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Student Life Transition

Must-Know Tips for Incoming College Freshmen

September 27, 2021

Heading off to college is one of the most thrilling times for many young adults. With a brand-new environment, exciting new experiences, new friendships and your future ahead of you, there are plenty of things to be excited about; however, for many, this can also be an intimidating experience. If you want to enjoy your first few weeks of college and put yourself on the path to a successful future, here are a few must-know tips.

Develop a Healthy Diet Plan

Freshman fifteen is a worrisome experience for many new incoming students. You may suddenly have a whole new sense of control over what you eat and when you do. If you want to enjoy your first year at college, you need to have a plan for a health-friendly diet, which means getting the right nutrients and avoiding processed foods. Once you know your schedule, consider what a nutritious meal plan can look like and set some guidelines for yourself. Don’t forget vitamins and supplements to help keep you on track!

Explore the Campus

Another common plight of first-year students is getting lost on campus. Due to the vast exponential size of many college campuses and the newness of the territory, it can be easy to get lost and confused. The last thing you will want to do is be late or unable to find your way. If you want to make for a smoother transition, take time to explore the campus and get acclimated. Not only can this help you be on time, but it can also help you find the best eateries and cool spots to hang out on campus.

Get Organized

If you are accustomed to adults keeping you organized, college may present numerous challenges. With you being on your own for the first time, you need to learn how to get organized. Whether this is organizing your class schedule, assignments, laundry schedule or even just your room, there are plenty of areas that you need to learn how to manage on your own.

Get to Know Your Advisor

One of your greatest resources on campus is your advisor. This person is meant to help guide you and offer advice as you take on your college experience. Your job is to know when and how to ask for help. You can use this person as a sounding board and another source of support, so make sure that you prioritize cultivating a relationship with them.

Be Open to Trying New Things

College is a time of massive transition. This adjustment can take time and at times feel uncomfortable; however, if you want to make the most of your college experience, you should be open to trying new things. Introducing yourself to strangers, joining a new club or trying a new class may change your life, and all you need to do is be open to the experience. The exciting and reassuring part of this is that you can know that everyone else is experiencing the same thing.

Venturing into the collegiate experience can hold boundless opportunities and exciting experiences. With a bit of planning, preparation and intention behind your decision-making, you can assuage all of your anxieties and open yourself up to this wondrous new opportunity.

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Adulting Career Transition

4 Tips for Finding Your First Job After College

September 18, 2021

Though you may have been able to follow a clearly defined path towards graduation throughout your college experience, at a certain point that path ends and another begins. As you finish your degree, the time comes to embark on the search to find your first job. This can be intimidating, but a basic knowledge of some of the best practices for first-time job seekers can make the initial search much smoother. Here are a few tips and suggestions to help you prepare for finding your first job after college.

Perfect Your Application Tools

It can be helpful to hone a variety of different skills that can make the application process smoother while simultaneously increasing your chances of landing a job.

One critical element of the modern recruiting landscape is a solid, polished online presence. Ideally, this is something you should be working on far in advance of your first application via cultivating a positive, professional manner throughout all of your social media interactions. Past behaviors, comments, and attitudes can all come back to haunt candidates as recruiters scour their online profiles in an attempt to learn more about them.

With that said, even if you haven’t taken the time to do so yet, it is never too late to start cleaning up one’s online presence. Make sure to clean up your common social media profiles and take time to create a fully filled out LinkedIn profile in order to facilitate your communication with other professionals in your field as well as potential workplace recruiters.

It’s also crucial to prepare your resume ahead of time. While you may not have a plethora of past experiences to populate it with, a well thought out resume that properly represents your professional and academic experience, as well as any other relevant skills, is important.

When you go to apply, ensure that every application is uniquely crafted for the position you’re applying for.

Network, Network, Network

Whether you’re an industry leader with a dozen years of experience or a fledgling college graduate, the power of networking cannot be underestimated. While readers of this article will likely still be in the early stages of their career, it is still absolutely worth the time to invest in networking with professionals within your industry. Great avenues for networking include attending professional organization meetings for those in your field and reaching out to a potential mentor on social media. Whatever avenue you choose, finding ways to network is an excellent way to increase your chances of finding a job quickly.

Use the Resources You Have Available

College graduates typically have a host of various resources available to aid them in their search for employment. If your institution has a good alumni network, it can be beneficial to try to tap into it. Another option is to take advantage of your school’s career center and meet with a career counselor to discuss ways to go about your job search. This can be helpful for refining your search, perfecting your resume, and helping to work through any other questions you might have.

Making It Through the Interview

There’s nothing more exciting (or nerve-wracking) than getting your first interview. Naturally, you’re going to want to do everything you can to prove you’re the best candidate for the job. Here are a few tips for successful interviews:

First and foremost, you need to dress the part. Even if the job you applied for has a casual dress code (or you’ll be working from home in your pajamas), you must dress professionally for your interview. First impressions are everything! 

Second, it’s always a good idea to practice your answers to common interview questions. You don’t want to find yourself tongue-tied or coming up blank when potential employers are asking questions you should have expected. It’s practically inevitable that you’ll be asked the old chestnut “Tell me about yourself,” so be ready with a professional, authentic answer.

Finally, whatever you do, don’t speak negatively about your previous employers. Prospective employers will end up thinking you aren’t capable of resolving problems with your managers through negotiation and diplomacy. You may be perceived as a gossip, complainer, or simply unprofessional. If you’re asked why you left previous jobs, have constructive answers that don’t put the blame on a specific person (i.e. “there was no room for advancement.”)

Accepting a Job

Once you begin to hear back from recruiters, you’re going to want to prepare for job offers that could follow. If you decide to accept a job, make sure to be thoughtful and respectful in your acceptance in order to maintain a professional demeanor as you prepare to join the ranks of your new employer.

Typically, a job will first be offered over the phone or in person. If you accept, a formal job offer letter will follow. If you feel you need time to consider the offer, don’t be afraid to ask. In fact, rushing to accept a job can often be a mistake. Just make sure your request for time is made respectfully. Once accepted, make sure you understand when you are to begin working. The one thing you should absolutely avoid doing at this point is negotiating over the salary. This should be done earlier in the process and can appear dishonest if done after an offer has been made.

As a final note, once you receive the formal job offer letter itself, make sure to respond appropriately in turn. There is more than one way to accept a job offer, and it’s likely you’ll accept the offer initially over the phone. However, whether you accepted on the phone, or asked for additional time to make your choice, once you have reached a conclusion, it is important to confirm your acceptance of the job offer in writing. An official job offer thank you letter typically reiterates the primary details of the offer, the start date, and a personal acknowledgment of your interest or excitement in starting at the company.

Confidence is Key

If you take the time to prepare for your job search, you are much more likely to find success quickly. Not only that, but a professional approach to your search and a polished, pulled-together demeanor as you go through the hiring process will enable you to start your new job with confidence and likely create an added level of respect from your new employer as well.

BIO: Sam Bowman has a passion for learning. As a seasoned professional writer, he specializes in topics about people, education, tech and how they merge. In his spare time he likes running, reading, and combining the two in a run to his local bookstore.

Adulting Career Transition

10 Most Common Business Plan Presentation Mistakes to Avoid

September 8, 2021

Making the leap from college student to entrepreneur can be daunting; especially when pitching your idea to investors. Presenting college projects to peers and professors may have given you some experience, but successfully selling your business plan to a room full of executives requires practice, polish, and professionalism.

To avoid the most common mistakes, follow these top tips:

1. Poor Time Management

A thorough business plan presentation should last about an hour. If you’re the person presenting, the responsibility of time management is yours.

You need to plan your use of time carefully, or risk running out of time to explain essential aspects of your idea.

2. Not Pitching Correctly

It’s not uncommon for several members of a team to attend a presentation. However, investors want to hear from the CEO.

If the CEO isn’t adept at public speaking, they’ll need to practice. This isn’t a college group project, it’s a business pitch. Relying on others to pull the CEO through isn’t going to cut it.

3. Forgetting Visual Elements

Not every investor pays attention to visual slides—but some will be put off if you don’t provide them.

Create a detailed visual presentation, just in case. Visual presentations are the gold standard in the business world, and most investors will expect you to bring one along.

4. Not Identifying the ‘Big Problem’

Your presentation should start by highlighting WHY your company has been created. If you don’t address this driving force in detail, you can’t explain how your business aims to solve it.

5. Failing to Be Convincing

Your presentation must be convincing. You can achieve this by implementing a mix of credible and accurate information, honest forecasts, confidence, and personal belief in your business plan and capabilities.

6. Lacking in Focus

The last thing you want during a presentation is to veer off on a tangent. One question from an investor can send a conversation down dozens of different paths, few of which were included in your original strategy.

If your meeting veers off course, respectfully regain control and direction.

7. Telling a Weak Story

Your business plan needs to tell a story, and your presentation gives you the chance to relay that story to investors. If your storyline is poorly coordinated or weak, investors may not see the merit in investing in you.

Make your business’s story coherent, compelling, and told in enough detail to make sense to outside parties. There may be a generation gap you need to account for.

8. Ignoring Your Audience

The point of your presentation is to demonstrate how you can make investors’ money. Your interviewers are assessing whether you’re a good investment.

You’ll need to ditch the student mindset and focus on how your ideas and skills can benefit investors. Leave out your college achievements, sports trophies, or hobbies. They’re not relevant!

9. Underestimating Your Competition

Confidently stating your business won’t face any competition is not a smart move. Such bold assertions make you seem egotistical, arrogant, and poorly read.

If you conduct enough market research, you’ll always find competition, no matter your sector or market. Being honest about potential challenges shows you’re reasonable and level-headed.

10. Dressing Too Casually

The point of a business plan presentation is to impress investors. Stereotypical student attire has no place at a pitch.

You’re going from the dorm room to the boardroom and need to look the part. Dressing smartly and professionally will make you seem mature and capable.

You can always put on your hoodie once the seed money is in the bank!

Transition

Tips for Your First Post-Grad Home

September 3, 2021

According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, about 4.5 million college diplomas are issued each year. If one of them is yours, congratulations! You’ve put in the time, effort, and dedication to get your degree and officially start your life.

You might have a career lined up, or at least a pathway toward what you really want to do. But, that’s only half the battle after you’ve graduated. You also need a place to stay. Moving into your first home, post-grad can be an exciting transition. It also might be the first time you’re officially out on your own and not in a dorm.

So, there are some things to consider.

Buying a home is a long-term investment. Thinking about the financial aspects as well as establishing a sense of permanency should be at the top of your priority list. Thankfully, the experience can be a positive one if you know a few tips about what to expect. Let’s cover a few.

Determine What You Want

The first step in buying (or renting) a home is to decide what you want. Consider things like:

●  Location

●  Safety

●  Accessibility

●  Type of home

If you have a job lined up already, consider yourself lucky – 45% of 2020 grads are still looking for work, but that’s largely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Maybe you’ve just been able to land a post-grad job for the first time and you’re looking for the right place to live. Finding a home near your place of work will make life much easier. If you don’t want to live too close to a city, you’ll at least want to make sure you have an easy commute. 

Having goals when it comes to what you want will help you to stay focused throughout your home-buying experience. With that in mind, understand that it doesn’t need to be a “buying” experience at all. Whether you don’t have a job lined up or you’re not ready to commit to something permanent, you might want to consider renting.

Renting has become a popular option. Over 44 million people in the U.S. rent their homes. It’s a great way to save money without any long-term commitments. Plus, many rental agreements allow you to decorate the way you want, which can help turn any space into a real home – especially when you’re on a budget.

Figure Out Your Finances

The financial side of homeownership can be the most stressful. Many graduates are stacked with debt after college, which can make it hard to get a loan. Even if you’re approved, you have to make sure you can afford to live in a house. There’s more to factor in than just a mortgage payment, including:

●  Utilities

●  Homeowners insurance

●  Repairs

●  Maintenance

You may want to take some time to save up for a house before deciding to make a purchase. Most mortgage companies will recommend having at least 20% to put down on a home. While there are exceptions, it’s a good idea to have at least some money “socked away” for your future home. Consider moving back home for a while to save money and establish credit.

There are plenty of ways you can save along the way. Cut back on dining out, get rid of some subscription services, or even sell a few belongings that you don’t want or need. Having a yard sale is an easy way to declutter and make some money to put into savings or to use while you’re searching for a job. If you’re too busy to set up a traditional sale, consider hosting one online to make your life easier. Get creative with your saving and budgeting techniques, and you’ll have your down payment in no time!

Make a Permanent and Professional Space

Once you’ve finally moved into your first post-grad home, there are still a few things to keep in mind. First, it’s important to make the space your own as soon as possible. This is a place of permanence, but also the first place where you’ll be starting a professional lifestyle. So, be sure to hang that diploma somewhere prominent in a quality frame and be proud of it!

It’s also important to feel comfortable in your new space. That’ll boost productivity and reduce stress levels, so your home can feel more like your own personal sanctuary. There are plenty of ways to make any house feel more like a home, including:

●  Hanging artwork

●  Keeping it clean

●  Displaying items that bring you happiness

●  Adding natural light

●  Give it a “signature scent” with candles or plug-ins

It can take about six weeks to really feel “at home” in a new space. Adding personal touches everywhere will make that process easier on you. In just a few weeks, you’ll be able to look back on the entire post-grad home-buying/renting experience and feel even more excited for the next chapter of your life.

BIO: Dan Matthews is a writer with a degree in English from Boise State University. He has extensive experience writing online at the intersection of business, finance, marketing, and culture.

Student Life Transition

High Paying Jobs for Students With Loans

July 24, 2021

College is expensive, and there is no way around that. So what we find ourselves doing is taking out more student loans and graduating with more and more student debts. And the worst part is that some loans can take decades to pay off, which puts certain aspects of our lives on hold. 

However, some students can get rid of their student loans quicker than others based on their career choices. This guide will show you the best jobs that can help you pay off your student loan debts faster. 

  1. Physician 

It’s great to complete both an undergraduate program and medical school. But, unfortunately, physicians, anesthesiologists, GPs, surgeons, and other medical professionals can be saddled with massive student debts. 

Fortunately, most graduates of any of these programs can get a first-year salary of about $210,000. That can help you make significant improvements with your student loan repayment. 

  1. Analytics Manager 

Are you data-minded? You can put your skills to use as an analytic manager. To pursue this career, you must acquire a bachelor’s degree in statistics, math, IT, or other related fields. Data analysts help organizations and companies to make high-quality informed decisions based on statistical analysis. You can get between $80,000 and $90,000 a year. 

  1. Software Architect 

Software developers or architects are the geniuses behind your favorite computer programs and apps. If you have a knack for this career, you should pursue a computer science degree and specialize in development. 

You’ll need many hands-on experiences to secure a position in this field. So it’s advisable to search for internship opportunities while still enrolled in school. That can shoot up your chances of securing a job position. 

That’s why the competition between developers can be fierce, and their salaries tend to start just below $100,000.

  1. Air Traffic Controller 

It’s not a simple task to maintain the traffic flow around airports and throughout the world. However, air traffic controllers are the most detailed-oriented problem solvers, and they have excellent organizational skills. 

If you want to pursue a job in this field, you need to complete a bachelor’s degree program, including courses at the Federal Aviation Administration. Don’t worry about the extra schooling, though, as you may get about $110,000 a year. 

  1. Financial Manager 

If you enjoy managing money and working with numbers, you should consider acquiring a degree in finance. As a financial manager, you can help organizations, companies, and various people keep their economic lives intact. 

Financial managers produce and analyze financial reports, direct investments and can make about $115,000 every year. 

  1. Pharmacist 

Pharmacists work alongside doctors and patients to make sure that prescription medications are used safely. When you complete four years of pharmacy school and pass two license exams, you get your Pharm.D. From there, you can work at pharmacies located in health facilities, grocery stores, and drug stores and earn around $120,000 a year. 

  1. IT Manager Or Computer Systems Manager 

Information Technology managers or Computer Systems Manager assist in coordinating and directing computer-related activities. For example, if an organization needs a new computer system, the IT manager would coordinate everything. 

With a bachelor’s degree and a bit of experience, you can make around $125,000 a year. However, you can get more experience by taking internships while you’re in school. 

  1. Lawyer 

You can consider law if you’re not interested in any of the careers mentioned. Lawyers work with clients in both civil and criminal lawsuits in many different areas of the law. Depending on the area of expertise you choose, you can get between $80,000 to $160,000. 

Final Thoughts 

Student loans can be a huge burden to carry, which can leave you frustrated at times. However, one of the best ways to pay off your debts, besides public service loan forgiveness programs, is to get a high-paying job. Use this guide as a step in the right direction. If you don’t know what to do, we recommend talking to an expert to help you. 

Student Life Transition

Should You Pursue a Postgraduate Degree?

July 20, 2021

After graduating, most students head into the workforce. However, some find themselves in a post-grad slump and rather than transition into the “real world”, they choose to study further. Education is never a bad thing, but there are times it may not be the right decision. If you’re thinking of pursuing a postgraduate degree, here’s what to consider.

5 Reasons Why a Postgrad Degree Makes Sense

If a postgraduate degree will support your career goals, pursuing it makes sense.

1.  It can give you an extra edge in the job market

When you first graduate, you’re competing against other graduates as well as more experienced players in your field. Completing a postgrad degree could give you a competitive advantage in the job market. 

2.  You want a higher salary

The average annual salary for someone with a bachelor’s degree is approximately $59,124 compared to $69,732 for someone with a master’s degree and $84,396 with a doctorate degree. 

3.  You want to specialise or improve your expertise 

An advanced degree is worthwhile if you want to improve your skills or specialize. Let’s say you did a general degree like business administration. Studying for a postgrad in finance or economics could sharpen your skills and boost your credibility.

4.  You aspire to a leadership position

An additional degree can improve your chances of moving up the ladder. Many C-suite executives have completed an MBA (Master’s of Business Administration). However, degrees in science and engineering are also popular among executives.

5.  Your profession values additional letters behind your title 

In certain professions such as the medical, academic, or science fields, a master’s, doctorate or PhD degree is highly valued. It may earn you more respect and make you more employable. In fact, the lack of an advanced degree could actually hold you back. 

4 Reasons you should not do a postgrad degree 

Furthering your studies is a huge investment of time and money. So, you need to be sure you’re doing it for the right reasons. Here are a few reasons not to do it. 

1.  You’re doing it for prestige

Be clear on why you want to further your studies. Is it to keep up with your peers or for prestige? If you see it as a status symbol, this is the wrong reason to pursue a postgrad degree. 

2.  You’re time poor

If you have found employment or started a family, you may not have time for studies. Attending classes, studying for exams, and researching and writing dissertations take a lot of time. Can you fit it all in? Rather than overstretch yourself, it may be best to postpone your studies until you have more free time.

3. You’re unsure of your career goals 

The average person changes careers 5-7 times in their lifetime. How confident are you that you’ll want to remain in your chosen field 10 years from now? If you’re unsure, it may be best to gain some work experience first and reevaluate your career path later on. Then you can select a course of study that better aligns with the new direction you want to take. 

4.  You can’t afford it 

If you relied on a loan for your bachelor’s degree, increasing your student debt to get a postgrad degree may not be wise. If you can’t afford it, don’t do it — at least not now. You can always pursue a postgrad degree later on when you are more financially secure.

Should you decide to embark on a postgraduate degree, GradGuard can help protect your tuition fees. Our tuition insurance will reimburse your college fees should you be unable to complete your studies due to a serious illness or accident. 

BIO: Deevra Norling is a freelance content writer. She’s covered topics such as entrepreneurship, small business, career, human resources, e-commerce, and finance. When not writing, she’s tossing balls on the beach with the four-legged fur babies she looks after as a professional pet sitter.

Career Transition

Finding Meaning in Your Work

June 14, 2021

You might love your job but sometimes wonder what you’re actually contributing to the world. There’s a common misconception that you have to work for places like a charitable organization, a research lab creating cures for illnesses, or an activist group to make a difference. These are just examples, of course. But, sitting behind your desk might not always feel fulfilling.

Maybe it should.

By changing how you think about work, you’ll start to see there are small things you can do each day to make a difference and find meaning.

Not sure just what those everyday meaningful moments might look like? Let’s talk about what you can do and the impact it can have.

How to Find Fulfillment in Your Work

It’s not necessarily up to your job to bring you a sense of purpose. You have to decide what that is on your own, and come up with personal ways to make your life more meaningful. That often starts with changing your perspective.

Start within your business. How does your specific job impact your coworkers, clients, customers, or anyone you interact with? Consider some of the following careers in data analytics:

  • IoT specialist
  • Data orchestrator
  • Data hygienist
  • Machine teacher
  • CIO

On the surface, you might not think those careers are helping anyone. But, it’s about how you analyze data and what you do with it that makes a difference. Most researchers are collecting data and putting it to use for good reasons – mostly to help the planet and/or mankind. That’s something you can feel good about.

Are you a web designer or programmer? Consider how making the sites you create more accessible can help others to use the web freely. Do you work in marketing? Focus on “green” efforts that can reduce your agency’s carbon footprint. Are you a business person? Have a positive impact on your whole team by hosting brainstorming sessions and making everyone feel valued.

We could list examples all day. The point is, whether you’re a corporate CEO or flipping hamburgers for a living, you can find meaning in your work when you look for ways to do it.

Pursuing a Positive Career

If you’re just graduating college and entering the workforce, you have a unique opportunity. You get to choose your own career path and look for jobs that will provide you with a sense of meaning.

Consider what you’re truly passionate about and any jobs that might allow you to do something with them. If your biggest concern is the environment, for example, you might want to work for a business that is focused on sustainability efforts.

Even if you can’t directly work with a business dedicated to such things, you can be a voice and a light wherever you work. Change the company culture by advocating for recycling programs and environmentally-friendly upgrades. Again, seeking out ways to make changes and find meaning can make all the difference.

You’ve probably heard the saying “it’s the little things that count”. Consider the things you can do every day at your job – no matter how small – that might have a more meaningful impact on someone else than you originally thought. The more you focus on those things, the better you’ll feel about the purpose of your career.

BIO: Sam Bowman has a passion for learning. As a seasoned professional writer, he specializes in topics about people, education, tech and how they merge. In his spare time he likes running, reading, and combining the two in a run to his local bookstore.

Adulting Transition

3 Tips to Help You Plan for Home Ownership in College

May 26, 2021

Many younger Americans say they are in no rush to become homeowners, and instead want to focus on enjoying life experiences. However, on the flip side, there is also a growing percentage of younger adults working towards homeownership before 35. In fact, many of them are planning to buy their first home while they’re still in college. If you’re thinking of homeownership, you will need to be careful to avoid making common money mistakes in college. Planning ahead gives you ample time to prepare – if you know where to start.

Weigh The Pros And Cons Of Early Homeownership 

College graduates spend three to six months after graduation job hunting. They are also very occupied with setting up their lives, either renting an apartment or focusing on paying off student loan debt. Adding a monthly mortgage to that list can be tough, and should only be undertaken with proper planning. Renting after college also comes with less financial commitment, which can be a good thing. If you haven’t decided where to live or your career path, it may be difficult to stick to a long-term decision like buying a home.

There are also great perks to getting on the property ladder instead of renting. Depending on the location you choose, a mortgage can sometimes be cheaper than renting. If you’re in a good credit position after college and have little debt, it increases your chances of getting a mortgage in the long run. Lastly, if you purchase a home while you’re in college, you could be better off financially by saving on dorm costs. Renting out your home can be a stable income stream. Consider all of these pros and cons before making your decision to become a homeowner.

Narrow Down The Location Early

The earlier you know where you want to own a home, the better prepared you can be to do so. If you choose to, you can buy a home close to your college and skip the boarding costs on campus. Alternatively, you could rent it out to fellow students to help with paying your mortgage. Another reason to choose your location early is that it helps you track home prices and how much you need to save before applying for a mortgage.

Work On Reducing Your Debt 

Many young people are delaying homeownership because of student loans. In a survey by Clever, half of undergraduate students said they would have to put off buying a home to repay their student loans. Around 43 percent of Americans who attended college have some sort of student loan debt to their names, along with credit card or personal loan debts outstanding. When it comes to credit cards and students, starting earlier is always better. 

To make money, consider getting a part-time job while you’re in college, or launching a side business. There are many earning opportunities for college students, including tutoring or on-campus jobs. Also, learn to stick to a budget. If you are not familiar with budgeting and money management, a great place to start is inquiring if your college offers personal finance classes.

Bottom Line

There are many reasons why buying a house in college makes sense. Equally, there are many reasons against it. While real estate can be a great investment in the long term, it’s not universally applicable. The area you choose, your personal finance habits, and the additional expenses that come with homeownership should factor into your decisions. For some, it may be a great dream. For others, it may be too much too soon.

Student Life Transition

8 Tips To Rely on When Choosing a University

May 19, 2021

Choosing a university is a pretty stressful experience. After all, you will likely spend at least 4 years there!

The great variety of universities doesn’t make the choice any easier. So what should you look out for while choosing a higher education institution?

Here are 8 bulletproof tips to rely on while choosing a college or university!

Decide On a Major

Some universities are famous for their science labs while others are most known for their amazing writers and innovative artists. After you have chosen what field you want to work in, take a look at top-performing universities in the industry. It will narrow down the choice significantly.

Choose a Location

If you are not comfortable living too far away from friends and family, don’t choose a location across the country. The experience will be overshadowed by a constant feeling of missing everyone. Staying closer to home will probably save you a lot of money, too! Everyone’s situation is unique.

Also, climate matters. Do you tolerate heat well? What is too cold for you? Does rainy weather make you sick? Keep all of this in mind when choosing where to attend school.

Learn More About the Campus

You will spend a lot of time on campus so you might want to discover whether it suits your preference. Check how busy it is, what vibe it has, what typical students are like, and whether professors have a big flow of students they barely know or they are available to answer all the questions and help. What is the town or city like that surrounds the campus? Make sure to check out the crime rate and if desirable locations to live if you were to choose to attend a school there.

Determine Your Budget

Some cities and universities are more costly than others. It is not only about tuition but about the cost of accommodation, food, textbooks, etc. Find out about available scholarships and internships as well. It’s not worth the heartbreak to fall in love with a campus only to find out the cost of attendance is way out of your budget.

Check Student Accommodations

If you want to leave your hometown, student accommodation is an essential criterion. If you think that it is just the place where you will sleep and it does not matter, you will be surprised how much it can change your college experience. Find out the condition of rooms, services like laundry, and the number of roommates you may have. Depending on each individual’s situation, you may want to locate student disabilities, work-study options, veteran services, or other campus outreach programs.

Learn More About Student Life

College years are the best. However, it mostly depends on you and the university. Check what clubs and societies there are on campus, what kind of events are organized, and also some opportunities for volunteering and getting to know people.

Check Out Opportunities

Going to college is a great opportunity to discover the world and yourself. Check what exchange programs, conferences, or internships you may try while studying. Many campuses have resource offices and student success programs that have more information about these opportunities.

Rank Your Needs

It’s unlikely there is a university that fulfill each and every one of your requirements. Take a look at previous points and rank what is more important to you: costs, location, or accommodation. It will make the final choice much easier. 

Stick to these tips and make a more accurate and thought-through choice. We hope you will find the right fit and have the time of your life on campus!

BIO: Susan Craig is an experienced writer and active contributor for Studocu.  She is fond of blogging, motivation articles, and management. Her goal is to provide quality and inspiring content.

Career Student Life Transition

10 Powerful Tips For Graduates Entering The Workforce During COVID-19

April 29, 2021

Across many industries, the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have caused uncertainty, affecting employment and experience opportunities for new graduates entering the workforce. As one example, a growing number of candidates are now interviewed virtually, impacting the opportunity to build relationships with the people involved in recruiting.

On the extreme side of things, many of today’s recent graduates will also be required to start their professional careers from home. Here are some insights for successfully entering the workforce during COVID-19. 

#1: Don’t Stop Learning 

Graduating from college doesn’t mean you are done with learning. While the knowledge and certificate or degree you acquired are valuable possessions, they are not the only things that lead to success. Beyond academic knowledge, there are a lot of things left to be learned that will put you ahead of others in finding, achieving, and being successful in your work life.

#2: Look For Internships First 

Though it is good to have aspirations for high-paying jobs, it’ hard to go from graduate into lucrative roles without taking a few other steps first. The number of open vacancies for recent graduates is now limited than in the past. Businesses are still trying to figure out how COVID has impacted their company and the industry in general, and they aren’t willing to make financial commitments or take the same risks they did in the past. If entry-level positions are slim, check out internships. One could even land you a full-time position once it’s completed!

#3: Start Building A Portfolio 

A portfolio is documentary evidence of what you are capable of doing. When other candidates compete for the same jobs with traditional resumes and cover letters, having a portfolio will help to differentiate you as a valuable resource. When desirable opportunities are not available, consider starting private projects related to the types of jobs you’ll love to be doing in the future. Or, consider volunteering in similar roles to show your strengths.

#4: Commit To Proactive Networking 

Being proactive about networking will put you ahead of other people that are usually waiting in a reactionary mode. You might have heard that your net worth is directly related to your network.  And, most people are holding back interacting with others because of the pandemic….now is the time to stand-out and shine when others are waiting! If your LinkedIn profile isn’t already in top shape, spend some time to do and use it as one of your greatest networking tools.

#5: Embrace A Relentless Drive

For you to move from being a graduate into the world of work, you need a relentless drive. More than anything else, this characteristic will empower you to withstand inevitable obstacles you may discover along the way. And, you can share those learning experiences with potential employers. A strong work ethic can land you just about any job, regardless of experience.

#6: Be Adaptable To Change 

When you are entering the workforce as a graduate, you are bound to experience a lot of opportunities that don’t match your expectations. At that moment, your best bet is to be open and adaptable to change. All employers want people who can adapt and change course during challenging times. This goes along with your drive. Work hard and be relentless!

#7: Try New Things 

Both in terms of learning and networking, you must commit to trying new things. Another way to look at this is that you have to embrace going outside of your comfort zone. The world works differently because of COVID-19 and you need to learn how to adapt. This might mean taking the time to learn how to use the new software the company is using for all of its virtual meetings. Or, figuring out the ins and outs of a project management tool that seems confusing now, but will be instrumental in organizing your team’s projects down the line.

#8: Define Your Meaning of Success

The big question is this – what does career success mean to you? Once you clearly identify what success means to you, convey that to others in a way that relates to your personal values, vision, and life purpose. Once this is communicated clearly, others can understand how they can help you achieve this, and how it fits with their goals for recruiting the right talent.

#9: Set Measurable Goals 

Having a goal is important. But if you don’t have a way to measure progress towards accomplishment of your goals, achieving them is difficult. As important as it is to set goals, measuring progress, and modifying your strategy when needed, are also important. Don’t aim unrealistically high nor sell yourself short and aim too low.

#10: Find Your Internal Motivation 

Motivation is the fuel that drives people to accomplish their goals. Without it, life will seem like a challenge. However, people need to find what drives them and satisfies their sense of self-worth and purpose. External sources can motivate you to achieve some things for a little while; however, they’re limited in helping you attain long-term, sustained success.

Spend time gaining self-awareness about your strengths, your goals, your measures of success, and what can get in the way of attaining these things.  Once you understand yourself better, you’ll know what you need for continuous growth, and which career roles will be best for you.