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driving in college

Adulting

How To Increase The Resale Value Of Your Car

November 4, 2021

Hardly anyone who buys a car expects to keep it forever. Many car owners choose to replace their vehicles as their needs change. For example, new parents might sell their roadster for a minivan; empty nesters relocating to a sunny state might sell their SUV for a convertible; and students leaving home for college might not need to bring their car to campus.

If you’re ready to sell your car from high school, here’s what you need to know to raise its resale value.

Questions to Ask Before Taking a Car to Campus

Most college campuses have all the amenities that students need — such as dining, entertainment, shopping and laundry facilities — within a few blocks of their dorms or apartments. Many students learn that they can get almost anywhere just by walking, biking or taking public transit.

For some college students, owning a car might be more trouble than it’s worth. Aside from buying gasoline and paying for insurance, students might get sticker shock when they learn how much they’ll need to pay to park a car that they barely use. Before you leave for college, be sure to investigate the campus parking arrangements.

Alternatives to Keeping a Car on Campus

If having a car on campus isn’t an option, there are usually alternative modes of transportation available. Municipal transportation systems usually offer bus routes from campus to popular destinations around town. Check the local transportation website to see if you can ride the bus or rail systems for a discounted student rate. Besides bus and rail service availability, you might not need a car on campus if:

·  A friend or roommate already owns a car

·  A bike or skateboard works just as well

·  Ride-sharing services are plentiful

After you weigh the pros and cons of keeping a car on campus, it might make more sense to sell the high school car before college begins.

Tips to Ensure Good Resale Value When Purchasing a Car

No matter when you decide to purchase or sell a vehicle, there are steps you can take to ensure you get the most money for it when it’s time to sell.

·  Purchase a car that’s a neutral color. A car that’s fire engine red or electric blue, although eye-catching, tends to draw more attention than the average person wants when behind the wheel.

·  Purchase a car with an automatic transmission rather than one with manual. Only 18% of Americans know how to drive a car with a stick shift.

·  Purchase an extended warranty for the vehicle.

·  Wash your car regularly to maintain the exterior paint. Damage from salt or other corrosives can occur whether you live in the snowy north or near the ocean.

·  Detail the interior of the car to prevent permanent stains or damage from ground-in sand, dirt or debris.

·  Protect your car from the elements. Covered parking is good; secured garage parking is even better.

·  Fix dents and scratches in the body and chips in the glass immediately, before they get worse. Sudden changes in air temperature can transform a tiny chip into fully cracked windshield.

For more tips to increase the resale value of your vehicle, check out this infographic.

AUTHOR BIO: Sam Combs is the founder for Chrysler Factory Warranty, an Internet-only provider of genuine factory-backed Chrysler Service Contracts. He has 18 years of experience in the industry and focuses on offering customers the same Chrysler coverage plan for less.

Adulting Student Life

Learning to Drive in College

March 10, 2021

There is really isn’t a perfect time to learn how to drive. While it may be common for people to get their driver’s license in high school, for some, it may not be the right moment. Furthermore, accessibility plays a major role in learning how to drive at a young age. Not having a car or lack of affordable lessons can be just a few reasons why someone might not learn to drive before heading off to college.

With that being said, there are a number of benefits to learning how to drive — especially for the average busy college student. It can provide a greater sense of independence and open the door to new adventures, as just a few examples. It can also make commuting between classes, internships, and extra-curriculum activities a bit easier, especially if your current city or school campus lack public transportation services.

Whether you’re about to graduate or just starting your freshman year, learning to drive in college doesn’t have to be intimidating or daunting.

Let’s Be Crystal Clear

There’s a lot to look forward to once you learn how to drive, but before that happens it’s important to do a bit of housekeeping first. Ahead of setting up driving classes or arranging a testing appointment, it’s worth getting your eyes checked.

Your vision needs to meet a certain standard before you’re allowed to hit the roads. Of course, finding a convenient eye doctor while in college isn’t always the easiest or most affordable. Luckily, there are eyewear services that allow you to try certain eye prescriptions and accessories at home. Having slightly blurry vision might not be a huge problem while in class or walking around, but it’s extremely dangerous as a driver. Make sure your vision is crystal clear before getting behind the wheel, even if that means investing in a new pair of glasses.

Get Ahead of Traffic

There are a number of surprises and challenges drivers can encounter on any given day. However, one thing that is not at all surprising to the average seasoned driver is traffic. Depending on the city where you attend school, traffic congestion could be a major factor you need to keep in mind while driving. Researching things like your college town’s local traffic patterns can help you learn more about what roads are best to avoid at what times. It’s also essential to study high-traffic rules and other safe driving practices to ensure the safety of yourself and other drivers. It’s a lot easier to manage things like sudden speed reductions, lane merging, and aggressive rush-hour drivers if you know what to expect beforehand. 

Start With Familiar Places

Like with most things in life, practice can help improve your confidence, but particularly as a new driver. Considering that driving is often much more than pressing your foot on the accelerator, a great way to build up your driving skills is with short and familiar routes. Whether that’s to a nearby park or to the bodega down the road, you can build up your driving skills, improve your reflexes, and work on your weakness without the pressure of navigating a new area.

Even though we’ve agreed there’s no right or wrong time to learn how to drive, there can still be some anxieties surrounding learning to drive at an older age. You can feel judged or embarrassed about not having a driver’s license yet, but don’t let those feelings stand in the way of your goals. Good luck!

BIO: Sam Bowman has a passion for learning. As a seasoned professional writer, he specializes in topics about people, education, tech and how they merge. In his spare time he likes running, reading, and combining the two in a run to his local bookstore.