Browsing Tag

college classes

Career Other

The World is My Classroom: Strategies for Online Learning Success

February 11, 2020

Learning never ends. It may be an old saying, but it’s one that’s taking on new resonance in today’s technological age. We now have more information at our fingertips than ever before in human history. Whether you are 20, 40, 60, or older, if you want to keep up and remain professionally relevant and cognitively sharp, you have to continually refine your existing skills and work to develop new ones.

That may sound intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. The great news is that today’s technology makes it easier than ever to advance your education or pursue new professional certifications no matter where you are or how busy you may be. There are online courses and academic programs, for example, at most every level, from basic skills to Ph.D. and Ed.D.

However, before you decide to enroll in an online course, it’s important to remember that e-learning is every bit as rigorous as a traditional, on-campus study. In fact, the time commitment may be even greater because you don’t have the benefit of attending a physical class to prove your participation. If you’re self-motivated and ready to commit, though, online courses can be the ideal solution, especially for busy working adults with families. However, to thrive in online courses, you need a bit of strategy.

Make It Work

If you’re considering taking online courses, there are a few study habits you need to embrace to get the most out of your learning experience and save yourself a lot of stress. Here are some highlights:

  • Get your tech in order: There is nothing worse than enrolling in an online course, only to find you don’t have the kind of equipment you need to use all functions of the online course effectively. While many online learning management systems (LMS) will enable you to access all course features from a cell phone or tablet, that’s not always the case, so make sure that your tech is compatible with your online course.
  • Check your access: You can’t very well be successful in an online course if you don’t have reliable internet access, so make sure you always have a Plan B, such as access to a local Wi-Fi hot spot should your internet go out. Many libraries, coffee shops, and fast-food restaurants provide free Wi-Fi but are careful about the security of the network. Have a reliable and efficient way to send and receive documents and other files without losing the formatting you need. Various kinds of PDF converters are available online to make sharing well-formatted documents a breeze.
  • Study every day: When you are taking an online course, it can be easy to put off until tomorrow what you need to be doing today. After all, you don’t have regular class meetings and your teacher’s appraising stare to keep you on schedule. In an online course, though, the work can mount up very, very quickly. To manage an online class without becoming overwhelmed, it’s better to study a bit every day than to try to cram it all in a once or twice week panicked study session.
  • Do NOT isolate: One of the most dispiriting and detrimental things an online student can do is isolate. It can be easy to feel lonely when you are taking online courses but remember you are NOT alone. There is an entire classroom full of students on the other side of the computer screen, not to mention your professor and advisors. Reach out to them early and often. That is why they’re there!

Learning should always be constant and consistent. So whether you are wanting to get a new degree, or simply trying to learn a new language through an online course; as long as you follow these tips from GradGuard, you will definitely be set up for success.

Other Transition

Advice for Transfer Students: 5 Ways to Adapt to a New College

January 9, 2020
Happy

Depending on your outlook, transferring to a new college can be an exciting opportunity or an intimidating experience. From learning the campus to making new friends, transferring can be a challenge, but, we have some secrets that will make it a smoother adjustment. With these tips, it shouldn’t be hard at all.

If you’re a transfer student, here are five ways to adapt to your new college so you feel right at home!

1. Attend Orientation

The first thing you need to do is learn the layout of the campus, so make sure you attend your orientation! You’ll get a guided tour with current students who can answer any questions you have. It’s a great opportunity to learn about campus life, academics, and social activities.

Orientations are for new students only, so it’s also a chance to meet other students who are new to the school just like you!

2. Meet With Your Advisor

Schedule a meeting with your advisor as soon as possible. They will be able to tell you what classes you need to take, what credits transferred from your old school, and what you need to do to graduate on time.

College advisors are a great source of other information too. They can provide guidance on career paths and connect you with professors who specialize in your field. Advisors are there to help you succeed before and after graduation.

So don’t be shy! You can ask your college advisor questions regarding anything you want to know about your new school!

3. Get Involved in Campus Activities

Graduating on time should be your main focus, but you can’t study all the time. You also need to have some fun! Join clubs, teams, or other campus organizations that interest you. This is a great way to make new friends that are passionate about the same things as you.

Technically, classes are campus activities. So make it a point to get involved in class discussions as well. Being active in class is a good way to connect with other students and impress your professors at the same time.

Don’t assume that everyone on campus already knows each other. Especially if you’re on a big campus, most people won’t even know that you’re new. As long as you put yourself out there, you’ll make new friends in no time!

4. Attend Campus Events

Most colleges provide lots of free (or inexpensive) activities for students. So attend football, lacrosse, or basketball games. Check out performances from the campus theater group, orchestra, or jazz band. Go to art exhibitions or networking events for professional development. Head to a yoga class or sign up for a fitness course at the campus rec center.

These are just a few of the ways that you can expose yourself to new things and meet new friends in the process. Be sure to take advantage of every opportunity to do fun things with new people. You’re going to have a blast!

5. Live on Campus

If possible, live in an on-campus dorm. It will be much easier to assimilate into the campus culture if you eat, sleep, and hang out there. Plus, it’s the best way to get the full college experience.

It’s tempting to want to live in an off-campus apartment, but as a transfer student, you run the risk of isolating yourself, especially if you don’t know anyone at school. Living in a dorm will instantly put you amongst other students. As long as you make a point to introduce yourself and start conversations, you’ll quickly become a part of the scene. Some of these people just might become your new best friends!


If you want to make your transfer as easy as possible, start by attending orientation. Then, meet with your advisor to make sure you’re on the right track academically. Add a few clubs and organizations that interest you, start to take advantage of campus resources and events, and live on campus if you can. It will help you get the most out of your college experience.

With these tips and tricks in mind, it shouldn’t take long before your new school feels like home! 

Bio: Elaine Chavez is the Business Manager at 625 Broadway. With over 8 years of experience in the industry, she begins and ends each day loving what she does. She is passionate about helping people find the perfect place to call home and shines at building a community that everyone is proud to be a part of.

Other Student Life

Rate My Professor

December 6, 2019

One of the best pieces of advice often given to incoming college students is to “take professors, not classes.” Having good professors makes all the difference in college which is why Rate My Professor is an absolute must-use site.

RMP is a website that allows students to, well, rate their professors. Students rate professors and the difficulty of their class on a scale from 1-5. Students are also asked whether they would take the class again and are forced to leave a written review. This is an extremely useful tool when deciding which professors to take classes from and can make a huge difference in your college success. However, there are a few things you should keep in mind when using RMP. Here are five tips to help you use RMP to its full potential:

Number of Reviews

First, it is very important to keep in mind the sample size that a certain professor has on RMP. If a professor only has 10 reviews, then RMP might not be an extremely useful resource in this case. Pay attention to the number of reviews a professor has!

Consider the Rating

Students that leave reviews are typically on one extreme end of the spectrum: a vast majority of reviews on RMP are by students that either absolutely love or absolutely hate the professor. This means that a lot of professors have an overall ranking of around 3. This does not necessarily mean that they are a bad professor! When this is the case, you need to do a little deeper research.

Read the Reviews Carefully

Third, you must read the reviews that students leave. This is where you will find out if the professor favors homework or exams. You will learn whether his lectures are engaging or monotonous. Former students will tell you if attending class is necessary or if you can get by without going. Every student has a preferred style of learning, and it is important to choose professors that match your style.

Read Reviews for the Right Class

Pay attention to which class students leave reviews for. Every review will show which class the student took. Some professors are good at teaching one class and not so good at teaching other classes. This might mean that a professor has a relatively average overall rating while still excelling in one of the classes they teach. For example, an economics 110 professor can have great ratings from his Econ 110 students and less than average ratings from his 400 level students.

Leave a Review!

Make sure to pay it forward by leaving a rating on RMP after you take a class. RMP has helped all of us immensely, so it’s really the least we can do. Be honest in your review and write something that will be useful for future students considering your professor.

Choosing classes for the next semester can be a little daunting, but definitely be sure to use Rate My Professor to make that decision just a little easier.

Other Student Life

6 College Campus ‘Lifehacks’ that Often Slip Under the Radar

November 21, 2019

College can be an overwhelming experience. Class schedules, living in a dorm for four years, and generally setting up a life away from home can be an intimidating prospect. If you’re preparing for life on campus, here are some less-well-known tips to give you a leg up on the challenges.

1. Get the Right Cooking Gear

It’s common knowledge that cooking your own food can save money on campus, but who has time for that every day? Besides, you can’t install an oven in a dorm room. If you want to keep your food costs down, consider getting an Instant Pot or a slow cooker to help make mealtimes quick and easy.

2. Wield Your Student Loans Wisely

Student loans are for more than just classes and books. In fact, you can use them for pretty much any of life’s necessities. The keyword here is necessities. Entertainment and spring break trips don’t count. However, if you’re in a financial pinch, consider using your loans to cover:

  • Student housing
  • Meal plans
  • Groceries
  • Rent
  • Utilities
  • Transportation
  • Miscellaneous school fees

3. Record Lectures

Sometimes lectures are recorded for you. Other times, it’s not allowed at all. For every other situation, you may want to use your smartphone to record your professors, especially during classes with information you know you’ll want to reference in the future. This is an underutilized option that can be invaluable when it comes time to study later on. Many times questions on the test are pulled directly from a lecture, so listening to lectures during commutes or during study time allows you to be more freshly prepared than if you had just taken notes.

4. Take a Parking Stroll

It can be easy to buckle under the pressure to pay for that outrageously priced parking pass. However, you may be able to work around it. Take a preliminary stroll around campus and look for places where you may be able to cash in on some free parking. You may even get a little exercise out of the trek.

5. Don’t Limit Your Study Spots

Even if you’re a creature of habit, it’s good to take time to scout out a variety of ideal studying locations, like:

  • The campus library
  • A local community library
  • A coffee shop
  • Your dorm room
  • The student union
  • The great outdoors

If you have several different places available, you can tailor each study session depending on things like the weather, your mood, what you’re studying, and your study buddies.

6. Space Out Your Study Time

For students, cramming is common. So is burning the candle at both ends. In fact, unhealthy academic studying behaviors are stereotypical and too often praised by college students. Don’t fall victim to the hype. Make sure to space out your study time as much as possible. Your brain will thank you for the opportunity to rest in between sessions.

Surviving the College Experience

College is full of challenges. Just when you think you have everything figured out, you encounter a professor on a bad day, run into financial issues, or upend your schedule at the end of a semester. 

Arming yourself with lesser-known lifehacks like these can make a world of a difference as you try to go with the flow. They can help you keep your grades up, your professors happy, your finances in order, and your brain sane.

Bio:  Dan Matthews is a writer with a degree in English from Boise State University. He has extensive experience writing online at the intersection of business, finance, marketing, and culture.

Other Transition

4 Years, 8 Semesters, 120 Credit Hours

September 24, 2019

This task ahead of every full-time college student. For some, it will take longer and others shorter. This usually means that a student will have to take about 15 credit hours per semester. Some students take more.

Accommodating

Many college students have to work while they are in school and it can be a major challenge to manage a coursework load and an employee workload. Thankfully there are multiple solutions to manage 120 credit hours and 20-40 hr work week. Online classes and summer classes are just two of the options available to lighten the load allowing for students to achieve academic success while not having to be stressed out over the balance between working and completing school. 

Online Courses

Online classes are great ways to give students more control over managing their time. An online class does not have a set time that students have to attend a lecture. There are due dates for assignments and as long as the student is able to complete the assignments within the time that is due they are fine. Online classes allow students to work from wherever and whenever they want to. Some students will work on their academic material while they are at work. 

Summer Courses

Summer classes are extremely effective in allowing students to get more work done over the same amount of time. Just think, if you take two summer classes in between every spring and fall semester then you would only have to take 12 credits per semester instead of 15 and still graduate on time with 120 credits. Another great reason to take summer classes is that they keep the mind going. Students will be working hard during the school year and then after finals week of the spring semester, they will enter summer break mode. While it is nice to take a small break from schoolwork, a three-month-long break is not healthy for staying in the academic groove. Working out the mind is very similar to working out the body. If one does not continue to workout the mind it will become sluggish, making it difficult to start the next fall semester. But taking a couple summer classes allows students to continue exercising their mind but not to the point that it’s a burden. Keeping a small connection to academics during the offseason will make the transition back into the academic year a swift one. 

Navigating the course of college is not a simple task. It takes grit, determination and strategic planning. 4 years, 8 semesters, 120 credit hours. This can seem like a lot being thrown at you but there are plenty of ways to lighten the load and smoothen the path. Taking online courses and summer classes are just two ways to help simplify the college management process. Learn more about college tips, tricks, and hacks by visiting the GradGuard blog.

Other Student Life

How to Find Your Perfect Study Spot

August 15, 2019

As a college student, it is important to figure out how to effectively study. This is a crucial aspect of finding success in college. There are many options for places to study on and off-campus and it is helpful to figure out what works best for you. Here are some options to consider when looking for your perfect study spot:

The Library

This is a classic option for students who are seeking a quiet place to study. Your school’s library may contain different areas for those who prefer different levels of silence. The library may also have different resources such as tutoring and study rooms available to students. This is a great option for many students but is far from the only place on campus to study.

The Student Union

This is a great option for students who are looking for a more lively place to study. If you prefer more background noise this may be the place for you. If you go to your student union, there will most likely be many tables, chairs, and couches for you to study at. Your student union likely gets very busy, so you may have to figure out the best time for you to go. One downside to this study spot is that it may be distracting if you run into lots of people that you know and are easily caught up in conversation. 

Your Dorm Room

This spot can be a hit or miss depending on your situation. If you have a roommate this may not be the best option. It can also be an issue if you are studying on your bed and not a desk as you may be more prone to falling asleep. If you desire privacy when studying this may be a good choice. This may also be a good option on days when you are feeling sick or don’t have the energy to leave your dorm. 

A Local Coffee Shop

A coffee shop is a great choice for students who have a desire to study somewhere off-campus. Depending on your location, there may be many choices near campus. It can be fun to explore your area and hunt for the best local coffee shops. Many students find it helpful to go off campus to study in order to better concentrate and find motivation.

Outside

When the weather is nice, it could be a great change of pace to study amongst nature. Find some friends and scope out a nice patch of grass on campus or travel to a local park to soak up some sun. Be careful when studying outside because although it may be a good option for some it could be distracting for others. 

Throughout the semester, it could be helpful to try out different locations to figure out what works best for you before finals season begins. There are many options that extend beyond this list that may be available to you depending on your college. Have a fun time testing out different study spots and studying strategies

Check out GradGuard for more information on how to make the most out of your college experience and follow us on social media @gradguard to stay up to date on new information.

Health Other

The Impact of Technology on Education and Study Habits

June 4, 2019

Over time, technology has been evolving and has opened up a whole new world that didn’t exist a couple of years ago. Amazingly, the world has become a place where people can learn what has been hidden in books, through a virtual experience.  

Gone are days when students used to stress over exams, due to their lack of preparedness. Today, you can watch a step-by-step video and learn the toughest concepts easily through online tutorials.

From taking online classes with Clutch, an academic lifesaver, to studying for your organic chemistry exam, you can be sure to face your exams with confidence. Through this article, we will look at some of the biggest changes in the industry.

  • Being Entertained While Studying

Do you like the act of burying your head in books for hours? Do you even like the idea of looking at papers constantly without a break? The answer is probably no.

With content creators looking for ways to create engaging posts, academia posts are amazingly created with a twist of fun. Educational content is created with the learners’ needs in mind.

For example, you can learn about Los Angeles by watching YouTube videos about fun facts about LA or even listening to a lecture by a renowned travel expert. There is a whole new world of learning materials outside of books and Wikipedia.

  • Gamification of Learning

Isn’t it crazy that you can learn through gaming? The idea of gamification of lectures is strongly supported by educational experts.

This started way back with classroom Jeopardy for review sessions. The only difference is that now, as opposed to a classroom exercise, you will enjoy online games created purposely to teach and instruct.

Educational videos prove to boost student retention. There are also game apps used to improve studying with puzzles, logic and general intelligence.

  • Improved Speed

The traditional habits of looking into books index to access resources is now a thing of the past. Thank God you’re born in the 21st century, where you can now gain access to information speedily. On arriving at a resource, you just search the document though typing a keyword.

Additionally, mathematical programs that took decades to finish can now be completed in far quicker ways through special programs. Mathematical graphs are also plotted pretty quickly.

  • Divided Attention Disorder–DAD

While using technology for educational purposes, you will barely overcome the urge to check at your social pages. Most likely, you will be easily distracted from work, an affliction dubbed DAD (divided attention disorder).

Most temptations associated with DAD include the temptation to download a file, check bank balances, comment on a friend’s post/update, or speak to someone on a smartphone. Just Imagine how long then it will take to finish an essay or some informative read up.  

  • Change of roles

Technology is changing the roles of both teachers and learners. For example, in traditional learning set up, a teacher is the source of information and student the receiver.

This has for long been the practice, but, with access to lots of educational information through tech, shifting the role of a teacher to the “guide on the side”. On the other side, students take more responsibility for their own learning—without a supervisor. Additionally, you will realize that schools and universities all over the world are rolling out their learning programs to foster more use of technology.

Technology and education are always advancing; be sure you follow GradGuard on social media for all the tech updates within the industry!


Career Other

Tips to Improve Testing Performance

April 3, 2019

No matter how confident you may be, final exams are almost certain to provoke anxiety. Your performance on these tests is crucial to your academic standing, and the opportunity for do-overs is rare to nonexistent. That’s why you may be stressed out, even if you understand the material. But letting it overwhelm you could lead to serious issues. You might begin to second-guess yourself, lose sleep or forget the things you spent so much time studying. This is why it’s a good strategy for students to embrace a proven routine to prepare for tests and manage stress.

Taking care of your body can be almost as beneficial as studying when it comes to improving your performance on midterms or finals. That’s because your physical state can have a significant impact on your ability to memorize, think and reason. Neglecting to take care of your health and well-being could result in your brain functioning at less than full capacity. Getting plenty of sleep, eating right, and drinking enough water can all boost your test-taking abilities and maybe even help you attain better grades.

For example, many students don’t realize that proper hydration is crucial to their performance at exam time. Dehydration can lead to irritability, fatigue, and lethargy — all of which will keep you from doing your best work. People who drink a bottle of water while taking an exam perform slightly better than those who don’t, according to research. Good nutrition also can play an important role in how well you’ll do on your tests. That’s because the brain uses as much as 20 percent of the body’s daily energy needs. Eating healthy can help you remain alert and energetic, so you won’t falter during the marathon that is finals week.

Given how important grades can be to your future, you need to be at your best during testing time. Don’t let bad habits like filling up with junk food or sleeping poorly hurt your chances to succeed. See the following tips you can use to reduce stress and ensure that you’ll be firing on all cylinders during exams.

Breathing Techniques

It is scientifically proven that using proper breathing techniques can help improve the ability to retain information while studying and taking an exam. While you are studying, take a deep breath through your nostrils, then hold for 3-5 seconds. Then, exhale for 1-2 seconds.

Proper Rest

It is important to sleep well before an exam, as your mind responds more quickly and efficiently when it is well rested. In turn, there is no need to stay up all night trying to “cram” information. Make sure you are attempting to get at least 8 hours of sleep before an exam. Try to set your alarm 1 hour before the time you need to actually wake up. This way, you can benefit from hitting the snooze button a couple times in order to feel more rested.

Hydration

Researchers have found that those who drink a bottle of water during their exam have scored an average of 5% higher than those who don’t. Dehydration can make you feel sluggish, irritable and tired. Bring a bottle of water to your finals. Your brain will thank you!

Healthy Diet

Although the brain is one of the smallest organs in the body, it can use up to 20% of the energy we need every day. By having the right foods and drinks to energize your system, they can improve attentiveness and help sustain you through many exam hours. On the contrary, making the wrong dietary choices can make you feel slow and tired. It’s important not to skip meals — especially breakfast. After waking up, your body hasn’t had any food for several hours during sleep. Breakfast can give you the energy you need to start the day right.

*Opt for healthy snacks such as fresh fruit, popcorn, fruit scones, dried fruit, yogurt or nuts to keep you going throughout the day.

Testing season is definitely a stressful one, but as long as you remember these tips from GradGuard, it will be smooth sailing!

Author bio: Dr. Kenya Grooms is a clinical psychologist and Dean of Student Affairs at MacCormac College, the oldest two-year, private, nonprofit institution in Illinois. MacCormac offers educational programs for court reporting, criminal justice, business administration and more. Dr. Grooms has written and presented about family life, international partnerships, personal resilience, support services for non-traditional students and many other topics in psychology.

Health Other

5 Tips to Avoid Failure and Raise Your Grade

March 25, 2019

Lооkіng tо bring уоur grаdеѕ up tо thе nеxt level? Nо matter іf уоu аrе trуіng tо tаkе уоur B tо аn A оr аvоіd being placed on асаdеmіс probation, hеrе іѕ a guide thаt аll ѕtudеntѕ саn fоllоw tо іnсrеаѕе their GPA.

1. Fіnd Out Whаt Yоu Arе Dоіng Wrong

Sоmе саѕеѕ аrе ореn аnd shut. Are you:

  • Gоіng tо сlаѕѕ rеgulаrlу?
  • Completing assignments on time?
  • Trуіng уоur bеѕt?

If you answered “nо” fоr аnу оf thе аbоvе, thіѕ іѕ whеrе уоu should start іmрrоvіng. Sсrоll thrоugh your соurѕе syllabus аnd identify whісh lеѕѕоnѕ уоu retained аnd whісh оnеѕ wеrе lоѕt іn уоu. Stіll dоn’t knоw whаt уоu dоn’t know? Find a frіеnd аnd соmраrе their syllabus wіth уоurѕ. Whаt dо уоur сhесk marks аnd уоur Xs ѕау tо you?

Sometimes students struggle with courses even though they are completing all of the assignments and putting in the effort. In these instances, you will need to get outside help with the course. The first place to go is to your professor.

2. Rесruіt Yоur Professor’s Hеlр

Bеlіеvе іt оr nоt, mоѕt professorѕ wаnt hеlр уоu succeed. In fact, thеу typically set aside office hours in order to assist students with additional questions or students that are struggling with the course material.

Go to your professor’s office hours. Ask them to go through your assignments with you and give you additional feedback on where the issues arose. If you have questions about the lecture, bring in your notes and ask them to go over them with you.

3. Mаkе Uѕе Of Thе Academic Support Programs At Your School

Almоѕt аll post-secondary ѕсhооlѕ offer Studеnt Lеаrnіng Suрроrt: a group оf ѕеrvісеѕ аnd programs dеdісаtеd tо helping students bесоmе mоrе еffесtіvеlу іnvоlvеd іn thеіr ѕtudіеѕ. Sound fаmіlіаr? Many students don’t realize that these programs also involve math and writing support for students. These may include private lessons, tutoring or even proofreading or feedback on assignments and projects. You should also see if there are any students in your courses that have or are looking to form a study group, or are even offering tutoring services.

4. Tаkе Bеttеr Nоtеѕ

Different methods will work for different people, so try out some different ways and see which works best for you. Experts and bloggers insist that handwritten notes are the way to go. Others state that notes should be written with the intention of explaining the concepts to a friend. Breaking down and explaining concepts to others, helps us to better retain information.

The disability services department at your school may also need volunteers to share their notes from the lectures and provide copies to students that use their services. Taking notes with this in mind may make your own notes more clear and concise. Providing those notes to someone who may need them creates a win-win situation.

5. Bесоmе A Grаdе Grubbеr

You need to embrace the idea that every point counts in your course. If there is a discussion post that’s only worth 1 point, make sure not to skip over it. If your professor counts attendance for their lectures, show up to every class, even if most other students don’t. Put on a smile and try to have a positive attitude. Be sure to do the following:

  • Rеvіеw thе rubrіс: The rubric will break down each assignments grade by category. Pay attention to each segment and make sure you read the instructions and rubric thoroughly and follow the instructions exactly.
  • Prераrе fоr thе wоrѕt: Any good professor should listen to your concerns and consider what you say. Keep in mind, they are not required to alter any of your grades based on what the rubric shows. If you are not sure why you received a particular grade, ask them to explain the grade given and how to improve in the future.

Fоllоw thе ѕtерѕ аbоvе & hореfullу, whеn Aunt Brеndа аѕkѕ “Hоw’ѕ School?” durіng your uрсоmіng vacation, уоu саn say “good” аnd actually mean it by following these tips from GradGuard.


Bio:
Nick Wilks is a marketer by profession at GoAssignmentHelp. With over 10 years of experience in online traffic generation through his blogs, Nick helps clients use content marketing and social media to grow their business. Driven by a passion for helping businesses grow, Nick can be found sharing his knowledge on blogs.

Other Student Life

11 Useful Apps for College Students

March 12, 2019

Going to college will change your life forever, but it can be difficult to keep up with that change without a helping hand. From staying on top of your schoolwork to remembering to cook and clean and finding ways to balance your time, it’s a delicate balancing act that takes work to get right. Luckily, we’ve pulled together this list of eleven of the best apps to help you out.

Dropbox:Chances are that you’ve already heard of Dropbox. It allows you to store your files in the cloud, to access them from any device and even keeps backups of older versions.

Wunderlist:Wunderlist is a cloud-based to-do list app that does it all. You can create multiple different lists and organise them into folders, and you can also create shared to-do lists for multiple people.

Evernote:Evernote is arguably the most powerful note-taking app on the planet, which makes it perfect for jotting down information in lectures. You can back the notes up to the cloud and access them on any device, too.

Exam Countdown Lite: This free tracker app allows you to input the dates of each of your exams and to view real-time countdowns. You can also ccustomize the colors and icons for different subjects to make it easy to tell them apart.

Forest: Forest aims to help you to focus on a single task, whether that’s reading or revising. When you boot it up, it allows you to grow a virtual forest by not touching your phone, and you can even spend in-app tokens to plant trees in the real world.

TED: TED’s mobile app makes it easy to browse and view the latest talks, with over 3,000 on-demand videos on all sorts of subjects. That makes it a great app to squeeze some extra learning into those inevitable dead spots in your day.

Google Drive/Docs: Google Drive and Google Docs go hand-in-hand and can be a great way to store and share documents. It’s also perfect for group projects because multiple users can work on the same document at the same time.

Grammar.ly:Struggling with an essay? Grammar.ly is great for double checking your spelling and grammar, although it’s not as good as working with a professional. One alternative if you’re looking for the human touch is to go for Ggrade Miners instead.

Chegg Books: Chegg Books is an app that allows you to search for and to rent textbooks and other study materials to save you money. For some people, it pays for itself – after all, you can always rent out some books of your own.

RealCalc Scientific Calculator: If you’re studying a science or mathematics based degree then this is the app for you. There’s no need to carry a bulky physical calculator around when this free app is on hand with all of the functionality still on offer.

iStudiez Pro0: This app comes in at $2.99, but it’s worth the money because it allows you to track homework, grades, and assignments and to ssynchronize it across different devices. It’ll send reminders, too.

Now that GradGuard has provided you with which apps to use, the next step is to get downloading and to familiarize yourself with their interfaces. Remember that not all of these apps will be perfect for you, and that’s okay. Your challenge is to find out which apps work best for you and to make them a part of your daily routine. Good luck.

BIO: Lauren Adley is a writer and editor at AustralianWritings. She is dedicated to her family, work and friends. She is keen on reading, playing the guitar and traveling. She is interested in educational, marketing and blogging issues. Feel free to connect with her on Twitter and Google+.