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The Top College Towns of 2020

April 22, 2020

Choosing a college is no small feat. There are a ton of factors that come into play, from academic programs to athletics. One factor that definitely shouldn’t be overlooked is location. The town or city a school is located in can play a big part in both your college experience not to mention your life and work after graduation.

When making our choices, we considered several factors, including student life and culture, available recreational activities, nearby attractions, and availability of high-speed internet and other college necessities. Here are our picks:

1. Gainesville, FL

Gainesville houses the University of Florida, known for its research programs, athletics, and parties. Gainesville was, at one time, one of the fastest-growing cities in the US, thanks in part to its excellent climate, beautiful landscape, and large number of entertainment options. 

When it comes to living in Gainesville, there’s plenty to do, including several state parks and museums to check out, and the Gainesville Raceway is a popular spot. The town also has a growing startup culture, so if building businesses is your thing, you’ll be in good company once you graduate.

2. Berkeley, CA

Located across the Bay from San Francisco, Berkeley has a long reputation as a great place to live. The weather is beautiful, the atmosphere is electric, and creativity and activism are everywhere. The University of California is regularly ranked as one of the best in the country, and the area has a rich history dating back to the late ‘60s and the hippy movement. What more could you want in a college town?

Berkeley also has another major advantage: it’s situated only an hour or so away from Silicon Valley. This makes it an ideal candidate for folks in the tech space, as well as potential founders looking to fund startups.

3. Boulder, CO

Boulder has a reputation as one of the best places to live in the US, with gorgeous surroundings, excellent art and food cultures, and the popular University of Colorado providing a backdrop. Like Berkeley, Boulder has a bit of a hippy past, and between that and the beautiful natural landscape make it an ideal spot for adventurous students and adults alike.

There’s a ton to do in Boulder, especially if you like outdoor activities. The entire area is surrounded by nature preserves, recreational land, and climbable mountains. The city also regularly makes lists of the best places to live in the US, including “Happiest City,” “Brainiest City,” and “Best City to Raise an Outdoor Kid.”

4. Athens, GA

Home of the University of Georgia, Athens rounds out the list of best college towns. Unlike some of the other towns on the list, rent in Athens actually falls below the national average, making it an affordable town both during school and after graduation. Music is a big part of the culture, with several national acts, including R.E.M. and Widespread Panic, coming out of Athens. The University of Georgia is home to the Georgia Bulldogs, and their games are a big part of life in Athens.

One downside to living in Athens is that you may have a harder time finding reliably fast internet here, especially if you’re living in the more outlying areas. If that’s the case for you, there are rural internet options available that might help.

These four college towns have something for almost everyone, whether you’re a football fan itching to get on down to Georgia or a budding software engineer looking to make it big in Silicon Valley. Just don’t forget to squeeze in some studying and secure your college renters insurance upon move in!

Other Transition

Home Away From Home: Completing a Long Distance Campus Move

April 22, 2020

Long-distance moves are already stressful and exhausting, but when your destination is a college campus with a new dorm, a full class load, and an entirely new social circle, it can feel downright overwhelming. Here are a few tips and suggestions to keep in mind as you prepare to leave the familiar comforts of the well-known behind and launch into the geographically distant academic adventures that lie ahead.

Go Into Things Healthy

It’s a good idea to take some time before your big move to ensure that you’re in tip-top physical, mental, and emotional shape as you go through the rigors of a larger move. A few suggestions for ways to do this include:

  • Getting a checkup.
  • Sleeping well in the days and weeks leading up to the move.
  • Eating healthy food.
  • Exercising.
  • Meditating and/or praying on a daily basis.

If you can pursue health and wellness in the lead up to your move, you’ll be able to weather the drama and chaos much easier.

Pack Smart

When it comes to your move you may think you’re on your own. After all, none of your friends or family are likely coming with you to live on campus. But that doesn’t mean you can’t ask friends and family for help

Pull the classic “if you come and help me pack I’ll get everyone pizza at the end of the day” pitch. This turns the event into less work for yourself as well as a fun opportunity for everyone to hang out one last time before you leave.

Plan Your Trip

Before you ever hop in the car or turn the key, make sure to carefully plan out your trip. What route will you take? Do you need to stop along the way to rest? Are you giving yourself plenty of time to get there even if you’re held up by a minor issue like traffic or an extra rest stop visit? Taking the time to plan things out can make everything more peaceful as you go.

Set Your Expectations

When you arrive on campus you’ll likely be exhausted and overwhelmed. That’s why it’s important to set your expectations ahead of time. Try to time your arrival so that you have enough time to unpack and then crash and get some rest. In addition, take time before you arrive on campus to associate yourself with several of the classic college concerns of any student, such as choosing classes, looking for extracurricular activities, nailing down financial aid, and understanding where all of the on-campus sports and exercise equipment is.

In addition, if you’re living in a dorm, associate yourself with some of the wiser considerations when it comes to moving in with a roommate. For instance, make sure to create a roommate agreement, discuss appropriate decor, and define boundaries. Before you do any of that, though, remember to be patient and strive to create a good relationship at your initial meeting.

Making It a Smooth Move

If you take the time to foster your health, inform yourself, recruit help, and plan ahead you’ll be able to make a cross-country college move much easier on your mind, body, and soul. When the big day comes, instead of feeling overwhelmed and scrambling, you’ll feel empowered and ready to embrace the adventure that lies ahead.

Remember that renters insurance and tuition insurance are musts when going away to college! GradGuard offers both so you can have even more peace of mind when going through this transitional time.

BIO: Dan Matthews is a writer with a degree in English from Boise State University. He has extensive experience writing online at the intersection of business, finance, marketing, and culture.

Health Other

How More Music, Theater, and Dance Boosts Students’ Writing Scores: Top Secret Tricks

April 17, 2020

Writing assignments are an inevitable part of education, but they prove to be too stressful for many students. Multiple factors influence the writing scores including stress levels, understanding of the subject, creativity, the level of critical thinking, among other things. If you are looking to improve writing scores then music, theater, and dance could help you out. How? Let’s see.

Visible results

Students measure their results and success by things they see and although this seems obvious, writing doesn’t provide that. How? Writing assignments involve developing an argument or composing a paper on a given subject. Then, the student submits the paper to the teacher and waits for the results. For students who struggle with writing it can be difficult to assess their success and the level of progression until they get the score. Dancing, singing, and performing arts are different. The student can immediately see how well she or he is doing. How does this translate to writing you wonder? Well, doing well in performing arts gives confidence boost they need to express their thoughts, opinions, and emotions in the paper and develop or improve writing skills. 

Self-evaluation 

Performance of any kind calls for a great deal of self-evaluation. Whether it’s music, dance, theater, or something else the student will always assess the strengths and weaknesses looking for something to improve. The habit of self-evaluation can also serve in the improvement of writing scores. It teaches a student to take a look at the paper from a different angle and identify parts where improvement is necessary. Habits developed with performing arts can easily apply to the writing skills and their development and better scores ensue. 

Stress relief through conquered challenges

One of the biggest advantages of theater, dance, and music is their ability to manage stress and anxiety. Academic life is stressful and, as you already know, stress harms overall performance. When engaging in performing arts students learn how to manage and relieve stress levels which can help them feel calmer when writing and composing their assignments.

Enhanced cognitive abilities

Performing arts such as music lessons, dancing, theater, and others can boost cognitive skills in students. For example, studies show that music lessons can enhance language-based reasoning, short-term memory, planning, and inhibition in students. Stronger cognitive function improves how students express themselves, sharpens critical thinking, and makes them overall more creative. All these factors are necessary for great writing scores. 

Conquering fear

Students tend to worry a lot about their teacher’s reaction to the paper. They are scared to express themselves out of fear it might lead to negative remarks. However, writing scores don’t work that way. Engaging in dancing, music, or joining drama group helps students conquer the fear and focus on themselves and their performance only. You learn how to be the best you can be without constantly thinking about someone else’s reactions. The freedom you experience when performing arts can help you conquer fears in writing assignments as well. 

Better writing scores is what most students want, but aren’t sure how to achieve it. The answer is simple; join a drama group, sing, play an instrument, and perform arts in some other way. Confidence boost, stress management, enhanced cognitive functions are some of many reasons why performing arts can help improve writing skills and contribute to better scores. They teach us how to feel free to express ourselves and evaluate the performance to keep doing better and better each time.

BIO: Kathrin Garner is an enthusiastic journalist and writes articles on social issues. As an activist, she takes part in the FV KASA program, which is a discussion platform on relevant cannabis topics. She searches for current issues and writes about it to a wide range of readers.

Career Other

5 Ways to Avoid the Post-Grad Slump

April 17, 2020

College graduation is quickly approaching, and while it’s a time of celebration and achievement, it can also be the pivotal moment right before post-graduate depression kicks in. Graduating college is a huge transitional period for young adults as they start to work tirelessly to enter the “real world.” Stay ahead of the post-grad slump with these 5 tips: 

1. Make a Timeline

A visible timeline is key to keeping yourself busy and on track while securing your first post-grad role. Setting soft deadlines for yourself allows you to keep your efforts organized and meaningful. For example, if you graduate in May, you may want to set the goal of having 20 applications submitted by the second week of June. Utilize resources for finding a job to determine if your goals are realistic and achievable. 

2. Look good, feel good 

It goes without saying that when you look your best, you feel your best. Take time to care for your appearance right after college, whether that means getting a fresh haircut or treating hair loss, so you enter the adult world feeling the most confident. You should also create a consistent skincare routine to follow every night to keep yourself pampered and feeling excited to show your face. Exercise is a key ingredient to feeling good. The Department of Health and Human Services recommends that everyone engages in at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day to ward off stress and boost their mood. So, get out there and find your favorite way to stay fit! These small adjustments should help you feel good and ready to impress.

3. Keep a positive mindset 

Make sure you’re taking care of your mental health during this stressful period of your life. This could mean spending time with your family and friends to get some daily laughter in, or meditating in the morning to start the day with an open mind and heart. Therapy is another great option for staying on top of your mental health. Whatever it may be, know that it’s okay to take a deep breath and just trust that you will find the right opportunity to use your degree.  

4. Enhance your skillset 

During your downtime between graduating college and finding a job, why not pick up some new skills? There’s plenty of online classes and certifications available to learn something beneficial, like Excel or graphic design. Continuing to learn after college is not only good for your brain but is also a way for you to stay motivated and dedicated to bettering yourself, which will make you feel accomplished. 

5. Reward yourself 

Motivating yourself with rewards is a wonderful method for staying on track and holding yourself accountable. When you achieve a milestone in the post-graduate process, make sure to celebrate, even if it’s small. If you have something to look forward to then you’ll be less likely to find yourself in a funk.  

With the help of these tips, recent grads will be able to dodge entering a post-grad depression. Start these practices as soon as you can in order to maximize productivity, feel good, and start your first career with a positive mindset!

Career Other

4 Modern HR Tools Recruiters Are Using That Every Applicant Should Know About

April 10, 2020

As you begin your career search, preparing your resume, preparing for interviews, and choosing your professional attire will likely be the most important things on your mind. However, with new technology emerging in the human resources industry, a new set of requirements and preparations could arise for job applicants. Being prepared for what these changes may mean for you could help you land the job you want.

Here are five of the modern HR tools that recruiters are using nowadays that every applicant should know: 

Social Media

Social media is becoming a popular means of recruitment for companies of all sizes. There are a variety of ways in which a recruiter can benefit from using social media, such as:

  • Advertising open positions
  • Sourcing candidates
  • Highlighting company culture
  • Screening candidates 

You must use caution when posting online. Not only are companies looking to see what you are talking about or what you may be like, but they are often looking for any red flags that may stick out on your social profiles. A company could end up deciding not to hire a candidate solely based on something they found online

Talent Management Software

When considering the large number of applications that employers usually receive for any given position, they need to have a central processing system that can handle large sets of data. 

By using talent management software to process candidates appropriately, candidates are kept up to date with any hiring decisions as they’re made. This software also provides applicants with an easily accessible hub for gathering information and completing files in the hiring process. Once an applicant is hired, this software can be used for the entirety of the onboarding process and even throughout their tenure at the company. 

Resume Screening Tools

A resume screening tool automatically processes your resume to see if it is a potential match for the job description based on keywords the employer has chosen to screen for. Applicants with the best matches are then put into a smaller pool to be reviewed by the recruiter. Resumes that do not match the criteria, whether they are a fit or not, usually do not receive a second look. 

For employers, this can help limit the often-large selection of applications they receive, but for qualified candidates, it could cause them to miss out on seemingly perfect opportunities. Because of this, it’s important to tailor your resume for each position

Automated Background and Reference Checks

As automation technology continues to advance, more companies are finding ways to use it to increase efficiency across their business. In recruitment, this can be especially beneficial for running background checks and contacting references.  

Businesses can use this technology to automatically scan any registered databases and verified systems to see if your name appears alongside anything worrisome, such as criminal records or false social security numbers. 

For your references, automation ensures a smooth communicative process so the business can send them pre-populated questions they can answer and send back quickly. This can help prevent candidates from being held up in this portion of the hiring process. 

Video Conferencing for Interviews

In the modern world, work situations are becoming unique to each employee. With the introduction of video conferencing tools for interviewing purposes, more applicants can apply to positions of interest to them, no matter their location. 

This can be extremely beneficial for you as an applicant if you live in a different location than the position you are applying for and are looking to relocate or work remotely.

Because technology in recruiting has increased significantly over time, you must consider how prospective employers will view your application and interview. Enlist the help of professionals to ensure your application has the potential to stand out at the top of any employer’s list.

Other Student Life

Are You a College Student? It’s Time to Control Your Finances

April 2, 2020

Getting an education is one of the best things you can do for your financial future. However, it’s just part of the success equation and it’s easy to make financial decisions that complicate things. It’s best to take control of your finances as early as possible and it’s never too early. The tips below can help any college student take charge of their finances.

Establish a Savings Account

Saving money is something that some college students don’t think about because there’s usually a limited amount of money available. Even if that’s the case, it’s best to set aside a small amount of money to serve as an emergency fund. Things happen and you don’t want to end up in a financial bind without a solution.

Avoid Debt When Possible

The biggest debt that most college students incur is student loans. That’s because college is expensive and sometimes it’s hard to pay for tuition and the cost of living without a loan. If there is ever a way to avoid getting a student loan or any other debt, you should definitely steer clear. Some people struggle for a lifetime to pay off student loan debt. If you decide to get a loan, make sure you do so wisely by consulting with a financial aid advisor.

Monitor Your Spending

A simple financial rule that should always be followed is to spend less money than you make. It’s easier to spend more money than you actually earn by using credit cards. This is rarely a good idea and it’s usually something that people end up regretting for many years.

Limit Credit Card Use

Credit cards are surprisingly easy to get when you’re a college student, which can be unfortunate because you’re still learning about finances. Sometimes what happens is the credit cards are maxed out and not paid on time. As a result, a good number of college students end up having to repair their credit later. If you end up getting a credit card, make sure you get one with a low interest rate and pay off the balance monthly.

Stick with a Budget

Having a budget is far more important than you may realize. That’s because knowing how much money you have to spend and sticking with your commitment not to exceed your budget can help you achieve your financial goals. If you need to earn more money, consider a side gig like Uber if you have a vehicle. You’ll be considered a contractor and you can work whenever you want. Instead of receiving Form W2, Uber will use a 1099 generator and send you the information by email or regular mail.

Start Investing

If you’re working a full-time job and they provide a retirement account, make sure you take full advantage of that benefit. It’s easy to think you have plenty of time to invest in a retirement account, but that time will go by quickly. By starting at a young age, you’re more likely to achieve your retirement goals.

Maintain Insurance

Health and disability insurance are two types of insurance that most people should have. If you don’t know whether or not you have these insurance plans, check with your employer. If you don’t have them, it’s time to get them. Not having insurance is something that can have devastating consequences when it comes to your finances.

Being a college student doesn’t mean you don’t have to be diligent about your finances and the financial decisions you make now will impact your future. Since you will probably have a learning curve like most people, it’s best to read as much as possible about personal finances. You’ll be glad you did.

BIO:Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.

Other Student Life

Where to Store Your Stuff

March 27, 2020

As finals approach, each hour is precious for those college students who will be going home for the summer. Some of them could simply pack their suitcases and drive home, but others might have an apartment or a dorm room full of furnishings. Being able to retain their belongings without making it into yet another hassle can take time and planning, and it can cut into valuable study time. Here are a few suggestions that might help ease the mind and leave plenty of time for study.

Start Winnowing Possessions

When the last semester begins, it is time to start winnowing possessions into what should be kept and what should not. For those who have a dorm room with mostly clothes and personal belongings, it can be a simple matter to decide what they really want to keep. Others will find they have to start making choices about items of furniture that really matter, and they need to consider what can be easily replaced.

Consider the Next Semester

Living in a dorm room is relatively easy when it comes to limiting possessions, but those who want to continue living off-campus will need to consider the next semester. If they will be renting another apartment, furniture will likely be important. Even a partially furnished apartment has room for a few items any student might find necessary, so making decisions now about the next semester should figure into what to keep and what to give away or toss out.

Taking It Home

Parents are a good resource for college students, and many return home for the summer months. Their family is often ready to welcome them with open arms, but it might become an issue when moving back home. Being able to pack and load everything into a moving van will be the easy part, but is there enough storage in the basement or attic to accommodate everything is something that should be considered. Taking it home might sound great, but it is only good if there is enough storage room available.

Packing Up

Whether it will take only a few suitcases or a moving van, packing up is part of the process. For those who will be able to easily move, labels and lists are not necessary. Those storing their possessions at home or in a facility over the summer will need to make sure they pack their items in good boxes and label them. Even furnishings should be wrapped during the move, and it should remain on them until they are secure in the new dorm room or apartment.

Using a Storage Facility

It might not be feasible to take everything home, but students who wish to keep their possessions could consider using a storage facility. It might also be less expensive to rent a unit for a few months than packing everything up and bringing it home. There are plenty of good options available, and small units can be very affordable. Making sure to use all the available space in a small unit can keep the cost low, and it will avoid the need for renting a vehicle to move a long distance. For those who were considering the time it takes to load and unload, it could be just as easily done while moving into a storage unit than moving it all home.

Shop Around

The cost of storage can vary even within a small geographical area, so it is important to shop around for the best deal. Some facilities offer discounts for students, and others have rental specials at certain times of the year. Most of the information can be found online, and even taking the time to call and ask about multiple rentals for several students might garner a discount or two.

Student Deals

The need for summer storage has long been an issue, and there are a few colleges offering students help in this area. Contact the Student Union on campus for possible assistance, and ask them if they have a discount deal with any local storage facilities. For those seeking more options, there are some storage facilities that cater to students such as SMARTBOX.

Whether you decide to pack everything up and take it home or leave it in a storage unit, remember that GradGuard offers worldwide personal property coverage as an automatic added endorsement with their renters policies! Be sure to have your items protected whether they are traveling home for the summer or locked up in a storage box.

Career Other

3 Tips to Help New Students Decide Their Major

March 16, 2020

You’ve just arrived at college. Between the endless activities, free time and paths to choose for yourself, you are immediately bombarded with a plethora of choices to make. How do your study habits change? How do you make sure you get along with your roommate? How will you make friends? However, the most important one is a choice that centers on your education: your major. There can be a ton of pressure when choosing a major from friends and family, not to mention your own dreams of what field you’d like to work in after graduation. Here are three tips for helping new students decide their major. 

Consider Your Skills

When choosing a major, it’s easy to default right away to what you think will end up making you the most money. Everyone has occasional dreams of financial grandeur, and tying that into your decision of what to major in seems like a reasonable choice. However, make sure that when picking your major, you consider where your main skills and interests are. If you don’t have the passion for accounting but are a magnificent writer, think about how perfecting your writing to an elite level via an English major could pay off for you in the long run, versus merely being an average accountant. Sometimes, the “smart” choice in choosing a major isn’t necessarily the one that traditionally would earn you the most money. It’s the one where you can excel and perform at a high level. 

Think About After Graduation

When choosing a major, you’ll obviously want to keep what exactly it is that you want to do after graduation in the front of your mind. If you want to go right into the business world, a major that gives you a solid business background would be preferred. If you’re thinking about taking a gap year and then going to graduate school, a major that you think would help you perform well in your post-secondary education would be a smart move. While you certainly don’t have to be sure of what you want to do after graduation, you can think about a general field you wouldn’t mind having a job in and see if your education can inspire greater interest in the topic. 

Don’t Rush It

When you arrive at school, it may seem like you have to decide on a major as quickly as possible so you can start classes and tell friends and family about the direction you have. But don’t make the mistake of declaring a major just for the sake of declaring a major. Take your time to work through the different possibilities of what you could specialize in your head before making the decision. The last thing you want is to regret rushing to declare a major in a year when you’re in the thick of classes and it’s too late to switch. Think through what you really want out of your college experience, and then use that to guide your choice.

Choosing a college major is a high-pressure situation. However, if you consider what your skills are, think about what you want to do after graduation and don’t rush into making the choice, you can be sure that you’re making a choice that you can be confident in. Once you pick your major, you’ll be free to dive into your studies and enjoy all that the college experience has to offer.

Health Other

The Doctor is Out: Non-Medical Career Paths in Healthcare

March 9, 2020

Maybe you’ve always thought about a career in medicine, but blood isn’t really your thing. Or maybe you’ve actually embarked on a career as a healthcare provider, but the road is long, and you’ve got to make ends meet while you chase your dreams. The good news is you have a lot of options for pursuing a career in the healthcare industry outside of the practice of medicine itself.

Think About What You Want

As you explore your options in the healthcare industry, you’ll want to consider not only what kind of work you want to do, but also what you need from your job. Before you accept a job, you need to ensure they offer a benefits package that serves you today as well as tomorrow, especially if you’re considering staying for the long haul. Ensuring that your prospective employers offer benefits, such as retirement and medical, dental, and vision insurance, can help protect you now and well into the future.

The Good Enough Job

If you’re not yet ready to settle into your forever job, you can still find great ways to make a solid living while you work toward your ultimate career goals. For example, if you’re a medical student looking to earn some income and garner some experience in the healthcare industry, there are a lot of great sites you can turn to. Major job boards like Indeed and Monster can help you tailor your job search to your particular requirements, while other sites like College Recruiter are dedicated specifically to helping undergraduate and graduate students connect with prospective employers.

Turning a Job into a Career

If you’re ready to start your career now instead of waiting on that advanced degree or those years of clinical training, you don’t have to abandon the healthcare industry to do it. There are endless options for stable, well-paying, and richly rewarding jobs in the healthcare industry. For instance, if computers, as well as healthcare, are at the top of your interests, then why not combine them by pursuing a career in Big Data and healthcare AI?

Or you may want to be a bit more hands-on while sparing yourself the rigors of med school. Studies show that careers in home health are among the most in-demand and fastest-growing in the US. Or, if you’re ready to commit yourself to a bit more time in school, you can build an exciting and very lucrative career with a Masters’s degree in health law and policy!

The Takeaway

Even if you feel a career in medicine isn’t for you, that doesn’t mean you have to abandon your interest in the healthcare field. Whether you’re looking for a temporary job in the industry to make ends meet while you cultivate vital professional experience, or you’re hoping to launch your professional career, your options are virtually endless. The healthcare industry has something in it for just about everyone, from health AI and Big Data to home healthcare to health law. So do a little exploring to find the career path that’s tailor-made for you!

Other Transition

What You Need to Know About Applying for College

February 28, 2020

After 12 years of general education, the time has come to join the big leagues. No matter what degree you’re aiming for, going to college can be exciting and frightening at the same. It all starts with you trying to find a reputable college.

If this is your first time applying to college, you might be feeling a little nervous and confused. However, it doesn’t have to be this way. Your college experience should always be an exciting experience.

Here’s what you need to know about applying for college.

Research Early On

You don’t have to wait until you graduate high school to look for a college. In fact, it’s recommended that you search during your time in high school. You should spend a majority of your junior year in high school looking for colleges.

Your senior year should primarily focus on learning the admission process. The admission process can vary, so it’s important to research each college and its requirements. This is where college admissions counseling comes in. They’ll help you set up everything and guide you through the process.

Determine Whether You Should Take the SAT or ACT

Once you’ve figured out what college you want to attend, the next thing you need to consider is what test to take. You can either take the SAT or the ACT. Both of these tests are used as an entryway into most colleges and go over the same subjects. The only real difference is how they’re scored. SATs are scored using a scale between 600 to 2400 while the ACTs measure scores by using 1 to 36.

In general, it doesn’t really matter which test is taken as most colleges take both of them. It’s just that some students do better with the SATs than the ACTs and vice versa. It is possible to take both of them. In fact, taking both of these tests can increase the likelihood of you getting accepted.

Be Ready to Face Rejection

If you get rejected by your college, don’t get discouraged. You can always apply again. But don’t sit around waiting for one college to accept you. Just because one college gave you a rejection doesn’t mean all of them will.

Sure, it may be a little heartbreaking to know that after all of the hard work you’ve done, all you received was a rejection letter. However, even the best of the best get rejections too. They could have the perfect grades and credentials, but the college rejected them anyway.

Applying to college is an exciting process, but it can also be very difficult. So, it’s important that you start off on the right foot. These tips aim to help you achieve just that.

BIO: Brett Clawson has a degree in Business Management and has started a couple of small businesses. When he’s not focusing his time on those, he spends time with his wife and two sons. His oldest son has entered the wonderful realm of college, and he now enjoys sharing tips that he and his son have found essential for college life.