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healthy living

Health

Health Preparedness Tips for On-Campus Life

September 3, 2020

When you’re in college, living on campus can feel like a right of passage. It’s a great time to gain independence, have fun, and develop friendships you’ll have for a lifetime while enjoying the convenience and benefits of living where you go to school. 

Unfortunately, campus life looks a bit different this year. Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, colleges across the country have suspended in-person classes and have required students to leave campus. 

Some schools have closed their doors temporarily, while others will be shut down for on-campus living for the remainder of the school year. While the goal of the shutdown and the encouragement for social isolation is to flatten the curve of the Coronavirus spread, it can be a difficult transition. You must head home or go somewhere else for now. 

Whether you return to campus before the school year is over or you’ll be back next semester once things calm down, this is a good time to reflect on your health and wellness and what you can do to keep yourself safe, strong, and healthy. 

Managing Your Mental Health

Mental health is one of the biggest concerns facing college students today. Since many students across the country are being forced to stay home, issues like anxiety and depression are becoming more prevalent. 

Making your mental health a priority is a key factor to get you through this pandemic, but it’s also important when you return to campus. While college is an exciting and fun experience, it can also be overwhelming at times. Learning how to manage your stress levels can prevent you from getting sick. 

There are simple, everyday habits you can start to reduce stress: 

  • Get more sleep
  • Limit caffeine and alcohol
  • Talk to someone about your stress
  • Manage your time
  • Meditation/Yoga
  • Keep a journal

You can keep up with those habits as you get back to school and use them for the rest of your life to manage stress..

If your current stressor is being stuck at home, online learning might feel like your biggest hurdle. If you’re trying to adjust to online learning and having a difficult time, there are a few tips to make the experience less stressful: 

  • Create a designated learning space
  • Stick to specific hours of the day to study
  • Avoid distractions
  • Set personal goals

Give yourself permission to stumble. This is a learning experience for everyone and a time of great uncertainty. Don’t put pressure on yourself, and eventually, things will begin to fall into place and feel less stressful. 

Developing Healthy Habits Now

Exercising is a great way to stay healthy when stuck at home. Thankfully, there are no rules or regulations in place about going for a run outside or working out at home. 

Exercise can give you more energy, boost your mood, and reduce stress. Get into a daily routine that you can keep doing once you get back to campus. Adding a workout to your day has many benefits and can keep you focused when you’re back in school. 

It’s also a good idea to watch your diet while away from campus. It’s easy to fall into unhealthy habits when convenience food is so easy to come by, and apps like GrubHub and Postmates will deliver food right to your door. Making healthy nutritional choices will improve your mood and energy levels and lower your risk of illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure. 

Being stuck at home means it’s the perfect time to brush up on your cooking skills! Practice making healthy meals for yourself that could be made in a dorm room or communal kitchen. Making quick, easy meals that are also good for you will keep you motivated when it comes to making healthier food choices on campus. 

Reducing Your Risks

The Coronavirus can impact anyone, but it’s most deadly among those with pre-existing conditions or with lung and respiratory issues like those who regularly smoke or vape. Vaping has become hugely popular across the country, but the chemicals in many vape solutions can cause serious lung problems. 

Smoking has also been a health concern for years. It can contribute to lung cancer and heart disease. With the spread of COVID-19, it’s more important than ever to quit cigarettes and vape pens. Keeping your lungs healthy and clear will reduce your risk of being seriously impacted by Coronavirus if you happen to contract it. 

Developing healthy habits and staying away from vaping and cigarettes will help you build a  strong immune system, which, in turn, will help you combat the disease. This is why it’s so important to keep these tips for general health and wellness in mind. Now is the time to start taking your health seriously so you can make better choices for your mind and body. Starting these habits now will make them easier for you to stick with once you’re back on campus. 

BIO: Dan Matthews is a writer with a degree in English from Boise State University. He has extensive experience writing online at the intersection of business, finance, marketing, and culture.

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How To Incorporate Meditation Into Your Routine

July 2, 2020

Meditation is a great tool that allows students to destress and integrate moments of stillness into their everyday routines. It may feel intimidating to start a meditation practice, but you do not need to meditate for long periods of time or have a completely blank mind to be meditating correctly. Meditation can become a part of your day in subtle ways that will make a big difference. Here are some examples of ways you can integrate meditation into your daily routine. 

  1. Meditation Apps

If you have an interest in meditation you have likely heard of apps such as Headspace and Calm. These apps provide both short and longer meditations that will meet you where you are comfortable. Guided meditation is used by both new and seasoned meditators. It can be helpful to be guided through the process of meditation to maximize the time you are setting aside. 

  1. Enjoy your food

Mediation is not all about breathing. You are able to find mindfulness when setting aside time to be present and engage your senses. The time you spend eating can be utilized to create a moment of stillness in your routine. If you set aside a moment to eat one of your meals alone without any distractions you can more fully focus on the taste of what you are eating. 

  1. Take time to breathe during your chores

As a busy student, you may not have time to set aside time for meditation. A lack of time does not have to stop you from starting a meditation practice. You can meditate in simple ways like when you are walking to your next class, when you are doing the dishes, or even brushing your teeth. As long as you are being mindful of your task, there are so many possibilities for moments of meditation.

  1. Listen to music

Music can have a great impact on your state of mind. It can be valuable to take time to listen to soothing music and calm yourself. If you are feeling anxious over an upcoming exam or any other troubles, listening to music can quickly help to regulate your mood. 

  1. Mindful exercise 

Exercise is a great way to put aside time to center yourself and get in touch with your body and mind. Yoga is one form of exercise that emphasizes focusing on breath and stillness. Other forms of exercise such as strength training and cardio also include a focus on the breath and your body’s movement. You can also see what fitness resources are available at your school. There are also many virtual workouts available for free on apps such as Nike Training Club and on youtube. 

Meditation does not need to feel unattainable. You do not need to go all-in and meditate for 30 minutes away in total silence. Small moments of mindfulness add up and can improve your overall well being. Life as a student can be overwhelming so it is important to know the best ways for you to take care of yourself both physically and mentally. 

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Hard Time Sleeping? Here Are a Few Reasons Why

June 11, 2020

Understandably, there will be times in your college career that you have a hard time sleeping – sometimes, you might think pulling an all-nighter is the best way to get ahead with your studying. Other times, you might be consumed with anxiety over a difficult class. Or there could be other reasons you’re chronically having trouble getting quality sleep. Looking at those potential areas of trouble can help you to both improve your health and your concentration, and ultimately help you to do better in school.

Screen Time

As a college student in the digital age, you’re certainly getting a lot of screen time. Maybe you’ve got online homework, carry a smartphone, and you have easy access to other media on streaming services and social platforms. It’s easy to lie in bed at the end of the day and scroll through your phone, but this could be affecting you as you try to fall asleep. Research shows that screen time, especially right before bed, can make it hard for you to fall asleep. In fact, a study shows sleep can be interrupted in direct correlation with how much time you spend with your screen, meaning that 15 minutes of screen time might mean four minutes of less sleep, and so on.

Additionally, if you’re still in your teens or early twenties, your brain is still developing. Research shows your prefrontal cortex – the area in charge of higher reasoning – is still formulating up to age 25. Restorative sleep is vital in promoting a healthy brain, including cognitive function, hormone regulation, and metabolism. Lack of sleep can lead to obesity, depression, and other health issues. Turn off your screens – including your phones, iPads, laptops, desktop computer, and TV – two hours before you go to sleep to help your body understand that it’s time to shut down and get the restorative rest that you need.

Stress

College has its fun and joyful experiences and is a time to make new connections with your peers, and maybe even enjoy a social gathering or two. But there’s also a lot of stress – you may be living away from home for the first time, and there may be stress associated with living in close quarters with people you don’t really know well (and maybe aren’t compatible with). You may have been excited to start your college courses and have added on one too many classes. You may be changing your eating habits, exercise habits, and overall routine. All of it is a disruption, and it’s natural that you may face some disruption in your sleep as well.

A few tips can help you to manage the stress that can lead to sleep disruption. Take an honest look at your class schedule – you may be interested in that 300-level course in philosophy, but do you need to take it this semester? While your university experience is a time to explore different academic areas, work with your advisor to ensure you’re first getting the required courses in and not overloading yourself with classes, especially as you’re adjusting to college life. Make sure you have some healthy time just for you. Look into your college’s extracurricular offerings such as yoga and meditation classes for an extra way to relax– the time spent will pay off in better sleep and, therefore, a clearer mind.

Diet

It’s super easy to rely on pizza deliveries and junk food, especially when you’re stressed and short of time – but a poor diet, even for resilient young people, can actually increase your stress and therefore make it harder to sleep. While you may feel invincible in your twenties, a poor diet can have a long term impact on your health, including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. Think of it like starting a savings account – you may not have much in there to begin with, but it all adds up the older you get.

Take advantage of your college’s meal plan. Hit the salad bar and take advantage of the healthier offerings like vegetables, whole grain offerings, and fresh fruit. Or, if you’re on your own for meals and short of time, grab the pre-made salads and healthy meals from the grocery store. Additionally, stay away from the Red Bull and caffeine-boosters, to pull those all-nighters (which are terrible sleep interrupters anyway). And while you may have plenty of opportunities to socialize after hours, lay off the alcohol, which despite being a depressant, can actually cause you to lose quality sleep.

Remember, your college also may have free opportunities to see a counselor if your insomnia, stress, or alcohol use become problematic. Remember that you’ve made a major life change by starting your college career, and seeking additional help to adjust may be just the extra hand you need to sleep easier.

Health Other

Tips for Eating Healthy in College

January 21, 2020

When you are in college, especially if you are living on-campus away from home, it may be overwhelming to figure out how to eat. From the plethora of on-campus food choices to dining halls, it is easy to eat too many calories or go overboard during your first year at university. Here are some ways that you can ensure that you are eating well but still enjoying what your campus has to offer. 

Make Health Conscious Dining Hall Choices

One of the biggest advantages of living on campus is that you will have access to the dining halls, which more often than not are buffet or all-you-can-eat style. These can be to your benefit or detriment, depending on what you choose to indulge in when you decide that you want to have unlimited food options. If you are eating breakfast before heading to class in the morning, try opting for whole-grain alternatives rather than greasy bacon or a calorie-laden omelet. You should also be conscious of everything you choose to put on your plate. 

Use Dense Nutrition and Supplements

Even if you are trying to eat as healthy as possible, it may not be enough to be nutritionally sufficient so that your body can operate at its best. To combat this, it may be best to try supplements or condensed nutrition, which you can take in capsule form or add into smoothies and shakes. For instance, green or red superfood powder is often packed with fruits and vegetables that will give you energy and a myriad of health benefits. 

Find Easy Dorm Recipes

Living in the dorm rooms, you may think that you do not have any ways in which to cook on your own. However, there are many simple recipes that you can utilize if you want something to eat with only microwave access. Make a board on Pinterest or a simple list of microwave alternatives to some of your favorite foods, such as macaroni and cheese, the classic Top Ramen, and even desserts in mugs, like chocolate cakes or brownies. This way, you can eat from the comfort of your dorm, save money, and avoid going to the dining hall. 

Pack Filling Snacks

When you are on the go during the day, it can be all too tempting to stop for a slice of pizza or other indulgences in between classes. However, these snacks are often processed foods that contain calories your body will burn through quickly. Instead, try keeping some snacks in your backpack so that you can combat hunger without spending unnecessary money on calorie-laden options. Some great snacks that are nonperishable include whole wheat crackers, banana chips, trail mix, or whole-grain pretzels. Be sure to pack more than you think you need before you leave your dorm room for the day. 

You do not have to worry about gaining weight when you experience university life for the first time. With these tips, you are sure to be able to eat healthily and make the most out of living on-campus.

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

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Campus Care: Sickness and Strength at School

January 2, 2020

Going to college and living on campus is a new and exciting experience. Less exciting, however, is being sick and far away from home. Trying to overcome an illness and meet deadlines simultaneously can feel like trying to achieve mission impossible. 

The winter months are a prime time for people to come down sick, and this is especially the case for sleep-deprived students cramming for exams. If you’ve recently gotten sick, or are prone to doing so, here are a few ways that you can quickly recover and get back on your feet this winter. 

Beef Up Your Immune System 

When you’re sick, it’s sometimes instinctive to want to curl up in bed all day and binge on your favorite shows. Although this is a valid way to recover, you should also look for ways to strengthen your immune system by giving your body the nutrients it needs to fight off the illness and germs. 

WebMD recommends you eat enough fruits and vegetables, as studies show that people who do this don’t get sick as often. Consider vegetable soup or fresh fruit juices. Drinking enough water is also important, as it will flush out illness from your system and keep you hydrated.

Be sure you are practicing proper hygiene, as well, to avoid getting yourself and others sick. Do this by washing your hands for at least 20 seconds, or the duration of a rendition of “Happy Birthday” or the ABCs, and covering your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing. Disinfecting your room and hands will also help keep the germs away. 

Look for Helpful Resources 

Most college campuses have health and medical services on campus or in the surrounding area. Find out where yours is located, what hours they’re open, and if they have walk-in services. This would be helpful if you’re experiencing symptoms like a temperature above 102, abdominal pain, vomiting, severe headaches or any other worrying symptoms.  

Although a common cold or flu is something you can typically get through on your own, you should still reach out for support. Tell your family and friends that you aren’t feeling well so they can help you with things like picking up medications, bringing meals, and tidying up if you’re too weak to do it. 

If you’re feeling mentally and emotionally overwhelmed, make the best use of resources student care offers, whether it be a counselor or other mental health services, as your mental health has a profound effect on your physical health. Efforts are being made to make mental, emotional, and physical care more accessible to students. Seeing if they can help you in any way could mean you’re opening yourself up to receive collective and community support. This will, hopefully, help you get back to feeling better holistically and improve your performance long-term.

Get Enough Rest 

Sleeping is a critical part of recovery when you’re under the weather. However, college students often struggle to sleep because they’re pulling all-nighters, working part-time, or dealing with stress. In light of this, try your best to get enough sleep and not feel guilty about it. Getting into the routine habit of sleeping enough is not only good for you when you’re ill, but it can improve your academic performance. You’ll feel well-rested, less stressed, and be able to more easily concentrate. 

If you’re worried about how you’ll meet your deadlines, remember being down and out with the flu doesn’t mean that you can’t do anything else. Organize your workload while you’re in bed resting and do less strenuous but urgent tasks. Don’t overexert yourself! The rest can be done once you’re feeling better. 

If you’re ever sick on campus, know that it isn’t something you have to endure alone. Surrounding yourself with a loving support system and practicing self-care is the best way to get well soon.

BIO: Dan Matthews is a writer with a degree in English from Boise State University. He has extensive experience writing online at the intersection of business, finance, marketing, and culture.

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Ways Students Can Manage Their Mental Health

October 15, 2019

Back to school means change, which brings opportunities or maybe anxiety. Mental health is important to living your best life. College life prepares you for the future in many ways. Here are some tips to help manage your mental health for back to school. 

Set some personal goals for yourself

It’s important to have short term and long term goals. They can range from wanting to read a new book by the end of the month to putting yourself out there by joining more clubs or maintaining a certain percentage in a class. How can this be helpful? Making more friends in college can grow your network, helping you get a job after graduation. Or reading that new book may help you write that paper or give you inspiration for a class project. 

Organize your calendar and manage your time 

Staying organized and sticking to a schedule for outside your classes will help keep you grounded. You know you best, so be honest with yourself when scheduling study blocks, friend time and relaxing time. Check out our blog post on 4 Ways to Improve Your Time Management and Increase Productivity. Remember: you can study, work out and eat with friends – you don’t have to sacrifice your social life. 

Find the outlet that works best for you

Having an outlet can help you sort out your thoughts and feelings. Some great options include journaling and meditating to creating artwork or working out. Outlets and hobbies can help manage your mental health for many reasons both physically and mentally. 

Seek out on-campus resources to manage your stress and mental health

Many of your university’s resources are included in your tuition which is a no brainer but can be easy to forget. If you feel like your anxiety and stress levels are becoming too much to handle academically, be sure to talk to your academic advisor and let them know how you are feeling about classes and workload. They will be able to recommend and help with finding a solution that works best for you. Tutors are an amazing resource as well. Peer tutors can help you with tips and tricks for class materials and share helpful insights on some professors’ teaching styles. Be sure to check with your university or RA about all the available resources for students.

Pets

Leaving Fluffy and Fido at home can be the hardest part of leaving for college. Since college housing will not allow them, there are solutions! One option is to volunteer at the local shelter. Shelters can often use the help and the animal’s benefit need and want your love and attention as much as you. Pet sitting is also a great way to get some love as well as making some cash. You can find different ways to get your pet fix on campus if you know where to go.

When all is said and done, there are so many things that can help with your mental health in college. Don’t disregard it and do what you can to keep your spirits lifted! Overall, don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need it. Be sure to locate your school resources if you ever need them.

If you or someone you know is struggling with mental health and needs some support, visit jedfoundation.org/help for resources.

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6 Life-Changing Healthy Habits for the Busiest College Student

September 11, 2019

College is a great place to learn, make friends, and try new things. With so much to juggle, you may notice your health taking a backseat. No need to worry, though. Here are a few simple healthy habits you can start implementing right now to set yourself up for success!

1. Don’t Skip Meals

When you’re constantly on-the-go with a hectic schedule, it can be difficult to eat three proper meals throughout the day. You may start to miss or even skip meals, leading to weight and energy changes and disruption of your overall health. Eating every few hours is crucial for your health as it helps keep your brain alert and elevates your mood. 

2. Join a Fitness Class

Trying to find the drive to go to the gym each day can be nearly impossible when you’re in college. However, staying active is crucial for various aspects of your health. It promotes restful sleep, weight maintenance, energy, and serves as a great stress reliever. If the gym isn’t your thing, there are various easy ways to get moving and maintain motivation. Most colleges offer fitness classes for credits, which is great for not only prioritizing your fitness but boosting your GPA as well. 

3. Take Care of Your Skin

Your skin serves as an external reflection of what’s going on inside of your body. Anything from stress, poor hygiene, eating habits, to your water intake can affect the health of your skin. As a college student with a full agenda, it’s not uncommon for your skin to experience some adverse changes. First, reflect on potential external factors, such as stressors and diet, and determine what you can do to combat these. From there, work on creating a skin-care regimen that’s easy to follow. Your skin will be back on track in no time!

4. Utilize Telemedicine

Telemedicine allows you to connect directly with a healthcare professional online. From there, you can receive a proper diagnosis and even a prescription sent straight to your door. Too sick to go to the doctor? This is the perfect time to speak to a health professional online. Or, if you’re in a new city where you don’t have a specialist, you can leverage telemedicine to get the care you need. Are you taking care of your skin with a new regimen as suggested in section 3, but nothing’s changing? Contact a dermatologist online to get a prescribed acne treatment sent right to your dorm room. Technology is making prioritizing your health even easier.

5. Avoid Liquid Calories

Getting that caramel macchiato before class sounds like a great idea to stay caffeinated, but is it really? Many coffee beverages are filled with sugar, causing you to crash much harder later. Sodas, certain teas, and energy drinks can also contain large amounts of sugar as well. Try to swap your coffee for a plain one and trade flavored drinks for water to stay hydrated throughout the day. If you’re not a fan of water, try infusing fruit into a water bottle for added flavor. 

6. Practice Stress-Relieving Techniques

College can be stressful, there’s no doubt about it. Although you can’t always prevent stress from happening, you can find healthy techniques to help you deal with stress. It’s important to find a technique that works specifically for you and your needs. Common methods include yoga, meditation, walking in nature, journaling, talking it out, or going for a run. Once you find one that you enjoy, be sure to practice it whenever you’re starting to feel overwhelmed.

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Getting The Most Out of Life by Planning for Graduation

June 25, 2019

College is a liberating time in a person’s life. The time right before graduation is a last chance to get some fun in. It’s an opportunity to grow with the full freedom of both time and youth and to consider the future before you’re forced into it. That’s why it’s important to focus on three very important points before you graduate.

Learn How And What To Cook

It is important to learn the valuable skill of cooking before graduating from college. A poor diet takes considerable time to hurt us and it could be years or even a decade after graduation before you realize how tired and out of shape you’ve become.

When you learn early, you’ll have the time you need to find healthy foods that you actually like. It’ll not only set you up for a healthy life after graduation but it’s also a fantastic skill to share with others in your life.

Get An Early Start On Fitness

Like with your diet, when you realize that you need rather than want to focus on it you won’t have the time. When you’re still in school you’ll have the chance to really test what workouts work best for you.

You’re also using this time to figure out if the workout is something you could keep up for the rest of your life. If it’s not, this is the chance to try something new or modify your routine until it’s maintainable. Plus, there are quite a few additional benefits to working on physical fitness.

You’re developing an important tool that’ll help you be there for the people you care about. There’s something fantastic in the knowledge that your body is strong enough to ensure you can be of help in times of danger or stress.

Physical fitness is a great way to regulate your mood. Amazingly enough, it even serves as an effective treatment for some mental illness. For example, exercise and fitness often help people suffering from depression.

Travel And Study In A Distant Land

It’s essential that you get some travel and vacation time in before you graduate. People tend to assume that they’ll have all the time in the world for travel. But in reality, vacations tend to become more and more scarce over time.

Any student capable of doing so should consider looking into any chance to study abroad. Different cultures tend to be a bit healthier than ours in regards to diet and fitness and getting that help early on can provide a number of benefits down the road.

There are many benefits to focusing on building a foundation of wellness in college and taking advantage of opportunities that are presented to you. This is a critical time in your life and there is no reason to squander it. GradGuard is committed to aiding college students by protecting their investment in their education and protecting the items that are most important to them.

Follow @GradGuard on social media for more advice on how to make the most of your college experience.

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

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5 Ways to Stay Mentally Healthy During Finals Week

December 12, 2018

Exam period is stressful for every student, regardless of how great your grades are. Some students stress out way too much and it eventually affects their mental health. If you do not want to get into the same situation – check out our advice on how to stay mentally healthy during your finals week below.

Stay organized

Most students, especially not the most successful ones, start panicking before their finals. This often is resulted in them nervously jumping from one subject to another, trying to learn the semester’s material in one week. Let’s be realistic here, that is not going to happen. There is something you could do though. Set yourself a strict schedule and follow it. It is better to learn half of the material but with the full effort put into it, than to know random facts that most likely will not save you during the exam.

Get enough sleep

It is crucial that you get plenty of sleep, especially during those stressful weeks of exams. A good night’s sleep reduces your stress level and makes you memorize things quicker. Make sure you include at least 8 hours of sleep into your daily schedule.

Positive attitude

How often do you hear teenagers say something like ‘if I fail this exam my life is over’? Well, the thing is that the more you think like this, the bigger is the chance that you actually might fail. Do not put unnecessary psychological tension on yourself, exams are not the end of the world. Do your study, be positive and relax during the examination process – you will remember things much easier this way. Remember when Ron Weasley won the match because he thought he drank the magical portion? That is the same trick here. Positive thinking.

Exercise

Recent research shows that exercising does not only make wonders to your body, but to your mind as well. By including short workout breaks into your schedule, you will greatly reduce your stress level and anxiety. Therefore, you will study more productively. And that is the aim here, right?

Eat well

If you are on a diet – exam week is the perfect time to end it. This is the time that your body will most likely be in a lot of stress. In this case, you will need as much ‘body fuel’ as you can get. But that does not mean that you have to stuff yourself with soda and junk food. Eat healthily but do not limit yourself too much. You can even eat cake once in a while – your brain sure does need sugar.

So these are the basic 5 rules for you to follow during your exam week. If you do not neglect these, your success rate will go up during this stressful week. GradGuard is there for you during finals week and wishes you luck where you need it the most!

BIO
Daniela McVicker has been writing as a hobby for quite a while. Over the past couple of years, she has been a successful contributor to various websites. Now she is working as a writer and editor at Topwritersreview.

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Watch Your Waste!

August 17, 2018

Whether you’re living in a dorm or somewhere off campus, those weekly trips to the grocery store are essential as you need to pack on the proteins to fuel your body and brain for those long nights of study. Can you even begin to count how many plastic bags you have taken home and dispose throughout those trips? It’s probably too much to count even if you have hundreds of fingers.

Plastic bags are one of the most common pollutants in landfills that pose as a major threat to wildlife. Many marine animals mistake plastic bags for food and end up ingesting these toxic debris that continue to float around the ocean. The intake of plastics is not only harmful to the animals but can also have a negative impact on humans as it transfers the debris up to bigger fish and marine animals, in which we consume and end up ingesting these tiny pieces of plastics ourselves.

What can we do to eliminate these wasteful and destructive plastic bags you may ask? The answer is reusable grocery bags. You can find these bags at almost any grocery stores that you shop at for an affordable price. For instance, Trader Joe’s offers eye-catching and sturdy reusable bags at the cost of only $1.00 each. They also offer an incentive for those who choose to use their own bag instead of taking one from the store. Students and adults alike, you are eligible to enter into a raffle where you have the opportunity to win a $25.00 gift card. It might not sound like much, but for college students, that gift card can come in handy when you’re short on money for that weekly grocery trip.

Besides being environmentally responsible, another responsibility you should take on as college students is to purchase renters insurance in the events that your personal belongings are stolen, such as bikes and laptops. GradGuard offers worldwide property coverage that will cover you and your belongings everywhere you go for an affordable cost. For a free quote, go to https://gradguard.com/renters. It never hurts to check it out.