Browsing Tag

college student success

Career Uncategorized

4 Modern HR Tools Recruiters Are Using That Every Applicant Should Know About

April 10, 2020

As you begin your career search, preparing your resume, preparing for interviews, and choosing your professional attire will likely be the most important things on your mind. However, with new technology emerging in the human resources industry, a new set of requirements and preparations could arise for job applicants. Being prepared for what these changes may mean for you could help you land the job you want.

Here are five of the modern HR tools that recruiters are using nowadays that every applicant should know: 

Social Media

Social media is becoming a popular means of recruitment for companies of all sizes. There are a variety of ways in which a recruiter can benefit from using social media, such as:

  • Advertising open positions
  • Sourcing candidates
  • Highlighting company culture
  • Screening candidates 

You must use caution when posting online. Not only are companies looking to see what you are talking about or what you may be like, but they are often looking for any red flags that may stick out on your social profiles. A company could end up deciding not to hire a candidate solely based on something they found online

Talent Management Software

When considering the large number of applications that employers usually receive for any given position, they need to have a central processing system that can handle large sets of data. 

By using talent management software to process candidates appropriately, candidates are kept up to date with any hiring decisions as they’re made. This software also provides applicants with an easily accessible hub for gathering information and completing files in the hiring process. Once an applicant is hired, this software can be used for the entirety of the onboarding process and even throughout their tenure at the company. 

Resume Screening Tools

A resume screening tool automatically processes your resume to see if it is a potential match for the job description based on keywords the employer has chosen to screen for. Applicants with the best matches are then put into a smaller pool to be reviewed by the recruiter. Resumes that do not match the criteria, whether they are a fit or not, usually do not receive a second look. 

For employers, this can help limit the often-large selection of applications they receive, but for qualified candidates, it could cause them to miss out on seemingly perfect opportunities. Because of this, it’s important to tailor your resume for each position

Automated Background and Reference Checks

As automation technology continues to advance, more companies are finding ways to use it to increase efficiency across their business. In recruitment, this can be especially beneficial for running background checks and contacting references.  

Businesses can use this technology to automatically scan any registered databases and verified systems to see if your name appears alongside anything worrisome, such as criminal records or false social security numbers. 

For your references, automation ensures a smooth communicative process so the business can send them pre-populated questions they can answer and send back quickly. This can help prevent candidates from being held up in this portion of the hiring process. 

Video Conferencing for Interviews

In the modern world, work situations are becoming unique to each employee. With the introduction of video conferencing tools for interviewing purposes, more applicants can apply to positions of interest to them, no matter their location. 

This can be extremely beneficial for you as an applicant if you live in a different location than the position you are applying for and are looking to relocate or work remotely.

Because technology in recruiting has increased significantly over time, you must consider how prospective employers will view your application and interview. Enlist the help of professionals to ensure your application has the potential to stand out at the top of any employer’s list.

Student Life Uncategorized

Are You a College Student? It’s Time to Control Your Finances

April 2, 2020

Getting an education is one of the best things you can do for your financial future. However, it’s just part of the success equation and it’s easy to make financial decisions that complicate things. It’s best to take control of your finances as early as possible and it’s never too early. The tips below can help any college student take charge of their finances.

Establish a Savings Account

Saving money is something that some college students don’t think about because there’s usually a limited amount of money available. Even if that’s the case, it’s best to set aside a small amount of money to serve as an emergency fund. Things happen and you don’t want to end up in a financial bind without a solution.

Avoid Debt When Possible

The biggest debt that most college students incur is student loans. That’s because college is expensive and sometimes it’s hard to pay for tuition and the cost of living without a loan. If there is ever a way to avoid getting a student loan or any other debt, you should definitely steer clear. Some people struggle for a lifetime to pay off student loan debt. If you decide to get a loan, make sure you do so wisely by consulting with a financial aid advisor.

Monitor Your Spending

A simple financial rule that should always be followed is to spend less money than you make. It’s easier to spend more money than you actually earn by using credit cards. This is rarely a good idea and it’s usually something that people end up regretting for many years.

Limit Credit Card Use

Credit cards are surprisingly easy to get when you’re a college student, which can be unfortunate because you’re still learning about finances. Sometimes what happens is the credit cards are maxed out and not paid on time. As a result, a good number of college students end up having to repair their credit later. If you end up getting a credit card, make sure you get one with a low interest rate and pay off the balance monthly.

Stick with a Budget

Having a budget is far more important than you may realize. That’s because knowing how much money you have to spend and sticking with your commitment not to exceed your budget can help you achieve your financial goals. If you need to earn more money, consider a side gig like Uber if you have a vehicle. You’ll be considered a contractor and you can work whenever you want. Instead of receiving Form W2, Uber will use a 1099 generator and send you the information by email or regular mail.

Start Investing

If you’re working a full-time job and they provide a retirement account, make sure you take full advantage of that benefit. It’s easy to think you have plenty of time to invest in a retirement account, but that time will go by quickly. By starting at a young age, you’re more likely to achieve your retirement goals.

Maintain Insurance

Health and disability insurance are two types of insurance that most people should have. If you don’t know whether or not you have these insurance plans, check with your employer. If you don’t have them, it’s time to get them. Not having insurance is something that can have devastating consequences when it comes to your finances.

Being a college student doesn’t mean you don’t have to be diligent about your finances and the financial decisions you make now will impact your future. Since you will probably have a learning curve like most people, it’s best to read as much as possible about personal finances. You’ll be glad you did.

BIO:Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Student Life Uncategorized

Where to Store Your Stuff

March 27, 2020

As finals approach, each hour is precious for those college students who will be going home for the summer. Some of them could simply pack their suitcases and drive home, but others might have an apartment or a dorm room full of furnishings. Being able to retain their belongings without making it into yet another hassle can take time and planning, and it can cut into valuable study time. Here are a few suggestions that might help ease the mind and leave plenty of time for study.

Start Winnowing Possessions

When the last semester begins, it is time to start winnowing possessions into what should be kept and what should not. For those who have a dorm room with mostly clothes and personal belongings, it can be a simple matter to decide what they really want to keep. Others will find they have to start making choices about items of furniture that really matter, and they need to consider what can be easily replaced.

Consider the Next Semester

Living in a dorm room is relatively easy when it comes to limiting possessions, but those who want to continue living off-campus will need to consider the next semester. If they will be renting another apartment, furniture will likely be important. Even a partially furnished apartment has room for a few items any student might find necessary, so making decisions now about the next semester should figure into what to keep and what to give away or toss out.

Taking It Home

Parents are a good resource for college students, and many return home for the summer months. Their family is often ready to welcome them with open arms, but it might become an issue when moving back home. Being able to pack and load everything into a moving van will be the easy part, but is there enough storage in the basement or attic to accommodate everything is something that should be considered. Taking it home might sound great, but it is only good if there is enough storage room available.

Packing Up

Whether it will take only a few suitcases or a moving van, packing up is part of the process. For those who will be able to easily move, labels and lists are not necessary. Those storing their possessions at home or in a facility over the summer will need to make sure they pack their items in good boxes and label them. Even furnishings should be wrapped during the move, and it should remain on them until they are secure in the new dorm room or apartment.

Using a Storage Facility

It might not be feasible to take everything home, but students who wish to keep their possessions could consider using a storage facility. It might also be less expensive to rent a unit for a few months than packing everything up and bringing it home. There are plenty of good options available, and small units can be very affordable. Making sure to use all the available space in a small unit can keep the cost low, and it will avoid the need for renting a vehicle to move a long distance. For those who were considering the time it takes to load and unload, it could be just as easily done while moving into a storage unit than moving it all home.

Shop Around

The cost of storage can vary even within a small geographical area, so it is important to shop around for the best deal. Some facilities offer discounts for students, and others have rental specials at certain times of the year. Most of the information can be found online, and even taking the time to call and ask about multiple rentals for several students might garner a discount or two.

Student Deals

The need for summer storage has long been an issue, and there are a few colleges offering students help in this area. Contact the Student Union on campus for possible assistance, and ask them if they have a discount deal with any local storage facilities. For those seeking more options, there are some storage facilities that cater to students such as SMARTBOX.

Whether you decide to pack everything up and take it home or leave it in a storage unit, remember that GradGuard offers worldwide personal property coverage as an automatic added endorsement with their renters policies! Be sure to have your items protected whether they are traveling home for the summer or locked up in a storage box.

Career Uncategorized

3 Tips to Help New Students Decide Their Major

March 16, 2020

You’ve just arrived at college. Between the endless activities, free time and paths to choose for yourself, you are immediately bombarded with a plethora of choices to make. How do your study habits change? How do you make sure you get along with your roommate? How will you make friends? However, the most important one is a choice that centers on your education: your major. There can be a ton of pressure when choosing a major from friends and family, not to mention your own dreams of what field you’d like to work in after graduation. Here are three tips for helping new students decide their major. 

Consider Your Skills

When choosing a major, it’s easy to default right away to what you think will end up making you the most money. Everyone has occasional dreams of financial grandeur, and tying that into your decision of what to major in seems like a reasonable choice. However, make sure that when picking your major, you consider where your main skills and interests are. If you don’t have the passion for accounting but are a magnificent writer, think about how perfecting your writing to an elite level via an English major could pay off for you in the long run, versus merely being an average accountant. Sometimes, the “smart” choice in choosing a major isn’t necessarily the one that traditionally would earn you the most money. It’s the one where you can excel and perform at a high level. 

Think About After Graduation

When choosing a major, you’ll obviously want to keep what exactly it is that you want to do after graduation in the front of your mind. If you want to go right into the business world, a major that gives you a solid business background would be preferred. If you’re thinking about taking a gap year and then going to graduate school, a major that you think would help you perform well in your post-secondary education would be a smart move. While you certainly don’t have to be sure of what you want to do after graduation, you can think about a general field you wouldn’t mind having a job in and see if your education can inspire greater interest in the topic. 

Don’t Rush It

When you arrive at school, it may seem like you have to decide on a major as quickly as possible so you can start classes and tell friends and family about the direction you have. But don’t make the mistake of declaring a major just for the sake of declaring a major. Take your time to work through the different possibilities of what you could specialize in your head before making the decision. The last thing you want is to regret rushing to declare a major in a year when you’re in the thick of classes and it’s too late to switch. Think through what you really want out of your college experience, and then use that to guide your choice.

Choosing a college major is a high-pressure situation. However, if you consider what your skills are, think about what you want to do after graduation and don’t rush into making the choice, you can be sure that you’re making a choice that you can be confident in. Once you pick your major, you’ll be free to dive into your studies and enjoy all that the college experience has to offer.

Health Uncategorized

Online Games to Play with Your Friends

March 16, 2020

In the midst of recent events, many college students are advised to stay inside and keep to themselves. Now, this can be great for introverts who have been waiting for this kind of thing to be socially acceptable their whole lives, but for those who will start to miss human interaction, here are a few games you can play online with your friends to pass the time!

Crash Team Racing

One of the best on the market, obviously. A revamp from the late 90’s, this is a great racing game to play with a friend or seven.

Dead By Daylight

If you are interested in survival games with a strategic twist, go for this one! You can get it on Steam, Nintendo Switch, and just about anything else! Play with 3-4 extra other friends for the best experience. Though this one is not for the faint of heart. You’ll see what I mean.

World of Warcraft

I know, I know. This can be a trigger for some, but this is a great one to play with a friend or two, PLUS it takes a long time. It can be easy to get sucked into the world of Orcs and magic, so give it a shot! Best played on Steam.

League of Legends

Let’s ignore the salt factor of the community and focus on the fact that it is a fun MOBA (multiplayer online battle arena) game to play with up to 9 other friends! If you get that many you are able to start a party and play against each other. It’s a PC game that is usually downloaded from their website.

Super Smash Bros

This one doesn’t even need a description. Use it to get all that anger and frustration out! Mainly played on Nintendo systems.

Fortnite

Another survival meets combat game that most of us know about. I know that things can be a little iffy when it comes to these well-known games (you either love them or you hate them), but take this time to try out something you might not usually go for!

Man of Medan

Not much should be said about this one because it’s more fun to work and play on your own. It’s a game that is solely based on the idea of the butterfly effect and you choose the direction your characters go down. It can be played with up to 4 friends.

You can also go for classic games like Call of Duty, Halo, and Left4Dead as they are always options to play with your friends. Regardless of the game you choose, be sure you get Discord and a good headset to chat with your friends on! You can even use it just to talk to each other instead of just doing the regular group text.

There you have it. Staying inside and keeping healthy is key over the next few weeks, but it doesn’t mean you have to eliminate communication with people! Try out some of these online games to play with your college friends and stay safe.

Health Uncategorized

The Doctor is Out: Non-Medical Career Paths in Healthcare

March 9, 2020

Maybe you’ve always thought about a career in medicine, but blood isn’t really your thing. Or maybe you’ve actually embarked on a career as a healthcare provider, but the road is long, and you’ve got to make ends meet while you chase your dreams. The good news is you have a lot of options for pursuing a career in the healthcare industry outside of the practice of medicine itself.

Think About What You Want

As you explore your options in the healthcare industry, you’ll want to consider not only what kind of work you want to do, but also what you need from your job. Before you accept a job, you need to ensure they offer a benefits package that serves you today as well as tomorrow, especially if you’re considering staying for the long haul. Ensuring that your prospective employers offer benefits, such as retirement and medical, dental, and vision insurance, can help protect you now and well into the future.

The Good Enough Job

If you’re not yet ready to settle into your forever job, you can still find great ways to make a solid living while you work toward your ultimate career goals. For example, if you’re a medical student looking to earn some income and garner some experience in the healthcare industry, there are a lot of great sites you can turn to. Major job boards like Indeed and Monster can help you tailor your job search to your particular requirements, while other sites like College Recruiter are dedicated specifically to helping undergraduate and graduate students connect with prospective employers.

Turning a Job into a Career

If you’re ready to start your career now instead of waiting on that advanced degree or those years of clinical training, you don’t have to abandon the healthcare industry to do it. There are endless options for stable, well-paying, and richly rewarding jobs in the healthcare industry. For instance, if computers, as well as healthcare, are at the top of your interests, then why not combine them by pursuing a career in Big Data and healthcare AI?

Or you may want to be a bit more hands-on while sparing yourself the rigors of med school. Studies show that careers in home health are among the most in-demand and fastest-growing in the US. Or, if you’re ready to commit yourself to a bit more time in school, you can build an exciting and very lucrative career with a Masters’s degree in health law and policy!

The Takeaway

Even if you feel a career in medicine isn’t for you, that doesn’t mean you have to abandon your interest in the healthcare field. Whether you’re looking for a temporary job in the industry to make ends meet while you cultivate vital professional experience, or you’re hoping to launch your professional career, your options are virtually endless. The healthcare industry has something in it for just about everyone, from health AI and Big Data to home healthcare to health law. So do a little exploring to find the career path that’s tailor-made for you!

Transition Uncategorized

What You Need to Know About Applying for College

February 28, 2020

After 12 years of general education, the time has come to join the big leagues. No matter what degree you’re aiming for, going to college can be exciting and frightening at the same. It all starts with you trying to find a reputable college.

If this is your first time applying to college, you might be feeling a little nervous and confused. However, it doesn’t have to be this way. Your college experience should always be an exciting experience.

Here’s what you need to know about applying for college.

Research Early On

You don’t have to wait until you graduate high school to look for a college. In fact, it’s recommended that you search during your time in high school. You should spend a majority of your junior year in high school looking for colleges.

Your senior year should primarily focus on learning the admission process. The admission process can vary, so it’s important to research each college and its requirements. This is where college admissions counseling comes in. They’ll help you set up everything and guide you through the process.

Determine Whether You Should Take the SAT or ACT

Once you’ve figured out what college you want to attend, the next thing you need to consider is what test to take. You can either take the SAT or the ACT. Both of these tests are used as an entryway into most colleges and go over the same subjects. The only real difference is how they’re scored. SATs are scored using a scale between 600 to 2400 while the ACTs measure scores by using 1 to 36.

In general, it doesn’t really matter which test is taken as most colleges take both of them. It’s just that some students do better with the SATs than the ACTs and vice versa. It is possible to take both of them. In fact, taking both of these tests can increase the likelihood of you getting accepted.

Be Ready to Face Rejection

If you get rejected by your college, don’t get discouraged. You can always apply again. But don’t sit around waiting for one college to accept you. Just because one college gave you a rejection doesn’t mean all of them will.

Sure, it may be a little heartbreaking to know that after all of the hard work you’ve done, all you received was a rejection letter. However, even the best of the best get rejections too. They could have the perfect grades and credentials, but the college rejected them anyway.

Applying to college is an exciting process, but it can also be very difficult. So, it’s important that you start off on the right foot. These tips aim to help you achieve just that.

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Career Uncategorized

Tips for Students Looking for Jobs

February 21, 2020

Looking for a job as a student can be a challenge since you’ll need to balance your job-hunting time with your focus on your schoolwork. Plus, if you’re about to graduate, you might not have the real-world work experience that many positions require. By adjusting your job hunting and application approach, you can increase your chances of quickly getting a job that you’ll enjoy. 

Be Flexible in Your Requirements

You might have an idea of your dream job in your head, but if you’re graduating or just need to bring in money, you might need to put that dream job on hold for a bit. If you don’t yet have any professional work experience, it can be hard to get a position when you’re competing against applicants with relevant experience and training. 

Instead, be flexible about the positions that you’re looking for, and look for jobs that don’t require you to have experience. These types of positions may include working in a coffee shop, in a retail store, for a landscaping company, or at a movie theater. Remember, you won’t have to stay in these positions forever, and they can serve as stepping stones, giving you the experience and skills that will help you to later get those more competitive jobs that require experience.

Use All of Your Resources

When finding a job as an early college graduate, it’s important to make the most of the job search resources available to you. In addition to using the job search boards, like Indeed, that everyone has access to, you have access to a very valuable resource: Your college’s career services department. This department may be able to help you find job opportunities that aren’t widely advertised to the general public, cutting out some of the competition. 

Most career services also offer many other valuable services. You may be able to have your resume and cover letter reviewed and edited, and the department might hold workshops to teach you valuable career skills, like how to prepare for your first professional job interview. Many career services offices also allow alumni to come back for future support, so even if you’ve already graduated, look into how this important resource might help you.  

Make Yourself Stand Out

When you apply for a job, you’ll probably be competing against many applicants, so you’ll need to find ways to make yourself stand out. For instance, there are many ways to get noticed on LinkedIn, such as by writing a summary that’s focused on what employers want to hear, and by incorporating keywords into your profile so that search engines (and recruiters) can find you. 

Don’t forget to incorporate these strategies into your cover letter and resume, too, since many employers now use technology to scan applications and identify those that include keywords indicating appropriate experience for the position. This strategy might make the difference in having a hiring manager look at your application, versus it ending up in the trash. 

Consider Starting a Business

If you’re graduating and looking for a way to financially support yourself, a job doesn’t have to be your only option. If you’re talented, ambitious, and driven to succeed, then you may be able to start your own business and work for yourself. 

Before you start a business, carefully think about what you enjoy doing and how you’re talented, then look for ways to monetize those talents. Be prepared to work hard and invest in your business, but remember that if you can build it into something successful, you won’t have to worry about applying for jobs. 

Even if your business fails, you’ll have learned valuable lessons and gained experience that can help you if you do decide to apply for jobs in the future.

There are so many opportunities when it comes to job searching. As long as you keep these tips in mind, you will be employed in no time! Happy Hunting!

BIO: Dan Matthews is a writer with a degree in English from Boise State University. He has extensive experience writing online at the intersection of business, finance, marketing, and culture.

Career Uncategorized

The World is My Classroom: Strategies for Online Learning Success

February 11, 2020

Learning never ends. It may be an old saying, but it’s one that’s taking on new resonance in today’s technological age. We now have more information at our fingertips than ever before in human history. Whether you are 20, 40, 60, or older, if you want to keep up and remain professionally relevant and cognitively sharp, you have to continually refine your existing skills and work to develop new ones.

That may sound intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. The great news is that today’s technology makes it easier than ever to advance your education or pursue new professional certifications no matter where you are or how busy you may be. There are online courses and academic programs, for example, at most every level, from basic skills to Ph.D. and Ed.D.

However, before you decide to enroll in an online course, it’s important to remember that e-learning is every bit as rigorous as a traditional, on-campus study. In fact, the time commitment may be even greater because you don’t have the benefit of attending a physical class to prove your participation. If you’re self-motivated and ready to commit, though, online courses can be the ideal solution, especially for busy working adults with families. However, to thrive in online courses, you need a bit of strategy.

Make It Work

If you’re considering taking online courses, there are a few study habits you need to embrace to get the most out of your learning experience and save yourself a lot of stress. Here are some highlights:

  • Get your tech in order: There is nothing worse than enrolling in an online course, only to find you don’t have the kind of equipment you need to use all functions of the online course effectively. While many online learning management systems (LMS) will enable you to access all course features from a cell phone or tablet, that’s not always the case, so make sure that your tech is compatible with your online course.
  • Check your access: You can’t very well be successful in an online course if you don’t have reliable internet access, so make sure you always have a Plan B, such as access to a local Wi-Fi hot spot should your internet go out. Many libraries, coffee shops, and fast-food restaurants provide free Wi-Fi but are careful about the security of the network. Have a reliable and efficient way to send and receive documents and other files without losing the formatting you need. Various kinds of PDF converters are available online to make sharing well-formatted documents a breeze.
  • Study every day: When you are taking an online course, it can be easy to put off until tomorrow what you need to be doing today. After all, you don’t have regular class meetings and your teacher’s appraising stare to keep you on schedule. In an online course, though, the work can mount up very, very quickly. To manage an online class without becoming overwhelmed, it’s better to study a bit every day than to try to cram it all in a once or twice week panicked study session.
  • Do NOT isolate: One of the most dispiriting and detrimental things an online student can do is isolate. It can be easy to feel lonely when you are taking online courses but remember you are NOT alone. There is an entire classroom full of students on the other side of the computer screen, not to mention your professor and advisors. Reach out to them early and often. That is why they’re there!

Learning should always be constant and consistent. So whether you are wanting to get a new degree, or simply trying to learn a new language through an online course; as long as you follow these tips from GradGuard, you will definitely be set up for success.

Transition Uncategorized

5 Tips For Succeeding In College As A Veteran

February 10, 2020

Current and newly transitioning service members who assume control of their college careers may initially find it a challenge. When you’re accustomed to following a regimented schedule, it can be tough managing study sessions, test preparation, assignments and interaction with new peers. Yet, the discipline and training that you’ve honed during your service — such as time management, attentiveness, and organization — can give you an edge in succeeding as a student.

As a veteran, you’re also empowered in a unique way. You have a singular worldview as a result of your experience and access to benefits that other students aren’t eligible for, such as the GI Bill. If you’re ready to pursue your degree, here are five tips for succeeding in college as a veteran.

1. Develop a Plan

Planning is key when preparing for military operations, and taking the next steps in your education is no different. Prospective students should contact their schools of choice for academic advising. An advisor can help answer questions about a particular area of study or degree plan. This ensures that you take the proper subjects in order to earn your degree. To be a successful student, consult with your professors and advisors about your course options before registering for classes.

2. Connect With a Veteran’s Administrator About Your Benefits

If you’ve been on active duty for at least two years, you’re entitled to certain benefits through the GI Bill. The bill provides students with a direct monthly payment they can use to cover fees, tuition, books, and other costs. Be sure to find the veteran’s office on campus, where you can connect with an administrator to discuss your unique situation. A veteran’s administrator can guide you through the process of claiming your benefits and the various documents you need to complete.

3. Create a Network

College is the ideal place to begin building a network of peers and future professionals. These connections, made both in and out of the classroom, can help you with your career trajectory. Networking is also a great way to find mentors who can provide valuable advice for your goals and point you in the right academic direction. A mentor could also help reduce culture shock, open the door to new opportunities and introduce you to new people.

4. Utilize Military-Specific Student Groups

Connecting with a military community on campus can help new veterans relate to the challenges of transitioning into college and civilian life. Many institutions of higher learning offer veteran-specific orientations, classes and organizations, which can serve as a support system and source of comfort. Bonding with peers from similar backgrounds can also make a veteran student’s academic career more rewarding.

5. Get Involved

While a strong support network is important, don’t let your military group be the only individuals you interact with on campus. Daily contact with new people from various backgrounds can help enrich your experience. Getting involved in organizations such as sports leagues, honor societies, fraternities or sororities and civic or cultural groups is a great way to meet new people, discover your passions and unwind from the stresses of school.

College doesn’t have to be an unfamiliar, foreign ordeal after your time in the military. Today’s universities offer veterans convenient ways to gain the education they desire. By taking the right steps and utilizing the resources available, a veteran can successfully transition into life as a student.

Bio: Jeremy Silverstein is Vice President of Operations and Vehicle Dispatching at Veteran Car Donations. During the years he’s been with the organization, he has become quite an expert in the industry and has handled tens of thousands of donated vehicles.