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10 Crucial Campus Safety Tips

August 17, 2017

The yearly return to college each fall is an exciting and significant time for students, but it isn’t entirely without risks. This year, as classes beckon you back to campus, consider what you can do to ensure your own safety as well as that of others. September is National Campus Safety Awareness Month! Here’s a quick list to help you promote safety throughout your time at school.

Walk With Purpose

It’s no secret that anyone who appears to be new in town or otherwise unsure of themselves makes an easy target. Don’t be one of those people! Wherever you go, whether on campus or around town, be sure to walk with confidence and a purpose. Be aware of your surroundings at all times, and don’t be afraid to excuse yourself from any situation that makes you feel uncomfortable. Go with your gut: when it comes to your personal safety, you are your own greatest ally.

Be the Leader of the Pack

It’s an immutable law of nature: there’s safety in numbers. Traveling with friends is one of the best ways to keep yourself protected, particularly if you’re a young woman who may be at greater risk. This is of critical importance when attending social events or traveling in unlit areas. Whether on or off campus, attend events as part of a group and make a pact to look out for one another. Most importantly, never leave someone alone in a vulnerable or uncomfortable situation. If necessary, leave as a group and make other plans instead.

Be Social Media Savvy

Today our digital personas are just as real as our offline lives, and what happens on the Internet doesn’t necessarily stay there. So in the interest of safety, it’s best to keep the personal details to a minimum. First and foremost, be sure to disable location services so that no one can track your whereabouts as you post. Next, think twice before making any posts that include “sensitive” information. Over 80 percent of Internet-initiated crimes – crimes in which the criminal first identifies or tracks a target online – begin through social media, making your profiles excellent resources for any would-be criminals to find your location, daily routines and nearly anything else they might want to know.

“I’ll Be Back”

Whenever you venture out and about, make sure that someone knows where you’re going and when you expect to be back. It only takes a few moments to text friends or family members and inform them of your plans, and if something should ever go wrong, you’ll be glad that you did. If you don’t show up when and where you’re expected, having someone who can check in on you can make all the difference.

Do Your Research

Every campus has resources available to help keep you safe, but they aren’t of much use if you aren’t aware of them. Take some time to find out where your local campus safety or police station is located and be sure to save the phone number. Also familiarize yourself with any other useful services, such as psychological services and wellness centers. It’s also a good idea to locate any emergency phones and automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) on campus. A sudden cardiac arrest can happen to anyone at any time, and people who are quickly treated with an AED are five times more likely to survive.

Take Advantage of Safety Technology

If you haven’t done so already, sign up to get campus text alerts sent directly to your phone. These alerts will help you stay abreast of any incidents on your campus and will provide valuable safety information if necessary. Additionally, consider downloading a personal safety app to turn your phone into a pocket-sized security guard. There are many options available, all with their own feature sets, but the general idea is the same: these apps provide a way to stay in touch with friends and family, alert them to your plans and location and even send emergency alerts if you’re in need of help.

Lock It Up

There are thousands of burglaries on college campuses each year, and many of them could be prevented with one simple step: lock your doors! Make sure your roommates also understand the importance of keeping your dorm locked up securely, and never give out a key to anyone else. If you live off campus, or in a sorority or fraternity house, consider installing a basic video surveillance system or doorbell camera. If an intruder sees they’re being watched it’s a powerful deterrent, and it’ll also allow you to remotely view any visitors – unwanted or otherwise – right from your phone or mobile device.

Be Skeptical of Unknown Substances

Whether you’re out partying hard or simply looking for some Tylenol for a headache, never trust pills, liquids or other substances unless you know exactly what they are. It’s always better to pass on someone’s offer rather than risk consuming a spiked drink, a dangerous drug or some other foreign substance. Similarly, never put your drink down at a house party or in a bar.

Get Defensive

Many campuses and community centers offer free self-defense classes, and they’re well worth your time. Even if you hope never to need it, knowing how to respond quickly and effectively in the event of a physical threat is potentially life-saving. It doesn’t matter if you’re male or female – everyone could use a few tips from the experts, and if you witness potential acts of violence as a bystander this knowledge could help you prevent an assault from occurring.

Equip Yourself

There’s something to be said for preparing for the worst, and that’s exactly what personal defense items accomplish. Whether it’s a small canister of pepper spray or a safety whistle, it’s worth it for peace of mind to carry one or more non-lethal defense items with you when you’re out and about.

Whether you’re finishing your degree or shipping off to college for the first time, it’s important to make sure you’re properly prepared. With the simple tips above, you can feel confident in your ability to stay safe, protect yourself from whatever comes your way, and remember that GradGuard has your back!

 

Emma Bailey is a freelance writer and blogger based in Chicago, IL. A Midwest transplant from the state of California, she typically writes on the social justice issues that are closest to her heart. Her interests include kayaking, watching horror movies, and finding perfectly ripe avocados. You can find her on Twitter @emma_bailey90

Other Safety Transition

Packing for College – Some items Parents Shouldn’t Forget that don’t require any room!

August 8, 2017

Your car and student bags are likely overflowing, but here are a few vital things that college parents should remember that don’t require extra room.

Five additional items that you must not forget:

1) Create a personal file.While getting their belongings together, students should set up a file of key personal information, including a copy of their driver’s license, insurance cards, Social Security card, debit and credit cards and immunization records. Using a digital tool such as Evernote can be a smart idea as it will allow you to have all the information you need at your finger tips and can be easily shared.  A passport or a copy of one also is useful, both for travel and to confirm citizenship if you apply for a job.

2) Complete the FERPA form – before leaving your student at college be sure to discuss your expectations for how you can support their education and how you will be able to help them during a crisis.  Without your student providing permission, you will not have access to their university records.  Most colleges provide a form to complete during orientation or within the student account or you can also use the FERPA authorization form provided through College Parents of America.

3) Purchase at least some Tuition Insurance.  Starting at $29.95 for $2,500 of coverage per term tuition insurance is an affordable way to protect your investment in college.   It is vital to understand your college refund policy.   Most colleges don’t refund money after day 25 – even for illness, injury or disability – so you could be out thousands of dollars.   Tuition insurance may not be something you needed in high school or something you have even heard of, but most students would benefit by having at least a minimum of $5,000 of annual college refund insurance. 

4) Renters Insurance. “Don’t forget that colleges are not likely to replace stolen or damaged property of your student.  In addition, you may or may not have coverage for your student within your homeowner’s insurance policy which normally has limits of coverage including the full-time status of your student and up to 10% of your property coverage.  Expensive items like that new computer may not be fully covered; if you are worried about replacing it, then be sure to purchase renters insurance which costs typically less than fifty cents a day.  For protecting your stuff consider a college specific renters insurance plan such as those offered through GradGuard – which includes worldwide property coverage, replacement level coverage, and personal liability coverage.

5) Health Insurance.  Though you are not likely to forget it, we recommend that college families consider your alternatives when it comes to student health insurance.  See this useful and comprehensive article by The New York Times.   Your first choice is likely going to be your family policy.   If you are looking at buying your campus recommended plan, we suggest comparing the features and benefit levels.  If money is particularly tight and your student is in good health, then it is also possible to consider using a short-term medical plan while relying on the primary care services of the university health center.

Remember, that each of these tasks can be done before actually moving to campus, but purchasing tuition insurance must also be completed prior to the start of classes.   You can not purchase tuition insurance after the start of classes.

Other Safety

Campus Crime & Fires: Don’t expect your college to replace stolen or damaged property

August 1, 2017

According to data from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting program, there were 69,502 reported property crimes on college campuses in 2015. In 2018, Clery Act reports on campus safety reported that there were 1,726 fires within on-campus student housing.  

As a result, college families are smart to make-a-plan in case a student is a victim of theft, their property is damaged by a fire or water damage or if they are found responsible for damages they may cause.  In fact, according to a survey by College Parents of America, a majority of state insurance commissioners recommend college students consider renters insurance.

The Top 3 Reasons Renters Insurance is a Smart Decision for College Students:

  1. Can the student replace stolen or damaged personal property such as a backpack, bicycle or computer? – Renters insurance can replace stolen or damaged student property.  Renters insurance can cover those costs and help students get back to classes, without the added stress of a financial loss.
  2. Does the college or university replace stolen or damaged property?  – In a 2017 survey of student housing leaders, 98% of schools report that they do not replace stolen or damaged student property. Be sure to check with the college or university to see what their policy is and how much money is at risk.
  3. Can the student afford to pay for damages they cause and are found responsible for?  True renters insurance includes personal liability protection and can help pay for unintentional damages when a student cannot.

“Some families may have some protection through their homeowner’s policy, but they are often subject to high deductibles and making a claim on a policy can result in higher premium costs. As a result, for about $.50 cents a day, GradGuard’s college renters insurance plan is an affordable and practical way to protect your student from an unexpected financial loss that could disrupt a student’s semester,” said John Fees, co-founder of GradGuard, an authority on protecting the investment of college students and their families and a leading provider of insurance programs to more than two hundred colleges and universities.

Other Safety

How to Have Safe Parties this Summer

July 23, 2017

Summertime is coming to an end quickly! And with the summer comes tons of pool parties, barbecues, and late night bonfires. But when people plan these celebrations of the sun, most don’t think about the consequences and dangers involved. While parties in the summer can be some of the most fun, they can also come with the most danger and risks, both for those throwing the party and those enjoying it. So here are some tips to help you have a fun and safe summer!

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Other Safety

The Most Common Myths about Studying Abroad

June 18, 2017

What’s your biggest motivation for studying abroad? Of course, you want to get a high-quality education, but be honest: is that the only thing? If you’re like most other students, you want your studies to be the best adventure of your life. If a university accepts your application, you’ll get a chance to be part of that country’s culture.

You’re not wrong thinking this will be one of the most exciting adventures of your life. However, you’re probably thinking other things that will turn out a bit differently in reality. There are common myths about studying abroad, which we’ll unveil today.

  1. People Won’t Like You

If you browse through the Internet, you’ll start thinking that people from other countries don’t like international students that much. There’s a never-ending debate on this issue. As a foreigner, you’ll be contributing to this country’s economy, but some people will think you’re taking the seat of a native who deserves to be in that university.

This is not the impression you’ll get on campus. People will write anything online. In reality, international students contribute towards the diversity of the campus, and that’s what every university in the world wants to achieve. You’ll make the natives aware of the problems other countries face, and you’ll help them consider different points of view. International students are great contributors in productive classroom discussions.

  1. It Will Be Hard to Make Friends

Do you have the impression that foreign students stick with their own clique? That will be true only if you allow it to be. You can locate people from your country and the countries close to it, so you’ll feel the connection to your culture. However, that doesn’t mean that the native students will be hostile towards you. They will be very interested to know more about your country. You just need to give them a chance, and you’ll make friendships for life.

  1. “I’ll Just Do What Everyone Else Is Doing”

You’ll attend classes, take exams, write projects… how hard could it be? Everyone else will be doing the same thing, so you’ll handle the challenges, too. It may not be as easy as you perceive it. Think about it: the native students already have the needed foundation for writing academic papers. You, on the other hand, will have to write in a foreign language and adopt a different manner of expression.

Cathy Laurens, a writer for BestEssays, explains that international students face real struggles with academic writing. “They are just not ready for it, and the universities are not giving them the support and training they need. These academic papers are not impossible to write, but an international student has to invest double the effort a native puts in.”

  1. You’ll Have the Fun of Your Life

Think about it: you’ll be attending classes every day, and you’ll be studying like a maniac for tests and exams. You’ll have to write dozens of important projects each semester. Do you think you’ll have time to act like the college students you’re seeing on movies? Think again!

You will get enough time for friendships and hangouts. However, if you’re truly committed to your studies, you’ll need to shift your definition of fun. You can’t expect to attend wild parties every weekend and get sober just on time to study for the upcoming exam.

  1. It’s an Expensive Adventure

It will be if your family is taking care of all the finances. There’s an opinion that international students are rich. They can afford to pay thousands of dollars for tuition, and double that amount to cover their living expenses. In reality, many international students are getting top-level education thanks to scholarship programs.

The universities themselves include these types of financial aid to attract more international students their way. In addition, there are many other scholarship programs provided by governmental and private organizations.

  1. It’s Not Safe

You think your own town is the safest place on Earth? We all have the same feeling, simply because we don’t know what it’s like to live elsewhere. There are always parts of the world you’d like to avoid if you want to be safe, but you’re not signing up to be a photographer on a battlefield. If the country is relatively safe, you can expect the university campuses to be really safe. It is also worth knowing that the GradGuard renter’s insurance program that is most likely offered through your college and university provides world-wide property coverage.  So in case your backpack is stolen or damaged you will have coverage.

As long as you’re choosing a country that’s labeled as ‘safe to travel to,’ you’ll be just fine.

Did we help you form a more realistic vision of studying abroad? It’s an adventure and you’ll definitely face unexpected things. However, it will be a beautiful adventure when you’re prepared for it.

 

Author’s bio: Karen Dikson is a blogger and college instructor from New Jersey. Her works have been published on several education resources, including HuffingtonPost. Karen also participated in a teacher exchange program with Australia. Connect with Karen via Twitter.

Other Safety

Valuable Protection for International College Students

June 2, 2017

This is a big week for professionals who serve international students.

Screenshot 2017-06-02 11.23.16.jpegThe Association of International Educators, (NAFSA) is the world’s largest association dedicated to international education and exchange, is hosting its annual meeting and EXPO in Los Angeles.

With nearly one million international students attending American colleges and universities, it is important to understand the risks facing this valuable population.  International students will benefit from securing tuition insurance, renters insurance, and student health insurance prior to attending classes.

Three forms of insurance are particularly important for international students to consider securing to protect themselves from financial losses while studying in the United States.

International student health insurance – International students are often required to purchase student health insurance.  Typically students can purchase an affordable plan through their college or university or if they prefer they can also purchase it directly through GradGuard.

Tuition Insurance – If an international student becomes ill, injured or is forced to withdraw from classes mid-term, colleges and universities most often will only refund only a pro-rated amount of tuition and fees. Current Refund Policy Bar Chart Clip.jpeg

As a result, it is prudent for international students to become aware of the institution’s refund policy and to consider purchasing tuition insurance.  Tuition insurance is not drop out insurance but it can pay for the non-refunded losses to international students for tuition, academic fees, books, and housing.  Check the policy for complete details but tuition insurance is most often a smart buy for international students.

Tuition insurance is affordable and valuable protection but remember it must be purchased before the start of classes.
College Renters InsuranceMany international students are concerned about campus crime and safety.  Most are unprepared to replace a stolen computer or backpack, and many would benefit from the protection provided by renters insurance.

28000_burglaries_on_campus_copy.jpg

GradGuard’s renter’s insurance program is ideal for international students in that it does not require a credit check and provides worldwide property coverage

For less than $.50 cents a day, an international student can protect themselves from financial losses that they experience or are found responsible for.

GradGuard works with schools to provide our insurance programs to protect all students, but we are particularly sensitive to the unique needs of international students.  We know from experience that our student benefits provide real value to all students and particularly international students who may face even greater financial risk due to the investment they are making to attending college in the United States.  In a small way, we hope that GradGuard can improve the satisfaction and success of international college students.

Other Safety

Spring Break: Important Safety Tips

March 11, 2017

 

It’s that time of year again—time to pack up and get pumped for your upcoming spring break. Throw textbooks and worries to the wind as you enjoy your much-needed break from hectic college life. While this is definitely a time for celebrating, you shouldn’t be quite so carefree as to forget about safety. Before heading out, be sure to look over this list of tips for spring break safety.

Leaving your dorm or apartment:
First thing’s first: before leaving for spring break, you’ll need to secure your room and belongings. Follow your dorm regulations with the basics like defrosting your mini fridge and taking out the trash, but also take measures to keep your belongings safe. Take your valuables with you or store them out of sight in your room. You can also consider renters insurance to help protect your personal property. And of course, remember to lock up! 

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Other Safety

4 Personal Safety Accessories To Carry When Walking At Night

February 14, 2017

Whether you’re jogging around campus or walking home at night from a friend’s dorm, the potential for danger increases after dark. The reduced visibility and lack of eyewitnesses makes you a vulnerable target for would-be attackers.

As such, it’s important to be aware of your surroundings and prepare for self-defense if necessary. Luckily, there are a variety of new self-defense products available that are small and subtle yet effective at warding off attackers.

Next time you’re outside alone at night, keep these convenient and portable accessories within reach—they just might save your life in a compromising situation.

 

Keychain Panic Alarm

This safety device from SABRE is disguised as a USB flash-drive and attaches to a key ring for protection at your fingertips. If endangered, yank the built-in fob, which triggers a warning siren to deter the assailant and inform anyone nearby of your distress. The alarm’s bandwidth reaches up to 300 feet, increasing your prospects of staying safe. The money you spend on this particular keychain goes to support The Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network.

 

Miniature Stun Gun

This weapon from  Vipertek is compact enough to fit inside your pocket for quick access. When activated, the stun gun emits 35-million volts of electricity to disarm a perpetrator and render them temporarily motionless:

“A stun gun works by attacking the nervous system, delivering high-voltage electricity to an attacker’s body. Unlike tasers, stun guns must make direct contact with the assailant to work but they’re less regulated and typically smaller and easier to conceal,” explain experts at The Home Security Super Store.

In addition, this gadget is also equipped with a high-powered LED flashlight, so you won’t become disoriented in the darkness. It also uses rechargeable batteries for maximum efficiency.

 

Go Guarded Ring

This wearable from Fisher Defensive comfortably and securely adjusts to your finger, just like any other ring you’re already wearing. When you make a fist, and the ring’s pointed tip automatically extends, allowing you to stab an offender in their sensitive areas. For added protection, the snug fit ensures this weapon cannot be knocked from your hand, which could give you the advantage in a struggle.

 

Red Pepper Spray

This common self-defense item, also from SABRE, is made with a high-performance liquid compound to induce police-grade strength from a 10-foot range. Given its potency, this pepper spray is more effective than other brands, and the ultraviolet marking dye assists law enforcement with identifying suspects.

When using the device remember that the spray will take a few minutes to overcome the person, says Gary Sikorski of Reasonable Force Training. He continues, “That is why you have to ‘spray and move’ after deploying pepper spray, and always be prepared to physically defend yourself.”

 

 

This post was contributed to GradGuard by Jessica Thiefels

Jessica Thiefels has been writing for more than ten years and is currently a full-time blogger. She is also an ACE Certified Personal Trainer, NASM Certified Fitness Nutrition specialist, and the owner of her own personal training business, Honest Body Fitness. She’s using her experience from writing, editing and marketing to help people get healthy and learn to love what their bodies can do. Follow her on TwitterFacebook and Instagram for health articles, new workouts and more.

Other Safety

How to Keep Your Laptop Safe When Using Campus WiFi

November 3, 2016

College can be the best time of your life; it can also be filled with tons of minor headaches. Between managing classes and keeping the budget intact, it’s important to save a little here and a little there.

As a result, we cling to our tools and protect them like parts of ourselves. The thought of losing them is akin to some kind of natural disaster. Laptops are among the devices we use that rank most highly on the list of things to protect because they accomplish and save our works. Plus, they’re a great source of endless entertainment.

To stay frugal, most college students use their laptops on campus WiFi of some sort. Purchasing a data plan for your laptop costs an inordinate amount of money, and there are so many public access points that it hardly seems worth the cost. What few realize is just how costly campus WiFi can become.

Surfing the Unsecured Net

Campus WiFi is free—not counting the huge tuition costs associated with just being present—and many colleges have made a point to ensure adequate speed is provided for all attending classes. What they haven’t provided is a secured connection. But what exactly is a secured connection?

When you access WiFi, you’re either connecting to a password-protected, encrypted network, or you’re connecting to an unsecure network. Without the use of basic security measures, everyone connected is vulnerable to outside attack. Hackers are especially fond of public WiFi systems because they can scan through multiple victims to find data worth stealing, such as names, addresses, credit card information, social security numbers, etc.

It isn’t even a big challenge either; an amateur hacker is able to hack an open WiFi network in just under 11 minutes. Knowing that, what can you really do?

All is not lost. There are several security measures you can take to make sure your use of campus WiFi is considerably safer.

Encrypting Your Own Internet

So the campus hasn’t done its job; now what? Your best bet is to take steps to encrypt your own internet connection. Doing so will keep hackers out of your laptop and let you focus on doing what you came to do at college.

The best way to do that is by subscribing to one of the many Virtual Private Network (VPN) services available. Once a tool used predominantly by businesses and major universities for faculty, a VPN allows you to connect to a remote server before the rest of the net. These remote servers then encrypt your connection and allow you to do whatever it is you need to get done safely.

You might be asking yourself, “What exactly is encryption?” Simply put, encryption scrambles data into an unreadable format that can only be read with the right code. Because the code is so complicated on industry-standard encryption (typically described as 256-bit AES), hackers and other criminals can make no use of stolen data that’s been encrypted.

With that kind of system in place, you have little to be concerned about in terms of being hacked on WiFi. That’s not to say there aren’t other risks though.

Protecting Against Theft

Utilizing campus WiFi has many perks, but it also means taking your precious laptop to a very busy location. Even small colleges will typically have hundreds of people buzzing around at any given time, and the incidence of theft is relatively high at these locations.

As a result, it’s very important you take measures to make sure your laptop isn’t just stolen outright. Keeping an eye on it is a good first step; if you don’t leave it unattended, you’re considerably less likely to experience theft.

But data on your laptop is valuable, so valuable that you can’t leave things to chance. Make sure your laptop is properly locked up tight with a login password of considerable difficulty. Any personal information should be avoided in terms of the actual password content, as should full dictionary words or themes related to the university.

Stick with passwords that contain a minimum of eight characters, have a mixture of upper and lowercase letters, contain numbers, and have symbols. Long passphrases are also a good alternative, as they’re easy for you to remember but not so easy for thieves to guess.

Another step to consider is installing an anti-theft app. Several services exist, including PreyProject and Norton Anti-Theft, that allow you to track your stolen laptop and shut down functions from afar to prevent anything from being taken off the device.

In the event your laptop winds up lost, it can also be worth leaving your contact information on a sticker affixed to the exterior so Good Samaritans can help you recover your goods.

Value in the Information Age

There’s no question that what your laptop has on it is valuable to someone else. We live in a world where information can sometimes be more valuable than natural resources, and hacking has practically become its own black industry.

That isn’t something we need to be afraid of; it’s just another consideration to make as we move forward in each day. By taking the right steps to protect your laptop, you save yourself time, money and much-needed focus. As the steps involved aren’t particularly complicated or expensive, do yourself a favor: secure that connection!

 

 

Keep your laptop safe on your campus wifi network to prevent hacking and identity theft.

About the Author: Cassie is a lifelong learner with a focus on internet securities and cybercrime. She spends her days blogging about online safety and what can be done to prevent data theft, identity theft and general sabotage.

Other Safety

How to Protect Your Valuables At College 📱💻📷🚴📚

August 3, 2015
Protecting your valuables at college

Before you head back-to-college this fall, take a moment to consider how you’ll protect all those things you’re running around to buy and pack up so you’ll be as prepared as possible leading up to the big move-in day. Not trying to be a buzzkill, but theft, fires, and other damages can and do happen on college campuses, and your stuff is definitely vulnerable. In fact, more than 30,000 burglaries are reported annually related to college students, including 15,000 residence hall burglaries, according to government data. And each year, fire departments respond to over 3,800 fires in dormitories, fraternities, sororities, and barracks, according to the NFPA  – about one per campus, per year!

A little common sense with your valuables will go a long way at college (like even though the bathroom is RIGHT THERE and you’re alone at the library… still not smart to leave your laptop unattended for any amount of time…). Taking important precautionary measures will also certainly help reduce your risk. But what if the unexpected happens? For those times, you have options: insurance can help keep you and your stuff protected. If it would be difficult to replace your belongings at school due to theft or damage, you may want to consider how insurance can help.

Homeowners Insurance 🏠
Your parent’s homeowner’s insurance policy could offer you coverage for your personal property while living on campus. However, there are limitations to the coverage it’ll offer, and probably won’t offer you any coverage if you live off-campus. Ask your parents if you can review their policy to see exactly what kinds of things would be covered under their homeowner’s plan. Filing a claim against homeowner’s policies can affect their premium, and they’ll have to consider their deductible too. Try comparing the value and coverage of their current plan with a renters insurance policy.

Renters Insurance 🏢
Renters insurance can be a real life-saver for college students. Thieves on college campuses don’t have to look far to find laptops, smartphones, cash, bicycles, and electronics, a quick walk through the residence hall and it’s all there. Those items, plus clothes, school supplies, and more, can be protected by renters insurance.

Your personal property and liability may benefit from coverage from losses like theft, vandalism, fires, water damage, and more. College life is hectic enough without having to worry about how you’d pay to replace your stuff should something happen. Whether in a dorm or apartment (or anywhere in the world!), your personal belongings can be covered with the right renters insurance coverage. Make sure to check with an agent to learn more about your options. There are student-focused renters insurance plans available as well.

Regardless of what plan you choose, be sure to look for:

  • replacement cost, so you’ll be able to replace your belongings, not just their depreciated value
  • electronics coverage, so all your stuff is sure to be covered
  • check on other special limits – for things like jewelry, cash, musical instruments, to ensure your most prized possessions are protected
  • worldwide coverage, so no matter where you are, the library, spring break, etc. you’ll be covered
  • liability coverage
  • a low deductible

Learn more 📚
For a quick overview about the value of renters insurance for college students, watch this brief video.  Speak with your parents and an insurance agent to discuss options and to find the plan that’s best for you.