new graduates don’t think about age diversity at work. Up until now, anyone you worked with or went to school with was similar in age. Anyone older tended to be a boss or professor.

Not anymore. Now you’re going to have peers that are decades older than you — and you might even manage someone who is your senior. How can you navigate this in your first job? Here are some tips.

Build a Strong Relationship With HR

Many professionals think of HR as “where they go when they’re in trouble,” like the principal’s office, but that’s far from the case. The human resources department can help you with various important issues when you start your first job.

For example, HR is where you set up your benefits and ask questions about health insurance, retirement accounts, and other employee perks. A good HR manager can also help you navigate the different generations of employees that surround you.

There’s no reason to be intimidated by older employees or to disregard their ideas as outdated. Instead, respect them as peers and learn from them while communicating your expertise as well.

Know the Different Generations

Because you’ve been surrounded by your own generation your entire life until now, it can be a bit challenging to understand how other generations see the world. Of course, memes and jokes on social media don’t help, either!

Baby boomers were born between 1945 and 1964. They have a strong work ethic but didn’t grow up with access to a lot of technology. They tend to stay in one job for a long time, and they prefer face-to-face communication.

Generation X was born between 1965 and 1980. This generation is financially responsible and hard-working. They are often comfortable working with technology but also do well in person. Generation X workers look for flexibility in their work environment.

Millennials were born between 1981 and 1996. They joined the workforce during difficult economic times, so they have a looser view of long-term careers. They’re comfortable with digital communication and are quick to join social networks. Millennials look for a deeper purpose in their work, along with opportunities for advancement.

Finally, there’s Generation Z. That’s you! Born between 1997 and 2012, these folks are just entering the workforce. Gen Z are digital natives and concerned with financial debt. At work, they look for flexible working arrangements, social opportunities, and career development.

As you meet your coworkers, pay attention to what generation they’re in and how that might shape their outlook on work as well as their goals. For example, baby boomers and Millennials are very different in their approaches!

Take Advantage of the Diversity Around You

Working side-by-side with different generations may be a bit scary at first, but the truth is that it’s a huge benefit for your career. There’s a lot of wisdom in people who are older — and younger — than you are.

Make sure you learn to communicate professionally with everyone and consider their perspective, life experiences, and goals. When you do, you’ll find that other generations are happy to accept you and learn from you as well!

BIO: Dan Matthews is a writer with a degree in English from Boise State University. He has extensive experience writing online at the intersection of business, finance, marketing, and culture.

Student Life

Student Guide on How to Stop Overspending and Start Saving

November 11, 2021

Being a student is one of the most exciting phases of one’s life. Financially, this is the ideal time to experiment with your ideas and get a head start for adulthood. The challenge, though, is how to make ends meet with the limited resources you currently have. After all, just a night of overspending can lead to disastrous results down the line.

Fortunately, there are a lot of steps that you can practice to prevent overspending and learn more about personal financial management. In this article, we are going to share some of them with you, particularly those that we have already tried and tested for years:

1.  Make use of last year’s books.

According to Academic Matters, an average student spends more than $1,000 on books and other learning materials per year. While putting them to good use is the best way to make the most of your investment, there is another way to get (at least) some of your money back. Take good care of your textbooks because you can still resell them for a good price once the school year’s over. Check out your campus bookstore for buy-back programs, or sites such as Amazon or Chegg.

2.  Enjoy savings for this year’s books.

While we’re on the topic of textbook savings, you can use similar tactics for books you have yet to purchase. Look into buying used textbooks or renting them. Many times, you can still. write and highlight in books you rent, so it shouldn’t impact your study habits.

3.  Know your discounts.

Since we are already talking about Amazon, did you know that they have an Amazon Prime student program as well? This allows you to sign-up at half the price of their regular plan, take advantage of significant discounts, enjoy free food delivery, and more.

Meanwhile, Amazon is not the only company that offers discounts to students. Don’t forget other types of bonuses as well. For instance, groceries typically hold late-night discounts for perishable items that didn’t sell during the day. Take the time to find what’s available near you and you might be surprised how a little effort can stretch your dollars further.

4.  Plan your expenses and shop smart.

There are different types of budgeting systems but for students, we highly recommend starting with something simple like the envelope system. It won’t require any expense recording but it will make sure that you live within your means.

Don’t automatically assume that you need to buy everything as well. You will need a lot of things when you’re moving into you’re venturing out into the world for the first time, but don’t think that you would need to buy everything brand new.

There’s no shame in asking around whether your family and friends have some things that you might need just lying around unused, such as old pieces of furniture or kitchen appliances. Other items, like the power tools you’ll need to assemble your own furniture, can also be rented as needed.

We also recommend alternative methods such as point-of-need financing. You can use it to buy bigger educational-related expenses, like a new laptop or a printer. You might even need a small fridge or a microwave for your dorm room. This will allow you to get what you need and pay for them through smaller and more manageable monthly payments.

5.  Explore new interests.

Binge drinking, excessive partying, shopping, and even vaping are all hobbies that are not just irresponsible, they’re quite costly too. Instead, consider exploring fun and inexpensive hobbies!

For example, there are affordable musical instruments that you can start learning how to play. Getting a chess set is pretty cheap and you can spend your whole life contemplating on its 69,352,859,712,417 possibilities and still not master it.

Are you a fan of working out? There are campus gyms that offer free memberships for their students, teachers, even the alumni. The fun that comes with college parties can still be enjoyed, just not overdone!

6.  Take advantage of more affordable forms of entertainment.

A lot of campuses offer free (or really affordable) forms of entertainment such as movie nights, museum passes, and cultural shows. We also recommend skipping a costly cable package. Try a streaming service instead, like Netflix or Hulu. Amazon also offers Amazon Music and Prime Video as part of the student program we have featured earlier. Talk to your roommates and see if they’d split the cost on one or two streaming services for you to share.

In fact, when it comes to music, there really is no need to buy tracks these days. You can simply use free streaming services like Spotify or Pandora.

7.  Share food and space with your friends.

You can further pull down your monthly expenses by splitting the cost of your rent and utilities with a roommate. You can even plan your meals together and share grocery expenses. Splitting the responsibility of cooking and cleaning up is unbeatable!

8.  Review your life skills.

Speaking of cooking, it will save you a lot from eating and spending money on take out. We know how convenient it is, but it is financially smarter to just cook your own dinner rather than reaching for Uber Eats every other day. Save those splurge nights for really special occasions.

Riding a bike is another way to save money in college. Car payments, insurance, parking passes, and gas can really add up, especially if you are on a student budget. If you really need a car, you could rent one for the day or utilize a ride share service. But a bike should be enough if you live on campus or close by.

There are certainly other methods to save money as a student, but the ones we have mentioned above are good points that you can already start practicing. Good luck!

Career Student Life

5 Part Time Online Careers for College Students

November 1, 2021

School tuition is no joke. Some students need to take part-time jobs just to be able to make it through college. However, certain circumstances make it more difficult to work in person. If you’re a college student who wants to earn extra income from the comfort of your home or dorm, here are some part-time positions you can try.

Photo and video editing services

A lot of people out there are not so well-versed with editing photos and videos and would often find freelancers online who could work on one or two projects for them. If you know a thing or two about photo restoration, video editing for social media, and other editing tasks, you can work as a freelancer online. You don’t even have to invest much. You can sign up on free freelance job websites and use a free online video editor for your work.

Freelance writing

Online writers are in high demand. Businesses, professionals, and even independent creators all need written content to build and establish their online presence. There are websites like UpWork where you can sign up to find and bid for freelance writing projects. Just like photo and video editing, clients just provide a deadline so you work on your own schedule.

Online teaching

If you are quite knowledgeable about a subject, language, art, or musical instrument, then you can offer online lessons for a fee. You can do this independently or you could register at websites that offer tutorial services for students who need after-school assistance with specific subjects.

Stock photography

If you have a camera and can take pretty decent photos, you can consider selling some of your images online. Stock media is highly popular and people are willing to pay for photos they could use on their websites, ads, blogs, videos, magazines, brochures, and other digital or printed materials. Although the income probably won’t be consistent, you could earn enough to support your studies by putting out photos that are relevant to popular topics nowadays.

Graphic design or digital art

Digital creations are in demand, be it for personal or business use. You can work as a project-based graphic designer, creating brand logos, brochures, packaging design, and other visual concepts for companies, entrepreneurs, and organizations. If you are more interested in art, you can create digital artworks and sell prints of them online.

Starting your online career

An online part-time job can help you earn extra income for your college tuition. The great thing about working remotely is that you won’t have to spend money commuting to your workplace. If at all possible, find an online job that’s related to your current field of study. Not only will it help you financially, you will also gain a lot of experience while being able to learn more and hone your skills. Just make sure that you have a working computer, a stable internet connection, and the apps or tools that you need to help you work better and create impressive results. Good luck!

Adulting

7 Time Management Tips for Working Students

October 11, 2021

Studying for a major exam or writing a paper is time-consuming, but it’s even more challenging when you’re dealing with a job at the same time. Effective time management can often be the difference between passing your classes and struggling, but how do you manage your time while you’re working? With the right plan in place, you can enjoy a successful academic year, all while keeping your job.

Read on for a list of 7 time-management tips for working students that will help to ensure success in school and your career.

Make a Schedule

Every successful venture starts with a good schedule in place. Whether daily, weekly, or monthly, the first step to effective time management is creating a schedule that works for you, then stick to it. If you need to, design a schedule that allows you to work in 30-minute increments. For example, jot down your work hours, then break up your non-working hours in smaller bites, noting which classes will need the most attention first and when.

Don’t Procrastinate

It can be easy to put off things you don’t want to do, but procrastinating will always result in you feeling stressed out later. Avoid putting off something you can do right now whenever possible. The sooner you accomplish tasks, the more free time you’ll have to enjoy things later on.

Prioritize

Set your priorities in order of importance and try to “knock out” the most essential items first. Even if you have to start small, doing things right away will make meeting deadlines and writing papers easier when the time comes. Not only will prioritizing tasks make it easier to get them done on time, but it will also ease your stress levels.

Plan Ahead

Create a daily or weekly to-do list so it’s easier to plan the things you need to get done in advance. Keep track of important dates and deadlines, and ensure that you’ll have plenty of time available to complete them in advance. Not only does planning ahead make it easy to accomplish tasks, but you’ll remember which things need to complete and when.

Avoid Multitasking

Many people think that multitasking is the best way to get things done, but it can actually backfire. When you multitask, you’re not dedicating all of your brainpower to one task. Avoid the temptation of multitasking and instead, try to put all of your attention on each item individually to stay focused.

Stay Healthy

Getting proper exercise and eating a healthy diet will help you feel better physically and mentally. Don’t forget to make sure that you’re getting plenty of sleep every night, too. When your body is healthy, your mind will be much more agile and able to retain important information.

Create a Routine

Creating a regular routine is vital to any successful lifestyle. Do your best to go to bed and get up at the same time every night and make studying a part of your daily life. Once you have a set routine, it will be much easier to stick to the daily things you need to do.Keep these seven tips in mind if you’re a working student to help you manage your time as effectively as possible. With these simple tasks, you can begin to make each one of them a daily habit that will set you up for success. Remember to devise a schedule and prioritize the most important things you need to do to work best for you and your lifestyle for a successful working life and academic career.