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college student

Health Uncategorized

Health Preparedness Tips for On-Campus Life

September 3, 2020

When you’re in college, living on campus can feel like a right of passage. It’s a great time to gain independence, have fun, and develop friendships you’ll have for a lifetime while enjoying the convenience and benefits of living where you go to school. 

Unfortunately, campus life looks a bit different this year. Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, colleges across the country have suspended in-person classes and have required students to leave campus. 

Some schools have closed their doors temporarily, while others will be shut down for on-campus living for the remainder of the school year. While the goal of the shutdown and the encouragement for social isolation is to flatten the curve of the Coronavirus spread, it can be a difficult transition. You must head home or go somewhere else for now. 

Whether you return to campus before the school year is over or you’ll be back next semester once things calm down, this is a good time to reflect on your health and wellness and what you can do to keep yourself safe, strong, and healthy. 

Managing Your Mental Health

Mental health is one of the biggest concerns facing college students today. Since many students across the country are being forced to stay home, issues like anxiety and depression are becoming more prevalent. 

Making your mental health a priority is a key factor to get you through this pandemic, but it’s also important when you return to campus. While college is an exciting and fun experience, it can also be overwhelming at times. Learning how to manage your stress levels can prevent you from getting sick. 

There are simple, everyday habits you can start to reduce stress: 

  • Get more sleep
  • Limit caffeine and alcohol
  • Talk to someone about your stress
  • Manage your time
  • Meditation/Yoga
  • Keep a journal

You can keep up with those habits as you get back to school and use them for the rest of your life to manage stress..

If your current stressor is being stuck at home, online learning might feel like your biggest hurdle. If you’re trying to adjust to online learning and having a difficult time, there are a few tips to make the experience less stressful: 

  • Create a designated learning space
  • Stick to specific hours of the day to study
  • Avoid distractions
  • Set personal goals

Give yourself permission to stumble. This is a learning experience for everyone and a time of great uncertainty. Don’t put pressure on yourself, and eventually, things will begin to fall into place and feel less stressful. 

Developing Healthy Habits Now

Exercising is a great way to stay healthy when stuck at home. Thankfully, there are no rules or regulations in place about going for a run outside or working out at home. 

Exercise can give you more energy, boost your mood, and reduce stress. Get into a daily routine that you can keep doing once you get back to campus. Adding a workout to your day has many benefits and can keep you focused when you’re back in school. 

It’s also a good idea to watch your diet while away from campus. It’s easy to fall into unhealthy habits when convenience food is so easy to come by, and apps like GrubHub and Postmates will deliver food right to your door. Making healthy nutritional choices will improve your mood and energy levels and lower your risk of illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure. 

Being stuck at home means it’s the perfect time to brush up on your cooking skills! Practice making healthy meals for yourself that could be made in a dorm room or communal kitchen. Making quick, easy meals that are also good for you will keep you motivated when it comes to making healthier food choices on campus. 

Reducing Your Risks

The Coronavirus can impact anyone, but it’s most deadly among those with pre-existing conditions or with lung and respiratory issues like those who regularly smoke or vape. Vaping has become hugely popular across the country, but the chemicals in many vape solutions can cause serious lung problems. 

Smoking has also been a health concern for years. It can contribute to lung cancer and heart disease. With the spread of COVID-19, it’s more important than ever to quit cigarettes and vape pens. Keeping your lungs healthy and clear will reduce your risk of being seriously impacted by Coronavirus if you happen to contract it. 

Developing healthy habits and staying away from vaping and cigarettes will help you build a  strong immune system, which, in turn, will help you combat the disease. This is why it’s so important to keep these tips for general health and wellness in mind. Now is the time to start taking your health seriously so you can make better choices for your mind and body. Starting these habits now will make them easier for you to stick with once you’re back on campus. 

BIO: Dan Matthews is a writer with a degree in English from Boise State University. He has extensive experience writing online at the intersection of business, finance, marketing, and culture.

Student Life Uncategorized

5 Perfect College Break Destinations

August 27, 2020

Feeling weighed down by the stress of college life? A memorable vacation may be just what you need to take a break from the books and clear your mind. Whether you’re looking to relax on the beach or explore a little bit of history, the following destinations are ideal for any college student craving a much-needed break.

1. Dubrovnik, Croatia

Croatia is a European destination gaining popularity among travelers due to its gorgeous beaches and cultural landmarks. Walk along the famous streets of Dubrovnik, Croatia, to encounter impressive architecture dating back to the Middle Ages. Consider taking a Croatia cruise to experience the beauty and history of this unique country.

2. Tamarindo, Costa Rica

Visit beautiful Tamarindo, Costa Rica, to enjoy one of the world’s most stunning beaches. The beaches here feature crystal blue waters and calm waves. A visit to this area’s beaches may even allow you to get up close and personal with local wildlife, as the great Leatherback Sea Turtles nest near Tamarindo between November and April. Spend your days taking in the natural wonders of the region, then head out for a night on the town to enjoy the vibrant local culture. If you’re looking to experience nature and nightlife, Tamarindo could be a great option.

3. Panama City, Florida

Florida has long been the go-to destination for spring breakers. In recent years, Panama City has solidified itself as a college break hotspot. After a day spent enjoying the sunny beaches, dance the night away in one of the many local nightclubs. Don’t forget to stop and have a meal and a drink at the famous Margaritaville. No matter when you visit Panama City, you’ll find yourself with endless options to relax and have fun.

4. New Orleans, Louisiana

Though the city is known for its Mardi Gras celebrations, New Orleans is a great destination to visit any time of the year. This historic city features unique architecture, delicious food, lively music and interesting local culture. The French Quarter is the center of all the action, with must-see destinations including Jackson Square, Decatur Street shopping and the raucous party atmosphere of Bourbon Street. No matter where you go in the French Quarter, you’re surrounded by a medley of interesting sights, sounds and smells. It’s clear that a trip to New Orleans is a great option if you’re looking to take a break from the stresses of college.

5. Niagara Falls, New York

For those looking for a more laid-back escape from the college grind, consider visiting Niagara Falls. For centuries, people have flocked to this unique natural landmark to experience the beauty and power of nature. Get an up-close look at the Falls by taking an afternoon cruise on the iconic Maid of the Mist, then continue your exploration of nature by visiting the Botanical Gardens or take a hike at Niagara Glen Nature Reserve. Spend a few days at the natural wonder that is Niagara Falls to take advantage of the healing properties of time spent in nature.

As a busy college student, you deserve a rest from your studies to relax and recharge. Check out each of these locations to take a break from the books and enjoy life.

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Health

Managing Your Mental Health in College

July 22, 2020

Mental health is becoming an increasingly big issue on college campuses. Many students struggle with the change and stress of college life. It can be valuable to investigate what you can do for your mental wellbeing. If you are struggling with your mental health, it is important to seek out resources available to you.

Here are some ways that you can better manage your mental health in college:

  • Visit your school’s counseling center

If you are having mental health concerns, you can always contact your school’s counseling services. Many schools provide free counseling or counseling at a reasonable rate. They can help you talk through whatever is troubling you or refer you to psychiatric services if needed. 

  • Utilize online resources

There are many resources available online to help you learn more about mental health and obtain support. U Lifeline, a project of the JED Foundation provides valuable support tailored to college students. Their website offers both resources and a helpline. Their website also provides a screener for students to evaluate their mental health and access their school’s resources. 

  • Practice meditation and exercise regularly

Meditation is a great way to center yourself and improve your mental health. It can be helpful to have tools that you can implement when you feel overwhelmed such as taking a few minutes to breathe or going for a quick run. 

  • Reach out to your loved ones

If you are struggling, take time to reach out to your support network. This can be Facetime with your family at home or even talking with new friends from college. Staying connected with others and communicating your feelings can relieve stress and prevent loneliness. 

  • Take time for yourself

When your calendar is filled with schoolwork and social events, it can be hard to find time to be by yourself. Set aside some time to be alone and recharge. You can go for a walk or go to a coffee shop and just take time to relax and reflect.

These are just a few suggestions on how to manage your mental health in college. You can find what works best for you and your experience. Find out what resources are available to you through your school and don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Health Uncategorized

How Being Eco-Friendly at College Can Save You Money

July 10, 2020

Embracing a greener lifestyle is a great way to improve your carbon footprint and help leave a positive impact on the world. But did you know that it can actually save you money, too? Here are some easy ways you can benefit financially from a more eco-friendly college experience

Avoid Single-Use Anything

If you haven’t already, it’s time to ditch the plastic water bottles and to-go coffee cups and opt for a more sustainable option. Every single minute, the world uses one million plastic water bottles, so do what you can to help cut back on that. Take it a step further with reusable grocery bags and avoiding disposable utensils.

Temperature Control

One of your sneakiest expenses can be hiding in your utility bills. Bouncing back and forth between temperatures can be costly, as well as bad for the environment. During warmer months, you’ll probably be tempted to crank the AC in order to stay cool. Instead of turning down the thermostat, you can keep your room cool without using as much energy by getting blackout curtains. You should also make sure that you’re only turning the light when you’re in the room and need it on. Check your air vents, or talk to your landlord or property manager, to make sure they don’t have any dust or debris buildup that could hinder your home’s cooling efficiency. 

Go Digital

Instead of taking notes on paper, try using your laptop or tablet instead. Not only will this save paper, but you’ll be spending less on notebooks and pens. You can even voice record your lectures and listen to them later on. 

Change Your Commute

Consider riding your bike to work. Not only will you incorporate a fun workout into your day, but you’ll also be helping to relieve stress. It can also help you save money on transportation expenses like gas and auto maintenance. If a bike ride doesn’t work for you, look into other options like carpooling or taking public transportation.

Re-think Your Textbooks

Tired of expensive textbooks that you’ll never use beyond that one course? Look into used book options! Many websites and local bookstores offer buy-back programs on previously-used books. Not only will this help you save money in the beginning, but it also gives you the potential to earn money back once you’re done with it. Another great option is to use digital versions of textbooks. Oftentimes you can buy downloadable copies right from the publisher, for pennies on the dollar of what the paper textbook would cost. An added perk? Many of these include updated annotations or dictation, so you can better follow and understand the content as you go. 

Get Thrifty

Why pay full price on anything when you can get great items for a fraction of the cost? Whether you’re looking for a quirky piece of furniture or new clothing, you can find just about anything in thrift stores if you look hard enough. 

Turn it Off

Turning off or unplugging electronics that you’re no longer using is one of the easiest ways to curb your use of power. Hit the lights when you leave a room, and unplug chargers when you’re done using them. Then take it one step further and cut back on your water usage while you shower, brush your teeth, or do the dishes.

Working towards a greener lifestyle doesn’t have to be an overnight thing. It’s a process, and it’s okay to take as much time as you need to ease into it. Making small changes through the day can lead to lasting effects down the line that your planet, and wallet, will thank you for. 

Adulting Uncategorized

Pets on Campus: 3 Rules for Keeping Pets at College

July 1, 2020

For young adults living alone for the first time, college can feel like the perfect time to finally adopt that lizard they weren’t allowed to have growing up; for those who grew up with animals, missing the family dog might feel like a black hole that desperately needs filling. Keeping a pet at college can be wonderful for both the owner, who’s gained a cute friend guaranteed not to copy their physics homework and the pet, who can enjoy companionship and a loving home. In any instance, before getting a pet you need to check with your residence and understand their pet policies. Assuming they do, college living also presents unique logistical challenges that students should take into account before adopting a furry, scaly, or feathery friend.  

  1. Respect your roommates. Since most college students live with other people, sharing a room, apartment, or house, they should take those other people into account when adopting a pet, and take their pet into account when searching for roommates. Dogs and cats, who roam the whole house or apartment and interact with all occupants, absolutely need the buy-in of all roommates if they’re going to enter a living space. Enclosure pets that stay in the owner’s room, like hamsters, lizards, or fish, only need enthusiastic buy-in from the folks living in said room, but everyone in the house should be aware of the animal – especially one that might sneak out of their cage and into other living areas. By making sure their roommates are ok with their pets before they move in, students will both protect their relationship with their roommates and ensure they’re living in an environment that’s good for their animal.     
  2. Respect your limits. College students are often busy, strapped for cash, and uncertain of their future, and pets, for all that they bring joy and companionship into someone’s life, can exacerbate these things. Students looking to get a pet should consider their own limits – on time, funds, travel, living space – before adopting a pet. Even seemingly low-maintenance pets, like cats or gerbils, can be expensive to provide for and have a need for attention and emotional energy from their owners. Animals are wonderful companions, but they’re also a responsibility, and college students should know how many things a pet could add to their already lengthy to-do list before adopting. 
  3. Respect your pet. This is the most important rule of pet ownership, in college or anywhere. While it’s understandable that college students experiencing independence for the first time might be desperate for an animal companion, the college lifestyle is not always good for an animal. For example, busy people living in small apartments should not adopt puppies who need attention all day and room to run – no matter how many cute girls walking said puppy attracts. Nor should people who move at least once a year invest in keeping chickens. The most important thing a prospective pet owner should consider is whether they are in a place to properly care for their pet – not just love, but care for. College students may love their dogs, but if they don’t have time to walk them every day, they’re not able to care for them. It’s a key distinction, and anyone looking to adopt a pet needs to be honest with themselves about their answer. 

Keeping a pet in college can be both incredibly rewarding and incredibly difficult. Of course, those struggling with the logistical challenges of pet ownership shouldn’t resign themselves to a life without animal companionship; some colleges bring “stress animals” to campus to help students relax during exams, and any town will need pet sitters and animal shelter volunteers. Everyone has room for animals in their life, if not their apartment. 

Adulting Uncategorized

Helping Students Transition into a Remote Learning Environment

June 26, 2020

For most of us, life today looks almost nothing like it looked just a few short months ago. The world’s major cities are virtual ghost towns. Schools and businesses worldwide are shuttered. Airports are mostly empty, as are our highways and interstates.

And “the college experience” meant something very different in the Spring of 2020 than it used to. If you’re an educator or administrator used to working with students in a traditional on-ground environment, chances are you’re going through quite an adjustment crisis yourself.

But now, more than ever, your students need you. And supporting them through this transition into the remote learning environment is going to mean more than finding new ways to teach your standard content. It’s also going to mean providing your students with the emotional support and practical advice they need to accommodate this new normal.

First Things First

The shelter-in-place orders that have been instituted virtually nationwide have meant that many colleges and universities have closed their dorms with very little advance notice. And, unfortunately, not every student is going to have parents, relatives, or friends to crash with until this crisis passes.

Supporting your students means helping to ensure they have their most essential needs met first before you start worrying about getting back to your curriculum. You may need to help students locate resources in their community to help with basic needs like housing and food. 

You can also advise them on strategies they can use to quickly secure safe and affordable housing on their own. Students might consider renting out a bedroom or motel room, or converting a shed or RV into their new, if temporary, digs.  

Tricking Out the Tech

Once students have safe and affordable shelter to ride out the pandemic, then they can start worrying about getting themselves set for online learning. Again, though, this could be a challenge for some students, particularly those who may have been relying on on-campus resources for their tech needs.

Fortunately, most communities, even in rural areas, now have access to at least 4G LTE network speeds. That means that students should be able to get fast, secure, and reliable access from their smartphones or tablets. 

Best of all, a host of productivity tools are available for download on Android and iPhone at low or no cost, including Google Docs and Microsoft Office. To be sure, “attending” online classes and doing homework on your smartphone isn’t exactly ideal, but it’s doable. And if this pandemic is teaching us anything, it’s how to make do.

Building a Virtual Community

And when it comes to making do, teachers have always been pros. Now is no different. You probably never could have imagined that you’d be ending the semester and potentially teaching a new one in front of a computer screen rather than standing before a sea of bright young faces, eager for summer break.

But here you are, and while teaching online is not the same as teaching on the ground, there are a few important similarities. The first, and most important, is the need to turn your class into a community. In fact, that particular need is more important than ever, as your students grapple with the fears, uncertainties, and, yes, the loneliness of lockdown. Fortunately, for many of you, the semester was well underway when the pandemic hit, meaning that you and your class had already had time to build strong relationships. 

Now is the time to affirm and strengthen those bonds, to provide a sense of continuity for your students, even as you transition to online learning. Continue to model the empathy, compassion, and humanity you have shown all semester, even though you must now do it from a distance. Your students need that now more than ever.

When you’re teaching online, it’s imperative that you model the same passion and the same level of presence that you exhibited on-ground. Try to be active and “visible” every weekday in your online classroom, from posting announcements to actively and frequently contributing to discussion forums. 

Be as positive and encouraging in your public communications as possible. Remember, also, that your students don’t have the benefit of your body language or tone of voice, so soften your written communications and use mild humor, if any. Provide emojis (used judiciously) to temper what may be read as a harsh or critical message, and be as clear and specific as possible in your instructions and class requirements. 

Not only will all this help your students succeed in the class, but it will also help them feel more confident and more engaged in the work. And it can provide a sense of normalcy and accomplishment in these troubled times.   

BIO: Dan Matthews is a writer with a degree in English from Boise State University. He has extensive experience writing online at the intersection of business, finance, marketing, and culture.

Health Uncategorized

Hard Time Sleeping? Here Are a Few Reasons Why

June 11, 2020

Understandably, there will be times in your college career that you have a hard time sleeping – sometimes, you might think pulling an all-nighter is the best way to get ahead with your studying. Other times, you might be consumed with anxiety over a difficult class. Or there could be other reasons you’re chronically having trouble getting quality sleep. Looking at those potential areas of trouble can help you to both improve your health and your concentration, and ultimately help you to do better in school.

Screen Time

As a college student in the digital age, you’re certainly getting a lot of screen time. Maybe you’ve got online homework, carry a smartphone, and you have easy access to other media on streaming services and social platforms. It’s easy to lie in bed at the end of the day and scroll through your phone, but this could be affecting you as you try to fall asleep. Research shows that screen time, especially right before bed, can make it hard for you to fall asleep. In fact, a study shows sleep can be interrupted in direct correlation with how much time you spend with your screen, meaning that 15 minutes of screen time might mean four minutes of less sleep, and so on.

Additionally, if you’re still in your teens or early twenties, your brain is still developing. Research shows your prefrontal cortex – the area in charge of higher reasoning – is still formulating up to age 25. Restorative sleep is vital in promoting a healthy brain, including cognitive function, hormone regulation, and metabolism. Lack of sleep can lead to obesity, depression, and other health issues. Turn off your screens – including your phones, iPads, laptops, desktop computer, and TV – two hours before you go to sleep to help your body understand that it’s time to shut down and get the restorative rest that you need.

Stress

College has its fun and joyful experiences and is a time to make new connections with your peers, and maybe even enjoy a social gathering or two. But there’s also a lot of stress – you may be living away from home for the first time, and there may be stress associated with living in close quarters with people you don’t really know well (and maybe aren’t compatible with). You may have been excited to start your college courses and have added on one too many classes. You may be changing your eating habits, exercise habits, and overall routine. All of it is a disruption, and it’s natural that you may face some disruption in your sleep as well.

A few tips can help you to manage the stress that can lead to sleep disruption. Take an honest look at your class schedule – you may be interested in that 300-level course in philosophy, but do you need to take it this semester? While your university experience is a time to explore different academic areas, work with your advisor to ensure you’re first getting the required courses in and not overloading yourself with classes, especially as you’re adjusting to college life. Make sure you have some healthy time just for you. Look into your college’s extracurricular offerings such as yoga and meditation classes for an extra way to relax– the time spent will pay off in better sleep and, therefore, a clearer mind.

Diet

It’s super easy to rely on pizza deliveries and junk food, especially when you’re stressed and short of time – but a poor diet, even for resilient young people, can actually increase your stress and therefore make it harder to sleep. While you may feel invincible in your twenties, a poor diet can have a long term impact on your health, including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. Think of it like starting a savings account – you may not have much in there to begin with, but it all adds up the older you get.

Take advantage of your college’s meal plan. Hit the salad bar and take advantage of the healthier offerings like vegetables, whole grain offerings, and fresh fruit. Or, if you’re on your own for meals and short of time, grab the pre-made salads and healthy meals from the grocery store. Additionally, stay away from the Red Bull and caffeine-boosters, to pull those all-nighters (which are terrible sleep interrupters anyway). And while you may have plenty of opportunities to socialize after hours, lay off the alcohol, which despite being a depressant, can actually cause you to lose quality sleep.

Remember, your college also may have free opportunities to see a counselor if your insomnia, stress, or alcohol use become problematic. Remember that you’ve made a major life change by starting your college career, and seeking additional help to adjust may be just the extra hand you need to sleep easier.

Student Life Uncategorized

The Best Jobs to Have While You’re in College

May 12, 2020

College is an exciting time of learning, growing, and experiencing your first taste of the “real world”. Unfortunately, a four-year public college can cost over $28,000 each year and a private institution averages over $32,000 a year. 

So, while your studies should be your top priority while you’re in school, it’s not uncommon for many college students to look for some type of employment to start paying off student loan debt, to open a savings account, or just to have some spending money and freedom. 

It’s been reported that about 40% of undergraduates work at least 30 hours a week while in college. That can burn you out quickly if you’re not careful. So, what are some of the best jobs for students, and how can you start preparing now for your future career? 

Finding a Part-Time Job

There are plenty of part-time job opportunities that won’t force you to take too much time away from your studies. Some of the highest-paying jobs are actually more “gig-based” like nannying/babysitting, dog walking, or tutoring. You can choose to take on these jobs as it works for your schedule, which means you won’t have to miss something important in school in order to work. 

If you want a more structured, hourly position that ensures a certain amount of pay each week, some of the best options for college students include the following: 

  • Bank teller
  • Barista
  • Cashier
  • Bookkeeper
  • Warehouse worker
  • Medical receptionist

There are even some temporary job opportunities if you’re having a slow semester or you need some extra cash. The U.S. Postal Service, for example, hires “casual workers” twice a year for 90 days during peak mail periods. 

Use different resources for finding a job including LinkedIn, your local newspapers, and job sites like Monster.com. You might think there aren’t any active part-time opportunities available, but they’re out there if you’re diligent in your search! You can even check out flyers or advertisements posted around campus for companies that might be hiring and looking specifically for college students. 

Starting Your Own Business

Do you want to bring in some money but you don’t want to work for someone else? College can be a great time to start your own business. Many college students who have skills in things like graphic design or writing take on freelance jobs. It’s a great way to make money on a per-gig basis, and it can also help to boost your resume and build your career while you’re still in school if you provide consistent work to reputable clients. 

The more you network and build your client base, the easier it will be for you to grow your business. You can even start a service-based business in your collegiate town, such as a cleaning company, a pet-sitting business, or landscaping. 

If you get enough regular clients, that can lead to positive marketing opportunities and people sharing strong reviews. When you graduate, you’ll already have established a strong business, and you may be able to expand it to different locations. 

Kickstarting Your Career

Most people go to college to learn more about the career path they have chosen, but there’s no rule that says you can’t kickstart that career in college. If you know what your passion is, you can make the transition to life after college easier on yourself by having a career-focused mind now. 

One great way to do that is to sign up for an internship. Internships allow you to work for whatever industry you’re interested in and get hands-on, real-world experience that you simply can’t get in a classroom. For example, if you want to go into the marketing field or work in developing content marketing strategies for companies, interning at a content marketing agency can help you to hone in on skills like social media, analytics/data, personalized content, and design, which you can use to boost your resume and land a job faster after you graduate. 

Internships are also a great way to make connections and network with people already in the business world. College grads often make the mistake of presenting themselves only online when they’re looking for jobs instead of going out into the world and networking with people. While searching for jobs online has its place, there’s nothing like face-to-face interaction for someone to think positively of you and to connect you with the right people. 

If you’re knee-deep in your studies but you also want to start making money, you have several options depending on how much you want to work. Whether you decide to be your own boss, work a part-time job, or intern somewhere that may clear a path for a brighter future, making money while you’re still in college can end up saving you a lot of extra financial stress once you graduate.

Student Life Uncategorized

Benefits of Extracurricular Activities for College Students

April 29, 2020

With the increasing pressure of getting good grades and the overall task of completing academics, ever wonder why our schools and parents prioritize extracurricular activities so much?

According to the US Census Bureau, a survey of school-aged children showed that 42% of these children were involved in sports, 30% were engaged in lessons, 28% were involved in clubs and a significant 9% of an over-enthusiastic bunch was involved in all three of these extracurricular activities.

These figures highlight and answer our question as to why extracurriculars are so essential apart from academics.

5 Essential Reasons Why Extracurricular Activities Are Great

However, here are five amazing reasons why extracurricular activities are totally worth your time and energy if you are still confused about investing in your academic resources.

  1. Exploring hobbies, passions, and interests

Extracurricular activities are separate from your academics. It is why you have the power to choose whatever you are passionate about. You can explore your interests and hobbies like art, pottery, gardening, and any other activity. You are not bound like in academics to study and pass your exam with flying colors. Your motives are purely driven by passion. You succeed and thrive to do it because you choose to and you might even find a newer interest that you can take up as your career in the future.

  1. Contributing to higher self-esteem

Acing studies is really tremendous, but doing well in extracurricular is an automatic self-esteem booster. Choosing what you love to do because you do it well is different. But doing something well because love to do it and you were passionate about is a groundbreaker. Not only will it help you get higher self-esteem and self-satisfaction, but it is a highly motivating, contributing factor to having a better life ahead.

  1. Better opportunities for socializing

Extracurricular activities are a great way to socialize and make new friends. Not only do you get to have a social circle, but those friends share your interests with you too. You get to talk about your interests, share thoughts, and create a community based on what you all do best and create a connection over your mutual passion.

  1. Fun apart from studies

As mentioned earlier, extracurricular activities are fun apart from studies. It is a healthy and constructive way of spending time doing something you like and are actually passionate about. It helps you take time out for yourself whenever you are stressed about studies and other responsibilities of your life.

  1. A valuable addition to your resume

Extracurricular activities add value to your resume. Nowadays, transferable skills that are learned from your outside hobbies and passions can be more relevant than academic achievements, not to mention making you stand out from the crowd of applications they have. Adding any kind of additional activities can only help you when it comes to your resume.

All in all, extracurricular activities are fun and engaging! Remember, when posed with the idea of being able to integrate hobbies and passions with real life, you should always take the opportunity and remember these 5 things, but don’t forget to put your academics first.

Bio: Claudia Jeffrey is currently working as a Content Strategist at Crowd Writer and Premium Jackets, excellent platform for dissertation editing service UK. She herself is heavily involved in sports and was an active participant in other extracurricular activities during her high school years. You can read her blogs at WordCountJet as well.

Health Uncategorized

How More Music, Theater, and Dance Boosts Students’ Writing Scores: Top Secret Tricks

April 17, 2020

Writing assignments are an inevitable part of education, but they prove to be too stressful for many students. Multiple factors influence the writing scores including stress levels, understanding of the subject, creativity, the level of critical thinking, among other things. If you are looking to improve writing scores then music, theater, and dance could help you out. How? Let’s see.

Visible results

Students measure their results and success by things they see and although this seems obvious, writing doesn’t provide that. How? Writing assignments involve developing an argument or composing a paper on a given subject. Then, the student submits the paper to the teacher and waits for the results. For students who struggle with writing it can be difficult to assess their success and the level of progression until they get the score. Dancing, singing, and performing arts are different. The student can immediately see how well she or he is doing. How does this translate to writing you wonder? Well, doing well in performing arts gives confidence boost they need to express their thoughts, opinions, and emotions in the paper and develop or improve writing skills. 

Self-evaluation 

Performance of any kind calls for a great deal of self-evaluation. Whether it’s music, dance, theater, or something else the student will always assess the strengths and weaknesses looking for something to improve. The habit of self-evaluation can also serve in the improvement of writing scores. It teaches a student to take a look at the paper from a different angle and identify parts where improvement is necessary. Habits developed with performing arts can easily apply to the writing skills and their development and better scores ensue. 

Stress relief through conquered challenges

One of the biggest advantages of theater, dance, and music is their ability to manage stress and anxiety. Academic life is stressful and, as you already know, stress harms overall performance. When engaging in performing arts students learn how to manage and relieve stress levels which can help them feel calmer when writing and composing their assignments.

Enhanced cognitive abilities

Performing arts such as music lessons, dancing, theater, and others can boost cognitive skills in students. For example, studies show that music lessons can enhance language-based reasoning, short-term memory, planning, and inhibition in students. Stronger cognitive function improves how students express themselves, sharpens critical thinking, and makes them overall more creative. All these factors are necessary for great writing scores. 

Conquering fear

Students tend to worry a lot about their teacher’s reaction to the paper. They are scared to express themselves out of fear it might lead to negative remarks. However, writing scores don’t work that way. Engaging in dancing, music, or joining drama group helps students conquer the fear and focus on themselves and their performance only. You learn how to be the best you can be without constantly thinking about someone else’s reactions. The freedom you experience when performing arts can help you conquer fears in writing assignments as well. 

Better writing scores is what most students want, but aren’t sure how to achieve it. The answer is simple; join a drama group, sing, play an instrument, and perform arts in some other way. Confidence boost, stress management, enhanced cognitive functions are some of many reasons why performing arts can help improve writing skills and contribute to better scores. They teach us how to feel free to express ourselves and evaluate the performance to keep doing better and better each time.

BIO: Kathrin Garner is an enthusiastic journalist and writes articles on social issues. As an activist, she takes part in the FV KASA program, which is a discussion platform on relevant cannabis topics. She searches for current issues and writes about it to a wide range of readers.