Browsing Tag

dorm living

Health Other

Essential Recipes for College Students

September 6, 2019

As a college student, you are probably already sick of eating at the dining hall and eating out can be way too costly. There is a solution to this issue! You don’t need a full kitchen to have a delicious meal. You can cook something great right inside your dorm room. Here are some recipes that are perfect for college students!

2 Minute Omelette in a Mug

This is the perfect recipe for a student who is looking for a quick breakfast in the morning. You can get a boost of protein from this customizable microwavable meal!

Two Minute Thai Peanut Noodles

This is a recipe that reinvents your typical bag of ramen noodles. Adding only a few ingredients takes a cheap and ordinary meal and turns it into something special! 

Peanut Butter Banana Wraps

This is a simple and easy to assemble recipe! If you have a busy day this is a great option for a meal you can eat on the go.

 5-Minute Vegetarian Burrito Bowl

Whether you are a vegetarian or not, this is a great lunch or dinner option for any college student. With only a few ingredients you can assemble a tasty and healthy meal in the comfort of your own room. 

Chocolate Cake in a Mug

Mug cakes are delicious and easy to make! It could be fun to invite some friends over to make mug cakes in your dorm on a cold day. 

These recipes are easy to make and will be a refreshing change of pace from dining hall food. Cooking is a fun activity to do with friends or even on your own! Having a few recipes available to make in your dorm for when you don’t want to go to the dining hall will come in handy. Experiment with these recipes and look for some of your own to figure out what works best for you!

Other Student Life

Do College Students Need Renters Insurance or Does a Homeowner’s Policy Provide the Right Coverage?

July 1, 2019

In 2019, the average college family spent an average of $976.78 per student on back to college shopping. You need a lot of things for college, but are those belongings safe in your residence hall or off-campus apartment? As you pack up your things for school, you may want to consider ways to protect your stuff. Insurance is one way to protect these items by offering financial protection in the case of a loss. However, it can be confusing to know what kind of insurance you need to protect your belongings (and liability!) and how much that can cost.

The first step is to determine whether your parents have homeowners insurance, then ask them about the terms of that insurance. Will it extend to cover you while at school? Is it enough coverage? If the answer is no to either of these questions, you may want to consider Renters Insurance. But how do you know what to get?

Luckily, I had the opportunity to sit down with GradGuard founder and insurance expert Bill Suneson to get the scoop, which is summarized for you below.

When a student moves into a residence hall, typically the terms of the housing agreement make it clear that the school is not responsible for stolen or damaged personal property. Also, the student becomes personally liable for any damage caused to the dorm room or residence hall. The same applies to most rental agreements if you move into an apartment off-campus. Without the proper insurance, you (and your family) can incur a significant financial loss if you cause unintended damage to your residence or suffer a loss to your personal property. For example, if you burn the wall making a late night snack, or someone steals your bike, without insurance the burden is on you to replace those items and pay for the damage.

GradGuard College Renters insurance is an easy and affordable way to protect your personal property against theft, water damage, fire, etc.  It is not uncommon for a laptop computer or bicycle to be stolen from a dorm (you can probably name a friend this has happened to) and most low-deductible renters insurance plans would provide a quick replacement.

Also, a renters insurance plan protects students if you are personally liable for causing damage to your residence – colleges or building owners would promptly bill you for your portion of the loss. It’s not something you would necessarily think about when you’re excited to move in and start the semester, but just remember about how easy it could be to inadvertently trigger the sprinkler system if you caused a small fire cooking in your kitchen.  That’s a lot of money and damage that you’d be responsible for. Without the proper coverage, you may find yourself with a hefty bill.

GradGuard is just one way to protect yourself. You may already have some coverage thanks to your parents. Yes, most homeowner’s insurance policies do extend coverage to students when they are away at college. However, your parents should review their policy closely before you leave for college as some policies may have certain limitations.  For instance, policies may limit coverage to students attending college full-time or living on-campus (even more restrictions if the student is living off-campus.)

But there are some things to consider about a homeowner’s insurance policy that you should discuss with your parents. Most homeowner’s policies have high deductibles and families are unlikely to file claims such as a $500 bike theft because the payment would not exceed their deductible.  Also, home insurance rates are increasing and filing small property or liability claims generally result in higher rates for your family over time.

With deductibles as low as $100 and most premiums about $.50 a day, GradGuard College Renters Insurance is both valuable and affordable for students even though some coverage may exist through their parents’ homeowner’s policy.  Spend a couple minutes reviewing this information with your parents to figure out what will work best for you and your family. You may find you feel comfortable with the cost of replacing your personal items and decide against coverage altogether, but you may find you want some protection. As always, speak with an agent to find the best policy for you. Happy packing!

This article was updated in July 2020

Other Student Life

Picking the Right Renters Insurance Deductible

February 20, 2019

College offers many young adults the first opportunity to live in their own apartment or share one with friends. But living independently can leave you financially exposed to unexpected disasters, like fires or burglary. Renters insurance—sometimes required by apartment complexes—offers a form of relatively inexpensive financial protection from these risks. And you’ll want to pick the right deductible to balance both coverage and costs.

What Is a Renters Insurance Deductible?

When you make a renters insurance claim, the cost of any covered event is split into two parts: the amount you pay and the amount your insurance pays. Your share of the cost is the deductible, with your insurance company paying the balance.

If your policy has a $1,000 deductible and you file a claim for $1,500 of stolen items, you’ll be expected to cover $1,000 of that claim. Your insurance company will pay $500 to cover the expenses of replacing your lost items.

How Deductibles Affect the Cost of Insurance

Renters insurance deductibles can have a notable impact on the price of your renters insurance. When you purchase a policy with a high deductible, you’ll pay a lower rate for your insurance. The reverse is also true: A lower deductible results in a higher rate.

If you file a claim for the theft of $1,500 in personal belongings and have a $500 deductible instead of $1,000, your insurance company will pay you $1,000 to cover the damage. However, your renters insurance policy will cost more, likely a few extra dollars per month.

How to Pick a Deductible

How do you decide between higher or lower deductibles? There are a few things to consider.

A higher deductible will get you a lower premium. However, you’re also increasing the costs of replacing your property should a loss event occur. It is a cost-saving measure in the short term, but in the event you make a claim, you’ll pay more money than you would with a lower deductible.

College students who can afford to pay more money out of pocket and have expensive items to cover may consider a lower deductible. The premiums will be higher, but if you need to file a claim, the insurer covers a larger share of your costs.

Unique Risks for College Students

College students should also consider the risks posed by their location and roommates. If your apartment or rental is located in a high-crime area, you’re more likely to experience a theft. Roommates also represent a risk, as they may be the cause—directly or indirectly—of thefts, fires or other potential losses covered by your renters insurance. The higher your risk, the more appropriate it is to select a low deductible.

College students own thousands of dollars in property, and financial protection for all these items is important. The average cost of textbooks and class-related supplies can be over $2,000, according to CollegeBoard. And even if you have digital versions of your class materials, your laptop and other electronic equipment are high-value items that are at risk for theft or destruction. Picking the right deductible will help you balance affordability with financial protection.  GradGuard offers low deductibles to benefit students the most. Get a quote at any time online on our website!

Other Transition

Dorm Life: Expected vs. Reality

January 29, 2019

What you think about dorm life is probably different to the reality of living in a dorm. One thing’s for sure – you want to be prepared. Here’s what you need to know.

How to get the most out of living in a dorm

Reggae legend Bob Marley could have been giving advice about how to approach dorm life when he said: “Life is one big road with lots of signs. So when you riding through the ruts, don’t complicate your mind. Flee from hate, mischief, and jealousy. Don’t bury your thoughts, put your vision to reality.”

Good advice, but if you haven’t had an older brother or sister who’s lived through the dorm experience, what you expect from dorm life and what you get is not always going to be the same thing. One thing’s for sure – you want to be prepared for life in a dormitory!

Why live in a dorm at all?

  • Living in a dorm or campus house is the best way to transition to college life – we’ll tell you why.
  • It’s expensive to finance an apartment off-campus for the duration of your stay.

The highs of life in a dormitory

  • Living in a dormitory puts you in the middle of things. You’re part of the university community and just a stroll or brisk walk from classes – now your 8:00 a.m. start doesn’t seem quite so painful.
  • You have facilities and amenities at your disposal – study rooms, the library, and dining hall which means you don’t have to shop for groceries or try to get to grips with mom’s mac ‘n’ cheese recipe. Having access to a gym and laundry’s cool, and your room will already be wired for the Internet and Wi-Fi.
  • You’ll never feel alone. You’ll be surrounded by fellow freshmen all experiencing what you’re going through. Most people will tell you that some of the best friendships of their lives were made in a university dormitory.
  • Living in a dorm means you expand your horizons by meeting people of nationalities and backgrounds you’ve never mixed with before. You’re all one big dorm family united around a new adventure. And there’s always an insomniac to hang out with when you can’t sleep.

How to prepare for the lows of dormitory life

  • Space and privacy are the biggest battles of dormitory life. If you’ve shared a bedroom with a sibling who talks in her sleep, you’ll probably find the experience of sleeping a few feet from a stranger a bit easier.
  • Dorm bathrooms are a whole new experience. You’ll need to assert your right to good hygiene and get used to showering in flip-flops.
  • Quiet time is a luxury. You probably haven’t guessed how much noise a bunch of undergraduates living in close proximity can generate. Make sure you’re never without good quality headphones.
  • Get ready for independence. You might have been dreaming about a complete lack of parental control for years now, but many freshmen find it hard to get to grips with the responsibility of freedom. Yes, you’ll have RAs and staff members keeping an eye on you, but you’ll need to get yourself up and ready for class without your mom’s voice calling softly in your ear.

Living with your dorm decision

It may take a couple of months, but most students count their dorm experience as one of the best times of their life. If you end up hating the experience, keep in mind that it’s only temporary and off-campus living is an option.
Still undecided about which school to attend and the facilities on offer? This report takes an in-depth look at some of the top universities in the U.S. offering aviation and aeronautics courses, including a comparison of the cost, courses offered, course content and duration of study for each.

Regardless of what you decide, remember that GradGuard is here to help with all your Tuesday Tips, college hacks, and to increase your chances of excelling at adulting!

Health Other

Where to Go When You’re Sick in College

January 23, 2019

Since we are stuck in the middle of flu season there is a good chance that you could still get sick. If you can prevent that, you’ll be golden! However, it can be difficult to not get sick especially if you’re living in the residence halls. Being sick in college is, for me, one of the worst things ever. Not being at home with some family-made chicken soup and having someone take care of you is hard. This is especially hard if this is your first time away from home. Since you probably don’t have that comfort of being at home, you have to find it at school. Here are some tips on where to go when you’re sick.

Residence Halls

Being in the residence halls can be pretty hard if you’re trying to avoid getting sick. This is because you’re in close quarters and share the same hallways, elevators/stairs, and even bathrooms. Germs are everywhere. All residents should take care to wash your hands as much as possible, and if you’re sick you should try and stay in your room. You should also notify your teachers if you’re too sick to make it to class. Trust me, your teacher will appreciate you not showing up to class if that means that you’re preventing them from catching whatever you have. Make sure to figure out if you’ll need a doctors note to show proof of your absence.

The most important thing is to stay in bed and get the rest you need to get better. If you’re quite sick this can be difficult. Reach out to your friends, roommate or RA for help if you need it – they may be able to pick up some cough medicine, soup or whatever else you need on the way back from class. You don’t have to suffer through your cold alone!

Health Center

This is especially important. If you’re sick and think that you’re not going to get better anytime soon, go to the health center. The health centers are there for you for a reason; to help you get better! There are various doctors for different types of services that are trained for this exact reason. Make an appointment ASAP and get the help that you need. Don’t put it off until you get worse because your recovery time could be longer than you think, and appointments fill up – especially during flu season! If your recovery time is long, then you could potentially get behind in class and no one wants that.

Hospital or Urgent Care

Unfortunately, health centers at school aren’t open 24/7. Sometimes when you’re sick it gets to its worst point in the late night or early morning, or maybe over the weekend. Since the health center isn’t an option at those times, you should go to the hospital or urgent care. This, of course, is if you can’t wait until the health center is open. Some illnesses are worse than others and need the proper care that it deserves.

Going Home

This is obviously worst case scenario. If you are too sick to attend class, leave your bed, eat, or any other symptom, and it’s an option, you should try and go home. If your hometown is very far away, then this, unfortunately, might not be an option for you. However, if you are close enough to go home, this might be just what you need to make sure that you recover quickly and don’t get anyone at school sick.

If you’re sick in college, make sure that you know what all of your options are. Becoming healthy again is your main priority to having a successful school year and GradGuard is here to give you the tips on how to do it!

Other Student Life

Ways to Keep Your Dorm Warm and Cozy This Winter

January 22, 2019

With the winter chill freezing our bones on our walks around campus, the best part about coming back to your residence is feeling cozy and warm with the decor around your room! Here are a few ways you can keep toasty and feel nice and comfy in your dorm room this winter.

Hang Christmas Lights

That overhead lighting is less than stellar most of the time. However, hanging a strand or two of Christmas lights gives your dorm a completely different feel! The warm, staggered lighting is easier on the eyes and great for watching movies, reading a book, or listening to music.

Make Warm Drinks

Using your microwave or that new Keurig you got for the holidays makes for great hot drinks such as cider, tea, coffee, and hot chocolate! Wander around the grocery aisles and find something that really speaks to you and use your favorite mug to warm your insides after a cold day of walking around campus.

Get a Space Heater

Sometimes the dorm heater is not all it’s cracked up to be. Getting a small space heater can help add a little extra warmth to your small space! Be sure to plug it directly into the wall instead of a surge protector and turn it off when you leave for any reason, but it is a perfect addition to keep you warm on frigid days.

Invest in Fuzzy Slippers or Socks

Keeping your feet warm can make all the difference during the winter! Get yourself a few pairs of thick fuzzy socks and some new slippers to keep your feet happy this winter. Slip them on right when you get back to your dorm and you surely won’t regret it!

Hopefully, these things will keep you toastier as the winter keeps on keepin’ on. Spring is just around the corner so there is light at the end of the tunnel, but until then, stay warm with these tips from GradGuard!

Other Transition

How to be a Successful Freshman

December 17, 2018

Heading off to college or university is exciting, but it can also be stressful. After all, for most people, it’s the first time they’ve ever lived away from home, and they’re under a huge amount of pressure to get good grades and be rewarded the big investment it takes to study.

But how exactly can freshmen make the most of their time at college and survive their first year? And better yet, how can they not just survive but thrive? Here are just a few of the best tips to help freshmen to make the most of their time at college.

Take Responsibility

When you’re at college, you have no parents or siblings around to make sure that you get up and go to lectures. Instead, you need to take responsibility for yourself and force yourself to get up, to show up and to study.

Help Is On Hand

Just because you’re not surrounded by your friends and family, doesn’t mean that you don’t have any backup. The vast majority of colleges and universities provide support for their students for everything from mental health issues to laundry, cleaning, childcare and more. Don’t be afraid to take advantage of these services if they’re offered to you.

Nothing Is Set In Stone

The worst thing that you can do as a college student is to force yourself to keep studying a subject that you’re not enjoying. The good news is that when you’re a freshman, it’s not too difficult to change your major – but it gets more and more difficult the longer you wait.

Luxuries Are Luxuries

When you’re living away from home for the first time, it can be tempting to take all of your belongings with you and to spend money as though there’s no tomorrow. The problem is that life as a student isn’t a life of luxury, and it’s often best to save money where possible and to get used to living a more simple life, with less “stuff” and fewer luxuries.

Exercise Is Important

The phrase “Freshman 15” exists because most people put on weight when they first head off to college. You can combat this by exercising regularly, and it’s also a good idea to work out because it can help you to sleep and even to combat mental health issues. If you take care of your body, it’ll help you to take care of your mind.

When we head off to college to further our education, it’s one of the most exciting times in our lives. At the same time, there’s more to college than partying and socializing, and if you want to make the most of your freshman year then you need to put some effort in and go out of your way to make the year a success. With a bit of luck, the tips in this article and remembering GradGuard will help you to accomplish that.

Peter Hill is the best editor of BestEssayTips. He is a socially active person, likes traveling and photo/video editing. He finds himself in writing. Feel free to contact him on Google+.

Other Student Life

10 Tips to Help Boost Your College Budget

December 5, 2018

The broke college student subsisting on instant ramen noodles and mooching off their parents may be a tired cliché, but it still carries a kernel of truth: college isn’t cheap, and money is often very tight as a result. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be that way. If you’re having a hard time keeping your finances in the black during college, there are plenty of steps you can take to improve your situation. With a little bit of planning and ingenuity, the ten tips below can help ease your budget crunch and make sure that you’re getting the very most out of your college experience.

  1. Cut Costs on School Supplies

As any college student can attest, textbooks and other supplies can burn a hole in your wallet in a hurry. Rather than buying new books at the campus bookstore, consider looking for used books online, at local bookstores and even from friends and acquaintances. Alternatively, many modern textbooks can be purchased digitally and downloaded to a tablet or laptop for a much lower price than their physical counterparts. Many other supplies can be bought in bulk for big savings, and again it’s best to avoid campus bookstores and their inflated prices.

  1. Use Credit Cards Responsibly

When it comes to credit cards, there are two common and equally troubling approaches. Some people are tempted by the ability to simply flash some plastic and buy anything they wish, while others are scared away from using them entirely. In reality, there’s no reason to fear credit cards – if they’re used responsibly. In fact, using a credit card for routine purchases and paying off the balance in full each month is a fantastic way to begin building a strong credit history. Just be aware that interest rates are often exceedingly high, so don’t buy something you can’t pay for except in the event of a true emergency.

  1. Cook for a Week

Food is an expense that most college students simply don’t think about, but it can add up quickly. Eating out or signing up for a meal plan isn’t cheap, and relying on cold pizza and Hot Pockets isn’t very healthy. Instead, consider making your own meal plan by devoting a few hours on the weekend to cook meals for the entire week. Simply plan out whichever meals you’d like to eat, make a list of all the necessary ingredients and buy them all at once. Cook the meals, place them in containers and stick them in the freezer. When you’re ready to eat, all you need to do is take your chosen meal out and heat it up. Voila!

  1. Start a Savings Account

It’s never too early to start saving for a rainy day, and a savings account is a great way to do it. Even if you can only afford small, irregular deposits, you’ll be building a financial cushion and earning interest while you’re at it. Most importantly, you’ll begin developing the good saving habits that you’ll need to prepare yourself for the future. Take time to do your research and find the best interest rates available, but be sure to avoid accounts that require a monthly fee.

  1. Use Your Student ID

You may not realize it, but your student ID can be a major money-saving tool. You’ll find a variety of fun activities on nearly any college campus, and your student ID can often snag you a serious discount or even free admission. It’s a great way to stay engaged and enjoy yourself without shelling out much money. Your ID can also earn you savings from a wide range of other stores, venues and websites, so keep your eyes peeled for student discounts wherever you go.

  1. Use Alternative Transportation

If you’re accustomed to driving to and from class, you may not notice how much money you spend on gas and other transportation-related expenses. Whenever possible, consider using alternative means of transportation to save some extra cash. If your commute is short enough, walking or riding a bike is free and can help to keep you in shape. Public transportation is another cost-effective option, and it can even give you an opportunity to sneak in some extra work or studying.

  1. Do Your Homework on Student Loans

Student debt is a massive problem in the United States and managing it poorly can cripple your finances for years to come. Easing that burden begins before you borrow a single cent, as choosing the right loan can make all the difference. It pays to do your research, comparing all available options in search of lower interest rates and payment terms that suit your particular situation. In most cases, federal loans will be the most affordable option, as well as providing fixed rates and more flexibility. It’s also important to determine the smallest loan amount you realistically need, which will keep your balance lower and allow you to repay your debt more quickly.

  1. Work Smarter

Balancing work and school is no easy task, but it’s a financial necessity for many students. If possible, try to find a job that naturally fits into your typical schedule. Many employers near college campuses are willing to provide flexible hours for students, but it’s important to keep your employer updated on your schedule to avoid conflicts. You may even consider taking a job that pays slightly less if it affords you time to do schoolwork.

  1. Make the Most of Your Education

While it may not directly put money in your pocket, staying focused on your education will ensure that you’re getting the best bang for your buck. You’ll be paying for your schooling for quite some time, so it’s important that you get as much out of it as you can. If you go to classes, work hard and set yourself up to succeed in whatever you choose to do after graduation, it’ll be worth every penny that you spend. As an added bonus, spending your time on schoolwork means you’ll have less time to waste money on frivolous things. It may not be as fun in the moment, but your bank account – and your future – will thank you.

  1. Adopt Money-Saving Habits

College is a time to receive an education, but it’s also a time to learn valuable lessons that will serve you for the rest of your life. One of the most important lessons you can learn is how to manage your money, and in particular, how to develop good money-saving habits. Set aside some time every week to review your budget and look for opportunities to save some cash, whether it’s opting for generic brands and using coupons at the grocery store or making your own coffee in the morning instead of paying for an expensive cup at the coffee shop. Learning how to save a few dollars and cents now can make a big difference in staying financially healthy in the long run.

As you begin to “adult” a little more in your daily life, remember to check out GradGuard’s blog for all your college hacks!

 

Beth Kotz is a contributing writer for Credit.com. A graduate of DePaul University in Chicago, she has also been featured as a writer and editor for numerous energy, entertainment, and home blogs.

Other Student Life

Friendsgiving 101: A step-by-step guide to hosting

November 21, 2018

With spooky season behind you and cozy season upon you, it’s time to remind your besties how thankful you are to have them in your life. What better way to practice gratitude towards your friends than with Friendsgiving? Whether your feast is inspired by Pinterest or a host of different family traditions, your friends will be sure to indulge. Pour yourself a cup of hot apple cider and start planning your very own Friendsgiving with these simple steps.

Step One: Create a Facebook Event

Weeks prior to Friendsgiving, send out a Facebook event invite. This allows for a guesstimated headcount. Be sure to plan the time around college football or NFL games for the fans among us. If you are in an apartment complex with a community center, be sure to reserve it in advance as it can fill up around the holidays.  Remind your friends to secure a designated driver or take an Uber or Lyft if they plan on having libations.

Step Two: Make a Google Sheet to coordinate dishes

Seven bowls of mashed potatoes? Let’s hope someone remembered to bring the gravy.

Avoid duplicated dishes by creating a Google Sheet. Divide the sheet into categories and provide staple dishes with corresponding columns for guests to claim the dish with their name. Share this by providing the link in your Facebook event summary.

Step Three: Prepare 

A college budget doesn’t put Friendsgiving off limits. Stores like the 99 cents only and dollar tree have plenty of utensils fit for a crowd. Feeling green? Encourage your guests to bring their own glass containers for leftovers and reusable utensils like these that GradGuard hands out at conferences.

Be sure to empty out your fridge to make room for all of the dishes. Make note of how long each dish will need to heat up and where it can be heated (oven, stovetop, or microwave). Set up stations for appetizers and drinks, the main feast, and dessert. Designate bins for trash and recycle.

Step Four: Clearly label the turducken from the vegducken

It’s not uncommon these days to transform Grandma’s classic green-bean casserole into a vegan-friendly recipe. When your guests arrive with their dish, hand them an allergen card. Here they can label the name of the dish and they can circle if its considered gluten-free, vegan, vegetarian, dairy-free, or nut-free.

Step Five: Give thanks

Once all of your guests are seated with a mountain of food in front of them, it’s time for a toast. Remind your friends how grateful you are for having each one of them in your life. Give a cheers to the midterms being behind you and wish your friends luck in the remainder of the semester. They may think it’s corny, but have each person go around and say one thing about your collective friendship that they are most thankful for.

Step Six: Send your guests away with leftovers 

After everyone has loosened their belts a notch, have them get in line for one last round to fill their containers with leftovers until the pans are empty. Offer to clean the pan there or set a reminder to bring it back to them next time you see them.

GradGuard’s employees celebrate the company of one-another each year during a Friendsgiving with their sister company Bindable. From a Bindable Agent’s famous butterscotch bread to GradGuard QA Manager’s mac and cheese, the feast is an event to look forward to. We encourage you to bring Friendsgiving to your university dorm room or internship office, too!

Health Other

5 at Home (or in the Dorms) Cold Remedies

November 20, 2018

Living in a dorm where everyone is right in close proximity can open you up to a lot of things. Unfortunately, one of those things happens to be colds. And while there is not yet a cure for the common cold, there are simple things you can do at home to get you feeling better and back on your feet in time for finals week.

1. If you have a sore throat, strange as it sounds, it’s a good idea to gargle warm salt water. Adding a 1/4 tablespoon of salt to 8 ounces of warm water, and gargling it in the back of your throat can help relieve the pain. The salt helps wash away the nasty things in your throat that cause inflammation and swelling, thus cutting down on the pain in your throat.

2. A cup of tea with honey, while not actually possessing any medicinal qualities, can be a huge relief when you’re all stuffed up and sniffly. Hot tea loosens up your nasal passages and allows air to flow through them again, much in the same way as a nice bowl of chicken noodle soup.

3. Vitamin C is a big one for the prevention and treatment of colds, or really any minor illness. Found in things like citrus fruits, and many fruit juices, it helps cut down on inflammation and mucous and speeds up the production of white blood cells, which in turn speeds up healing. You can also take Vitamin C in pill form as a supplement – Airborne was our savior my freshman year – but many foods, including strawberries, peaches, and broccoli, have a surprisingly high supply.

4. Of course, the classic Vick’s VapoRub always helps clear a stuffy nose and congestion. Applying it liberally to your chest or feet before bedtime can work wonders, and at the very least, ensure you’ll get a good night’s sleep, and not stay up half the night blowing your nose or unable to breathe. If you don’t like the messiness of the rub on stuff, they now have patches you can place on your clothing that have about the same effect.

5. And of course, the most obvious one of all: sleep. In order to fight the infection in your body, lots of sleep is a necessity. Shut your door and close the curtains, and you’ll be asleep in no time. Chances are, your roommates will leave you alone for fear of getting infected themselves so you can nap for hours in peace.

College students are susceptible to illnesses, as well as other mishaps, so it’s important to take the proper precautions. Visit GradGuard for more information!